surrender of indian nationality - Date of nationality being granted

Hello
I am planning to surrender my Indian nationality and the embassy requires a proof of belgium nationality certificate. I got the document "ATTEST VAN BELGISCHE NATIONALITEIT".
Is this good enough, it does not state the date on which Belgian nationality was awarded. It just states that I am Belgian. Does the embassy ask for the exact date ?

Hello,

All Belgian official documents automatically carry a date of issue and an official stamp.

Now, what does it matter when you got Belgian nationality? You have the Belgian official document declaring you a Belgian citizen. That will be enough for your embassy.

But personal question, why not stay with dual nationality?

Dual nationality is pretty hard for Indian peoples. Many countries still do not recognized it, such as India (same for Singapore, Indonesia, Vietnam, China, ...)
But not recognized doesn't mean you've to surrender your current nationality to only have one.
Unless your government force you to only have one nationality, such as Singapore, you're fine. Just don't say it :)


I had similar cases in the past with several colleagues (and mix couples with children), they've just kept both of their passports:
In India they're Indian.
In Belgium they're Belgian
Elsewhere, they decide which passport they want to use.


I agree with phipiemar, as long as you've received your Belgian ID card and, maybe, the certificate that the nationality has been granted, there should be no other proof to give to your embassy if you really want to do it.

The Indian embassy specially asked for this. I went to the city hall and got an appointment for the population register. Then in my natiionalitiet bewijs they wrote the exact date the naturalization was granted and put a stamp.

Thanks for the info. I’m kind of surprised someone would do like this. For example you leave Belgium with a Belgian passport and you get your landing immigration stamp on your Indian passport and you return to Belgium using your Belgian passport. That would definitely raise some alarms I would believe

Thanks for the info. I’m kind of surprised someone would do like this. For example you leave Belgium with a Belgian passport and you get your landing immigration stamp on your Indian passport and you return to Belgium using your Belgian passport. That would definitely raise some alarms I would believe

Tubeloid :

Thanks for the info. I’m kind of surprised someone would do like this. For example you leave Belgium with a Belgian passport and you get your landing immigration stamp on your Indian passport and you return to Belgium using your Belgian passport. That would definitely raise some alarms I would believe

Hi,

Not necessarely. My wife is brasilian with F+ card. When she travels to Brasil from Brussels airport, they just check if she's got all documents. And when she's in Brasil, she shows her brazilian passport.

There's no alarm at all, unless you don't go IN and OUT of a country with the [b]same passport[/b]!
That's the goal to have multiple nationalities (and so multiple passports)


Now, just think about the children of mixed couples ( = 2 different countries through the parents).
In my specific case, if my Vietnamese girlfriend got pregnant (if we're lucky  :D), we'll have multiple choices for our child:
* only Vietnamese citizenship (because of the mother AND if I don't recognize my child)
* only Belgian citizenship (because of me, as Belgian AND if she doesn't recognize her OWN child, ok something's wrong there if she doesn't recognize her own child, I agree lol..., or if she decide to not tell Vietnam authorities/embassy)
* both nationalities (because we both recognized the child + because Belgium allows multiple nationalities)

If we picks the both nationalities choice, our child would be Vietnamese in Vietnam ONLY, and Belgian in Belgium ONLY. Elsewhere we (he/she after 18 years old) decide which passport we (he/she) want.
And of course, as you can imagine, we would pick the Belgian one as it offers WAY more advantages than the Vietnamese one... which is just a bit less powerful than your Indian passport)
In this specific case, Vietnam would allow our child to have 2 nationalities as the blood has been mixed, specific laws of Vietnam. But no matter what, Vietnam will only consider our child Vietnamese first in Vietnam, and Belgium will only say the child is Belgian in Belgium)
In my SPECIFIC case, the mother has to recognized our child as Vietnamese first when he get borned, THEN say I will say that the child is mine after he's Vietnamese, so our child will have both nationalities. (as Belgium allows multiple nationalities).
If I say FIRST, that the child is Belgian, he will never get Vietnamese citizenship, stupid specific laws...)
Now you should start reading Indian laws about it... damn right!


My 2 nieces are in the same cases as they've both Americans & Belgians citizenship.
They live in America, but when they go in Europe, they just show their Belgian ID card/Belgian passport and no one will ever try to bother them.
When they go back in America, they show their US ID card/USA passport and no one give a damn.
They don't need to proof they'll go back in America where they live, as they're Belgian when they come in Belgium and American when they go back in America (so they don't need to proof they'll go back to their country through flight tickets, neither financial proof to cover their stay!)


When they travel elsewhere in the world, they just picks the convenient passport with visa-free access.




A colleague of mine has 4 passports: Iran, South Africa, UK and Belgium (through mixed parents (Iran/South Africa) + residentship later in UK + naturalization in UK then in Belgium).
He can pick which passport he wants when he travels and he can chose the best one depending on what he's doing.
He just needs to pay each passports he want when he needs to renew them.



Ok, Belgian passport is definitely more powerful than an Indian one... that's true.
But if you give up your Indian passport, it might be hard for you to get back in your country later if you want!

You should read nomad capitalist articles about dual/multiple citizen ship: https://nomadcapitalist.com/second-passport/
You'll understand way more about why getting multiple nationalities is pretty great (travels/tax/else ...)

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