Looking for suggestions!

Hi everyone!

I'm still new here in BP and I'm planning to buy an apartment here in BP. The apartment is 120sqm. In D. 12!

So I'm basically looking for advices!

1. I need a trustworthy English speaking lawyer, who can handle my property paper work.

2. The apartment needs whole renovation, so how can i find a renovation team here?

3. From where can I buy all furniture including electronic items!

4. The apartment needs refurbishment as well, as wiring and pipes haven't been changed so far in 10 years or so!

I don't know if I'm forgetting anything else to ask! What else should I consider? 😞

I would be happy if someone can guide me or send me some reliable contacts!

Lilyrom :

Hi everyone!

I'm still new here in BP and I'm planning to buy an apartment here in BP. The apartment is 120sqm. In D. 12!

Welcome to here. 120m2 in district XII is quite large. Nice.

.......

Lilyrom :

1. I need a trustworthy English speaking lawyer, who can handle my property paper work.

Difficult but not impossible.  Contact the Chamber of Lawyers here. Hungarian Bar Association

Lilyrom :

2. The apartment needs whole renovation, so how can i find a renovation team here?

You'll be lucky.  You could be looking for months (or even years).  You need to ask someone who knows someone who knows someone.  There's a massive shortage of people doing that work here.  If you can speak Hungarian it would help but even that won't guarantee anything. 

We've got a job for here which is worth more than a few million HUF and no-one so far is interested. We've been looking for a year. Some of the builders are idiots or "kontars" (bodgers).  You need to stand over them to make sure they don't screw it up.  Don't leave it to them.  All the good workers have gone to Germany, UK, NL or other places.

Lilyrom :

3. From where can I buy all furniture including electronic items!

Furniture - get it at Ikea.  Get an Ikea points card.

Electronics - Auchan isn't bad and you can get points to collect. 

Otherwise, Google argep.hu and arukereso.hu. 

Visit the shop and then check the web sites to see if it's cheaper. 

jofogas.hu is OK for second hand stuff but you need to be able to move it yourself.

Lilyrom :

4. The apartment needs refurbishment as well, as wiring and pipes haven't been changed so far in 10 years or so!

10 years isn't so old.  Wiring should last 15 years at least. Pipes same.  Maybe you would just like to reorganise the things in the apartment.

Lilyrom :

I don't know if I'm forgetting anything else to ask! What else should I consider? 😞

If you replace any gas appliances like the boiler for heating, you need prior permission and only  the gas company or an authorised person can connect it. Allow 3-6 months to get that done (note like in GoT winter is coming).  Electrical system also needs a certificate.  You should friendly with the building manager/residents committee etc.

Lilyrom :

1. I need a trustworthy English speaking lawyer, who can handle my property paper work.
!

The US Embassy has a list of local attorney, who claim to speak English:

https://hu.usembassy.gov/wp-content/upl … t-2019.pdf

How "trustworthy" they are..... well... that is another issue.

fluffy2560 :
Lilyrom :

2. The apartment needs whole renovation, so how can i find a renovation team here?

You'll be lucky.  You could be looking for months (or even years).  You need to ask someone who knows someone who knows someone.  There's a massive shortage of people doing that work here.  If you can speak Hungarian it would help but even that won't guarantee anything. 

We've got a job for here which is worth more than a few million HUF and no-one so far is interested. We've been looking for a year. Some of the builders are idiots or "kontars" (bodgers).  You need to stand over them to make sure they don't screw it up.  Don't leave it to them.  All the good workers have gone to Germany, UK, NL or other places..

Yep.

What Fluffy said.

IMHO, If you have to renovate in Hungary today.... you probably should not buy the property. Unless you DIY (or know a guy, who is a good general contractor, and is available.... And you speak Hungarian, and can be there while they work, and know enough to correct them when they make mistakes).

klsallee :
fluffy2560 :
Lilyrom :

2. The apartment needs whole renovation, so how can i find a renovation team here?

....
We've got a job for here which is worth more than a few million HUF and no-one so far is interested. We've been looking for a year....

Yep.

What Fluffy said.

IMHO, If you have to renovate in Hungary today.... you probably should not buy the property. Unless you DIY (or know a guy, who is a good general contractor, and is available.... And you speak Hungarian, and can be there while they work, and know enough to correct them when they make mistakes).

Yes, indeed.  We've had a couple of people round but they seem not to like the job. One of them said he wanted to build entire houses, not do lots of "secondary jobs" as one contract even though the value of our job could be quite high.  Our budget is for certain high enough but even with that but it seems almost impossible to get people even to look at the job now.  They don't turn up, don't answer the phone or have gone away.  And Mrs Fluffy is a local,  is well connected and knows lots and lots of people.

I am coming to the point of considering hiring the machines and individual workers even doing a lot of it myself.  I'm getting fed up with it as it wastes my time - I am better gainfully employed elsewhere.   

We've now  talked of trying to get workers from Romania or maybe  somewhere like Moldova to come and do the big heavy stuff needing plenty of muscle and we'll finish it all off at our leisure. Yup, it's coming to that now.  Luckily I'm pretty good with DIY, have lots of tools and relatively a fast learner for a miserable old hippy.

Oh... I forgot one "problem" with DIY in Hungary: Getting quality parts and products.

Its seems everything here is either cheap in quality or an apparent dumping ground for rejected parts. Very annoying.

Yesterday, for the second time in 5 months, a new plumbing fixture I put in broke. The latest one was leaking, and I put a wrench to it to see if doing a little (but not forced) tightening on the Teflon wrap on the threads would strop the leak and the damn thing just broke off at the threads. It was a bronze connector. Never, ever, had such a thing happen before. And looking at where it broke, the damn leak was because the part was leaking from between the threads because the metal had a crack in it. Fortunately, I had turned off the water to that part of the house first.

But still, very annoying.

klsallee :

Oh... I forgot one "problem" with DIY in Hungary: Getting quality parts and products.

Its seems everything here is either cheap in quality or an apparent dumping ground for rejected parts. Very annoying.

Yesterday, for the second time in 5 months, a new plumbing fixture I put in broke. The latest one was leaking, and I put a wrench to it to see if doing a little (but not forced) tightening on the Teflon wrap on the threads would stop the leak and the damn thing just broke off at the threads. It was a bronze connector. Never, ever, had such a thing happen before. And looking at where it broke, the damn leak was because the part was leaking from between the threads because the metal had a crack in it. Fortunately, I had turned off the water to that part of the house first.

But still, very annoying.

You might want to try the horse hair and sealant method.  I am amazed that it makes some waterproof joints. 

Won't make up for bad manufacture though. 

We got some taps (US: faucets) from Aldi and so far been quite good.  I think they'd probably cough up under a guarantee with a receipt if defective within a year.

fluffy2560 :

You might want to try the horse hair and sealant method.  I am amazed that it makes some waterproof joints.

The next time I am near a horse, I will remember to bring my scissors....

But seriously.... I try to avoid threaded connections when possible because they are **the** leak point. Especially since Loctite is so expensive and so not even carried by anyone local here, so I don't have any. But I may just cough up the money and order some by mail. There are other plumbing sealants here, but I don't know them, how reliable they are, and have no experience with them. And sealing up a wall with a huge question mark around the fixture behind it, bothers me....

klsallee :
fluffy2560 :

You might want to try the horse hair and sealant method.  I am amazed that it makes some waterproof joints.

The next time I am near a horse, I will remember to bring my scissors....

But seriously.... I try to avoid threaded connections when possible because they are **the** leak point. Especially since Loctite is so expensive and so not even carried by anyone local here, so I don't have any. But I may just cough up the money and order some by mail. There are other plumbing sealants here, but I don't know them, how reliable they are, and have no experience with them. And sealing up a wall with a huge question mark around the fixture behind it, bothers me....

I don't know what it's called in Hungarian, but the sealant in German is Locherpaste.

You get some horsehair and make it into a kind of thicker cord maybe about 30cm long, then wrap it around in the grooves of the threads directly.  Splodge on some locherpaste all around the horsehair.   Works a treat.

I know nay (neigh)-sayers (joke!) will be put off and I know Teflon and Loctite seems the right answer but horsehair and locherpaste works perfectly, it's pretty cheap to use too and is eons old/proven.

BTW, I know it's not really horsehair but I thought it was at one point.  It's hemp really. Don't smoke it!!

fluffy2560 :

You get some horsehair and make it into a kind of thicker cord maybe about 30cm long, then wrap it around in the grooves of the threads directly.  Splodge on some locherpaste all around the horsehair.   Works a treat.

Grand to read it works a treat.

But sounds way too complicated to  me, when I know Loctite 577 just works.

klsallee :

....
But sounds way too complicated to  me, when I know Loctite 577 just works.

Conversely,  it's locally available and it's the same thing used by plumbers all over Europe (particularly Germany and Austria as far as I know).  And it's a helluva lot cheaper than Loctite 577. Probably about 1/3 to 1/4 of the price and does the same, if not a better job.

fluffy2560 :
klsallee :

....
But sounds way too complicated to  me, when I know Loctite 577 just works.

Conversely,  it's locally available and it's the same thing used by plumbers all over Europe

I am sure it is a wonderful, natural product. If one has experience how to apply it.

But.... you don't know the product name in Hungarian.... So that is dead in the water for me. The locals already get uber confused by my western ideas. Even with local solutions, unless I know the actual Hungarian product name, I won't bother anymore.

Get back to me when you know the Hungarian name.... If you know that, with a link to how to video, I might give it a try..... Else, Loctite is something I know I can do and works... ;)

In other words, I am not a plumber. I need a solution that is easy, works, and I know that works. Am not interested in experimenting. Using two applications (some horse hair and sealant) may be one to many steps compared to a single application solution. It may work great for you, but if it goes wrong, who should I sue? The horse hair maker or the sealant maker? Too confusing...... Sorry.

klsallee :
fluffy2560 :
klsallee :

....
But sounds way too complicated to  me, when I know Loctite 577 just works.

Conversely,  it's locally available and it's the same thing used by plumbers all over Europe

I am sure it is a wonderful, natural product. If one has experience how to apply it.

But.... you don't know the product name in Hungarian.... So that dead in the water for me. The locals already get uber confused by my western ideas. Unless I know the actual Hungarian product name, I won't bother anymore.

Get back to me when you know the Hungarian name.... If you know that, with a link to how to video, I might give it a try..... Else, Loctite is something I know I can do and works... ;)

My secretarial and technical assistance services expire at 17h whereupon I become (more of) a pumpkin.  Besides it's nearly boarding time.

I think you can manage to find it in HU.   Look it up on obi.de an put the same product number in obi.hu.   Might work! If that fails, bauhaus.de an bauhaus.hu.  I'm pretty sure I've seen it there.

fluffy2560 :

My secretarial and technical assistance services expire at 17h whereupon I become (more of) a pumpkin.

And I am on an "independent" streak. If I can not get it by myself, without my human translator (and the one one my phone is fine for normal things but useless for construction and renovation), I default to what I know or what is on the shelf locally. :)

And what is on the shelf locally is pretty limited......  :(

They have Loctite 55. Wonder if that would work.....

klsallee :

[.....

And what is on the shelf locally is pretty limited......  :(

They have Loctite 55. Wonder if that would work.....

Secretarial and pipe sealing services resumed.....

Yes, Loctite 55 would work but it's only preformed locherpaste and hemp in a handy dispensing container for the splodging and slathering challenged.

You can also find the kit of hemp and locherpaste here (at Obi):

Fermit and Hemp

Hi everyone,

Thanks for replying!
So can anyone tell me how to start the process of buying a flat here in Budapest? As the agency that I'm buying from also have no renovation team!

And is it possible to buy second hand used furniture of kitchen here in Budapest? As I've noticed it's quite expensive here like costs more then 2 Million huf.. Just for kitchen renovation??

Yes I need to change the boiler, and gas convector to maybe latest technology, which consumes less gas, and reduce the gas bill as well!

I mean this info, I got from my agent, but since I can't speak Hungarian, so there is a communication barrier!

I know the lawyer can do all that permission paper thing, so I'm willing to have 1 soon, hopefully!

But getting those heating systems latest in good price, from where to start?

Also I'm willing to change the wooden floor, as it's really old and I want something long-lasting, especially easier to clean, without any gaps!

As in Greece, our home there is fully have ceramic tiles, which is so easy to clean up, but  agent told me, wooden floor will be best, but which type, even she has no info.

So I guess.. I'm totally lost, from where to select, buy on good price or cheap, even second hand good material, will be fine, I guess to start up with!

Need loads of help! 🙄🙄🙄🙄

Lilyrom :

....

Need loads of help! 🙄🙄🙄🙄

You've definitely jumped in at the deep end and it seems without a paddle.   

Finding anyone to do anything in Hungary is a real struggle at the moment.  We're still looking for people ourselves to do construction work in the garden - 2.5 years after our house was built.  We cannot even find a person to do the plans.

If you have gas convector heating in the walls of each room, you should replace it with a boiler.  However, as you are in an apartment, you're going to have to talk to the person who takes care of the building as you will either need your own gas chimney/flue and a hole in the wall or you need to connect to the building chimneys.    If you do anything with gas, you need permission from the gas company and you need a specialist gas planner (yes, you need a person who can do the paperwork for you - ridiculous but true). 

You could just get your floors relaid, then sanded, stained and varnished.  Should be warmer than tiles in the winter and could look good too if the wood is oak or something.  People pay plenty of money for wooden floors.  If it's that bad, you could lay some strong wooden panels down, screw them to the existing floor, then glue the tiles to the panels.  Sounds like bodging but it's what they would do.   If you do that, it could mess up your room levels. Personally I'd see if I could tidy up the existing floor boards by testing a patch to see what it could look like.  You can hire industrial sanders to do the job.

For 2nd hand stuff, jofogas.hu(click it).   You can buy a kitchen easily enough second hand but you need a carpenter to make it look correct.  It's not very difficult for a good DIY person to do.

If you have no skills, no tools and intend to hire people, you really need a Hungarian helper.  It will be nearly impossible on your own even to communicate with them.   Remember as soon as you open your mouth, speak English or whatever, but not Hungarian, the price will go up.

Yeah true, I thought it would be easy to buy a flat rather then staying in rental flats!

But seems in Hungary, nothing is easy, from top to bottom, needed someone Hungarian!

I do have some Hungarian friends, but majority of them have no idea, where to start from!?? As they never buy flat in their lives!

So that's I'm struggling so badly now! Everyone thinks whoever speaks English are multimillionaire or something!??? 😔😔

Lilyrom :

.....

I do have some Hungarian friends, but majority of them have no idea, where to start from!?? As they never buy flat in their lives!

So that's I'm struggling so badly now! Everyone thinks whoever speaks English are multimillionaire or something!??? 😔😔

Well, if they can speak Hungarian, your friends are already able to help you. 

Basically if you own a flat then you are a millionaire to them and if you are not speaking Hungarian, then you're likely to be ready for being ripped off.   Sorry to say it, but it's true.  Mrs Fluffy does all discussions with tradesmen. I never say anything because if they know I'm not a local, it'll be anywhere between 1/3 to 3 x more than anyone else will pay.  I only reveal myself when we know the price is reasonable.

BTW, if you have anywhere renovated, officially it has to be registered in a special database for tax purposes unless one pays these people off the books.  I don't know anything about that bit as the ever helpful Mrs Fluffy did the official database as we wanted bills so we had guarantees.  I stayed away from it.  But I could hear her swearing about what a nuisance it was from the other side of the house!

fluffy2560 :

If it's that bad, you could lay some strong wooden panels down, screw them to the existing floor, then glue the tiles to the panels.

The wood will contract and expand, the tile will not. Eventually you end up with tiles popping off.

One missing step: One needs to add a product between the wood and the tile to deal with this. Such as:

http://www.schluterditra.co.uk/schluter-ditra-25/

(In the USA, we use concrete backer board, but I have never seen this product in Hungary).

klsallee :
fluffy2560 :

If it's that bad, you could lay some strong wooden panels down, screw them to the existing floor, then glue the tiles to the panels.

The wood will contract and expand, the tile will not. Eventually you end up with tiles popping off.

One missing step: One needs to add a product between the wood and the tile to deal with this. Such as:

http://www.schluterditra.co.uk/schluter-ditra-25/

(In the USA, we use concrete backer board, but I have never seen this product in Hungary).

Yes, you're right, I forgot about that bit but it's possible to get flexible grout.

Personally I think wooden floors are cosier in a bedroom or a living room. Kitchen and bathroom tiles.

If it's an apartment, then probably it's got concrete floors underneath knowing the construction techniques in HU.

Backer board is not used in HU but it's possible maybe to use damp proofed dry wall but that's just messing around really.  Splurging on some levelling compound could help give a base.

fluffy2560 :

possible to get flexible grout.

Grout goes between the tiles. It is not the same as the adhesive to set the tiles. Yes, the adhesive is somewhat flexible, but not enough for wood underflooring.

fluffy2560 :

If it's an apartment, then probably it's got concrete floors underneath knowing the construction techniques in HU.

I agree. When ripping up a wood floor, I am sure there will be concrete underneath which is fine for direct tiling. But, tile is indeed cold. However, the product I linked to can be used to insert electrical heating as well to heat a tile floor. Kind of an expensive way to heat, but certainly an option.

fluffy2560 :

Backer board is not used in HU but it's possible maybe to use damp proofed dry wall but that's just messing around really.

All dry wall is covered in paper. "Damp proof" stuff is not a proper underlayment for tile. Yes, it has been done.... but doing it is a bad idea (always was). In may places it is not even allowed anymore by code even in a bathroom to lay tile over such material -- it should just be painted with a high quality water resistant paint. There are newer better products on the market for tiling. Even a worse idea to use it for flooring as the drywall can not take that much pressure, such as being walked on. It is called dry "wall" not dry "floor" for a reason.... :)

Wow, this is really a bad time to buy an apartment that needs renovation, ha! I'd very much recommend to buy a refurbished or new one, because having one refurbished might be a lot more expensive for you, considering that you don't speak the language,  also, your sanity might suffer.

Flats are already super costly anyways here, no matter how much you throw.
So that's why, I thought, it would be better to buy something reasonable, or around my budget, and agent told me, I might need to spend around 5 or 10 Million for renovating the whole flat!
Including all household furniture, electric wiring, water pipes maintenance etc.
But now I'm struggling, because I don't know where to start from?
Should I contact with any kind of cleaning or pest control company?? To make sure everything is clean, free of bugs or crawling insects etc. Such as bed bugs are quite common to hear here!
Or should I just start searching for renovation team or company, and leave on the contractor blindly??
As I want to spend on something which should not cost me later, by calling people again for fixing stuff etc.  :/  :huh:

Lilyrom :

Or should I just start searching for renovation team or company, and leave on the contractor blindly?

I think the general consensus here is you will not have much luck getting anyone to renovate. Those that have not left to get better wages in the West, are not available as they are working on larger construction projects.

The land agent can tell you all sorts of nonsense. They are only interested in selling the property. If it ends up costing you 40 million forint to renovate is not his problem. It is yours for "believing" him.

fluffy2560 :

Finding anyone to do anything in Hungary is a real struggle at the moment.  We're still looking for people ourselves to do construction work in the garden - 2.5 years after our house was built.  We cannot even find a person to do the plans.

They are all over in Austria :D

SimCityAT :
fluffy2560 :

Finding anyone to do anything in Hungary is a real struggle at the moment.  We're still looking for people ourselves to do construction work in the garden - 2.5 years after our house was built.  We cannot even find a person to do the plans.

They are all over in Austria :D

Yes, and they are all probably Hungarians as they've all gone from HU!

klsallee :
fluffy2560 :

possible to get flexible grout.

Grout goes between the tiles. It is not the same as the adhesive to set the tiles. Yes, the adhesive is somewhat flexible, but not enough for wood underflooring.

Yes, I know - I'm an amateur but not completely.   There are flexible grouts too but without more knowledge of the place, who knows what could work, we're all speculating.  It needs mastic up edges anyway. that allows for small amount of give.

klsallee :
fluffy2560 :

If it's an apartment, then probably it's got concrete floors underneath knowing the construction techniques in HU.

I agree. When ripping up a wood floor, I am sure there will be concrete underneath which is fine for direct tiling. But, tile is indeed cold. However, the product I linked to can be used to insert electrical heating as well to heat a tile floor. Kind of an expensive way to heat, but certainly an option.

Hmmmm....yes, electrical is an option but it takes time to heat up and may even need to say on for weeks. If it needs new heating, perhaps best thing is to install the insulated plastic forms, put the hot water pipes in, then lay a new floor (using Estrich - same name in HU) making sure to get the levels correct.   I looked at electrical underfloor heating once but at the time (>10 years), I couldn't find a supplier.  I have a kit in my shed for a 4m2 area - unused.

We have underfloor heating in the bathrooms and hallways (avoids having radiators but still need thermostats to make it work correctly).  If the OP really wants tiles, then as I said, check the wood. It might be salvageable if it's oak etc.  If it was a traditional kind of place, I'd try and keep it as it would be what people expect if the place was to be sold.

klsallee :
fluffy2560 :

Backer board is not used in HU but it's possible maybe to use damp proofed dry wall but that's just messing around really.

All dry wall is covered in paper. "Damp proof" stuff is not a proper underlayment for tile. Yes, it has been done.... but doing it is a bad idea (always was). In may places it is not even allowed anymore by code even in a bathroom to lay tile over such material -- it should just be painted with a high quality water resistant paint. There are newer better products on the market for tiling. Even a worse idea to use it for flooring as the drywall can not take that much pressure, such as being walked on. It is called dry "wall" not dry "floor" for a reason.... :)

Well not really exactly paper if done correctly as it can be finished appropriately. I think it could be OK at a push if the floor was strong enough to support it without flexing too much - tiles would distribute the load.   The plasterboard they sell in HU, AT and DE can be tiled directly.   It's got a thin plastic sheet in it and a "correct" side for tiling.  All the edges need finishing with a kind of rubbery coated tape which blended in.  If the edges are covered then maybe....Gipszkarton could work.       

I wouldn't put water resistant paint on the floor as it could create a damp problem. We don't know enough but maybe we're talking about is a rubbery latex type material (made by Mapei) which was used in our bathrooms.  This goes up the walls about say, 10cm, then is coated with a skim of a compound (Aquadefense - also by Mapei).

Fluffy, what is this 👉 rubbery latex type material (made by Mapei)?? And it can be be used for what?? What's the benefit of it?? Can we use this in bathroom and kitchen as well?

Lilyrom :

Fluffy, what is this 👉 rubbery latex type material (made by Mapei)?? And it can be be used for what?? What's the benefit of it?? Can we use this in bathroom and kitchen as well?

You can just click on blue highlighted text in my posting.  Then it will take you to the pages of the actual item.   The description on the web pages is also available in English. 

You can use it everywhere you need a waterproof base for tiles.  The rubbery stuff (actually butyl) is to stop the water from leaking under the tiles at the edges.  It's what they use here for showers/wet rooms.   

Mapei is just one company, others exist too!

fluffy2560 :

The plasterboard they sell in HU, AT and DE can be tiled directly.... maybe....Gipszkarton could work.

We might have a language problem. In USA English, plasterboard is gipszkarton and includes no plastic sheet in it. Greenboard is the plasterboard/gipszkarton used in bathrooms and should not be tiled. Note that Sheetrock is a trademarked product name for plasterboard from one maker. Exactly what product are your calling "plasterboard"? Link?

klsallee :
fluffy2560 :

The plasterboard they sell in HU, AT and DE can be tiled directly.... maybe....Gipszkarton could work.

We might have a language problem. In USA English, plasterboard is gipszkarton and includes no plastic sheet in it. Greenboard is the plasterboard/gipszkarton used in bathrooms and should not be tiled. Note that Sheetrock is a trademarked product name for plasterboard from one maker. Exactly what product are your calling "plasterboard"? Link?

Links were in the postings.

I'm using plasterboard in the context of gipszkarton but the variant that DOES have waterproofing in it.  That seems to similar to your greenboard description but it can be tiled on walls (normally).    Don't know about Sheetrock. 

I was actually wondering about this issue myself further and I think maybe the one you mentioned is what we call concrete boards but there are many variants for various purposes like sound proofing.   That would be much better than damp-proofed plasterboard.  The one that probably would work even better is marine ply screwed down but that would need to be perhaps 1/2" or 1" thick to give enough stiffness.  Then use the butyl sealant on it, the edging tape and up the sides

The absolute worst would be chipboard.  Tiny bit of moisture and it'll swell up and fall to bits.

fluffy2560 :
klsallee :
fluffy2560 :

The plasterboard they sell in HU, AT and DE can be tiled directly.... maybe....Gipszkarton could work.

We might have a language problem. In USA English, plasterboard is gipszkarton and includes no plastic sheet in it. Greenboard is the plasterboard/gipszkarton used in bathrooms and should not be tiled. Note that Sheetrock is a trademarked product name for plasterboard from one maker. Exactly what product are your calling "plasterboard"? Link?

Links were in the postings.

The link is to greenboard. There is no plastic layer in that. I have it as I used it in our bathroom (ceiling and toilet, but not around the tub which is tiled). If you have it, try to peal the layer back and find any "plastic" layer rather than Just a treated (impregnated/impregnált) cardboard layer on one side to make it water resistant, not water proof. Gluing tile to cardboard is a bad idea in all cases. And should definitely not be used for flooring.

Also see, regarding tiling "greenboard" plasterboard in a wet area (this expert says doing so is a national disaster and I agree with him - on a global scale):

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J19y7nGHM3c

Meanwhile, Abacus Backer board can be used for tiled wall and floors: But also something I have not personally seen in Hungary (but if someone knows of a distributor, do post it here):

https://www.rubberduckbathrooms.co.uk/a … ker-boards

Side note:

At the topic "What Is Greenboard Water Resistant Drywall?", under "Water Resistant Drywall vs. Cement Board":

drywall of any type can never be used for flooring applications.

And never use any type of drywall/plasterboard in a wet area, and never tile on it there:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J19y7nGHM3c&t=3m44s

Yes, it has been done. Too much. It is, and was, wrong. And it is a disaster.

Well, I've watched now lots of vids. On YouTube, how to renovate the bathroom!
All shows the ways to make it waterproof!
With cement board, green board or wedi board etc. Even they used something called waterproof membrane.. Company's name is Aqua defense should be done 2 or 3 coatings of it to make walls waterproof as well!
Seems I should give a try by myself.. If I. Ant find someone here! 😂😂😂
But the problem is, I don't know even from where to get all materials here in Budapest!

Lilyrom :

....ven they used something called waterproof membrane.. Company's name is Aqua defense should be done 2 or 3 coatings of it to make walls waterproof as well! ...
But the problem is, I don't know even from where to get all materials here in Budapest!

No, the company name is Mapei and the product is called AquaDefense.  There are others, not just Mapei.  Everyone has the same problem with finding out where to get stuff from - one just has to be adept at searching in Google. 

BTW, I know about Mapei as their HU HQ is in Budaors behind Burger King.  It's only about 7km from my house

klsallee :

Side note:

At the topic "What Is Greenboard Water Resistant Drywall?", under "Water Resistant Drywall vs. Cement Board":

drywall of any type can never be used for flooring applications.

And never use any type of drywall/plasterboard in a wet area, and never tile on it there:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J19y7nGHM3c&t=3m44s

Yes, it has been done. Too much. It is, and was, wrong. And it is a disaster.

I think the differing language, terminology, product knowledge and local standards are getting the better of us. 

The guy in the video is right but I think he's talking about the non-moisture proof stuff there which indeed would be madness to use in the way shown.  Certainly you can use plasterboard in bathrooms and tile on it.  But the real question is "which plasterboard?"

I didn't know the product was called "greenboard" but I know in the UK, it's referred to as  Gyproc (this is a specific British trade name).  I always thought it had a plastic sheet inside. I remember cutting some up and noticing a plastic layer - unless it was all a dream when I woke up in my plasterboarded shower.   I've got a spare sheet of it - I'll have to have a closer look.

As far as I know, there are different schools of thought which say you can tile on it directly or skim it with some plaster to provide additional protection.  Even the manufacturers says it's possible to tile on directly.

On the flooring, I think I tend to agree it would be pushing it to put it on the floor but perhaps the issue is securing it, tanking beforehand using the butyl sealant to give a good substrate.  Then the material itself, properly sealed would be less critical.     

I think the OP's main issue would be finding such semi-specialist products in a country where one doesn't speak the language and has no knowledge of the subject - the research would take ages.

BTW, one could just tile over existing tiles - just butyl seal them, taping the edges first and glue the tiles down as usual.   Save time and wouldn't have to scrape off the previous adhesive.  Or is it too much bodging/kontar behaviour?

So, regarding kitchen here in Budapest... Is there something beside ikea??
As I like to cook and clean more often, and I noticed ikeas wooden base is not strong enough, don't know why?

As where I'm staying in rental flat, wooden coffee tables are chip off, powder bathroom furniture is non waterproof... All are from ikea!!!

So I think the quality of ikeas furniture especially for long run is not suitable maybe??

I should try to find something that will last longer atleast for 15 years or so! Changing furniture is not a good option here!

fluffy2560 :

Certainly you can use plasterboard in bathrooms and tile on it.  But the real question is "which plasterboard?"

One should only use Greenboard or better in bathrooms.

fluffy2560 :

there are different schools of thought which say you can tile on it directly or skim it with some plaster to provide additional protection.  Even the manufacturers says it's possible to tile on directly.

Yes. One can tile on plasterboard. And of course the manufaturer will say it is possible to sell as much as possible. And there are also different schools of thought about everything. Some say the earth is flat, for example. Or that one should use mud to build a house in the traditional method in Hungary (did you build your house using mud or modern materials?).

In the end, every really honest professional will tell you to NOT tile on plasterboard. Simply because there are better technologies available. Even in Hungary. Don't downgrade. I already gave a link to a product available in Hungary which can be used for floors or walls.

fluffy2560 :

I think the OP's main issue would be finding such semi-specialist products in a country where one doesn't speak the language and has no knowledge of the subject - the research would take ages.

See above. I already provided a product that will work. All info available in English. Product available in Hungary. No more research needed as I already spent a really, really long time doing all the research.....  I can recommend this product. :D

Lilyrom :

So, regarding kitchen here in Budapest... Is there something beside ikea??

Plenty. Search for "konyhaszekrény".

There are also custom cabinet makers in Hungary.

If you clean a lot, maybe also simply consider stainless steel counters and cabinets.

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