New members of the Germany forum, introduce yourselves here - 2019

Don‘t waste your time searching for a rental before you arrive - it won‘t work!
Also, loosen your requirements (e.g. from „at Flugfeld Böblingen or around that area“ to „anywhere between Stuttgart and Herrenberg“ to have a chance.
Also, although you did not mention it, many foreigners plan on (or rather dream of) furnished apartments, which are almost absent in the German market. There is an Ikea at Sindelfingen and a few thousand Euros will give you what you need without the headache of searching for a needle in a haystack (and then paying an arm and a leg for it).
Good luck and patience are your most needed virtues now!

Thank you so much for your reply. I agree with you on the furnishing for the apartment and prefer unfurnished.
My concern is that i have just 2 weeks to finalize on my flat. Do you think it is possible??? and do you know which agents or sites do you think is the best to approach knowing my tight timeline. i do have a close relative who is a german and could do the formalities or book before i arrive.

Two weeks is probably too short!
The minimum notice period for termination of a rental contract is three months (by law!) and most properties are advertised (and in high demand areas like around Stuttgart quickly taken) soon after that. So you usually have to sign the rental many weeks before you move in.
Perhaps it‘s better you arrange temporary housing (hotel, B&B or serviced apartment) to cover this period.

Thank you for your quick response.

Hi
I'm has!
I'm considering buying a property in germany.

It needs cosmetically updating then I Will lease  the shop and rent out apartment above.

Any advice on renovation laws if any?

These matters are quite complicated and vary from location to location.
You should consult the local building authority BEFORE you buy and a knowledgeable expert (e.g. an architect) before you start any improvement project. Many changes need prior permit and it is not clear to a layman which ones do!

Thanks again!
Your replies are very helpful
😊

My name is Dj Ali Kachal (Bold in Persian)
I am Percussionist play :  Conga, Bongo, Cajon, Darbuka, Djembe & Toumbak(Zarb)
I am Persian and I come from Iran, Shiraz

Can speak in English, German, Persian, Arabic and Hindi.

Love to meet different people and cultures.   :top:

Prefer a German friend for improving my German Language  :)

Hello!
I am German with an English husband and we have been expats in Switzerland for the last 10 years. We are about to move to Germany, Lüneburg in the summer. For me that will be a return home. For Paul, my husband, that will be a new adventure. I am a teacher and he is an artist. We have two children (9 & 2) who will make Lüneburg their new home as well. You are English speaking? And would like to meet a binational family? Wir sprechen auch gerne und gut Deutsch! :) I just decided to post in English to make us more accessible... Than we would love to hear from you. Thanks for accepting us into this network!
Cheers
Nina

Hallo,

This letter is to introduce myself and to let you know of my interest in becoming a part of your company. I am a master graduate (M.S.) with 11.5 years of strong experience in Automotive field.

As an analytical and dynamic individual who has a proven history of exceeding expectations through performance, I believe, I would be able to participate and impact considerably the ongoing operational success of your company. Some of the key talents, I can bring include Continuous Process Improvement, Creativity, Quality Management, Time Management, Teamwork, Production Planning, Target Achieving, People Management, Handling Change Management Request, Bill of Materials & Engineering Drawings.

My high degree of motivation has been recognized by my previous employer General Motors Technical Centre India Pvt. Ltd. (GM), who have quickly promoted me to positions of greater responsibility “HFV6 Engine Lead Engineer” (Single point of contact globally – USA, Germany, Korea). In each of my previous job experiences, I have performed my assignments with a high degree of skill and professionalism.

I am confident that my skills will be an asset and have a favorable impact in your company. I firmly believe that I can make a positive contribution to your company and I have enclosed my resume to provide more information on my skills and experience. I would welcome the opportunity for an in-depth discussion and I will make myself available at your first convenience.

Thank you for your review and consideration. I look forward to hearing from you soon.

Pravin Jenish: I think you misunderstand the purpose of this forum. It is for exchanging advice and experiences among expats in Germany. It is not for finding or applying for jobs, although there are plenty of discussions about how to best do that (which I recommend you to read and follow!).
It is inappropriate to post an unedited cover letter here. But since you did, my opinion after glancing over it: You should preferably write in German if applying at German companies (assuming you speak the language, without which your chances are low anyway) and refer more directly to the company‘s needs and wants (gathered from job ads or your own research) and how you would address them with your skills. A generic cover letter like yours above will not achieve much in Germany.

Hello
I hope you are all fine. I intend to migrate in Germany. I was wondering how life would be over there in terms of children schooling, work, health services and cost of living.
Thanks

Hi new pals, i'm Adam, just moved to Dresden from London (uk) for a 6-month stay, working at the TU Dresden.

It would be great if anyone has advice on two things I'm really keen to do whilst I'm here - climbing and learning German.

I have discovered climbing in the past couple of years so I'm thrilled to be so close to the Sächsiche Schweiz. If anyone wants a climbing buddy or knows of groups that climb, please put me in touch!

Then the second thing is learning German. I know some of the basics of the language but I'm at that point where I just need to start hearing it and speaking it. Can anyone recommend a language school that would do say weekly classes, or even better a way to find speaking partners to meet up an just talk with?

Then lastly if anyone is interested in just generally hanging out and exploring the city - look me up!

Hi, Deniz Tozar from Turkey. Nearly 1,5 years ago I moved to Hamburg. Working in Rellingen as Sales Manager for Renewable Energy sector.

I learn German, and running as free time activities. Don't hesitate to say 'hi' to keep in touch, cause life sometimes really boring here :(

beppi :

Pravin Jenish: I think you misunderstand the purpose of this forum. It is for exchanging advice and experiences among expats in Germany. It is not for finding or applying for jobs, although there are plenty of discussions about how to best do that (which I recommend you to read and follow!).
It is inappropriate to post an unedited cover letter here. But since you did, my opinion after glancing over it: You should preferably write in German if applying at German companies (assuming you speak the language, without which your chances are low anyway) and refer more directly to the company‘s needs and wants (gathered from job ads or your own research) and how you would address them with your skills. A generic cover letter like yours above will not achieve much in Germany.

Beppi is correct that this doesn't belong posted on this forum. But despite this, as Beppi did, I will make some comments as it is obviously a letter intended for a prospective employer. Being creative and good at time management etc. is fine and good but short of being specific about technical qualifications. You mention having a masters but in what subject??? One could have worked for GM and have a degree in engineering or say in marketing. The specific qualifications in education and work as well as your specific job intentions are important. You need to know about the company you are applying to and address their needs. 

And as Beppi mentioned, German is spoken in Germany. If one can’t speak the language or even inquire with a translated letter then it is probably eliminating you from most job opportunities. There might be an exception for someone with an advanced degree offering skill in great demand in Germany. And this brings up the other factor; can you get a job permit? A company can only bring in a non EU-citizen if they cannot find qualified workers within the EU. Thus it is not necessarily the level of one’s education but the market demand for their skills.  Even a doctor title is not enough in fields where there is not the demand.

Hi, I will be moving to Berlin in September. Would like to meet new people there. and yeah one thing i would ask, Its difficult to find accommodation. anyone who would like to help me out.

Hallo
Alles gut?
Yes i am new here in germeny but i am very depressed because they send me in schneeberg azylum camp

And personalyy i am doing a business of stainless steel sheet which is used to make cutlery utensils

But the life of the camp is not good for me and my family i wish to move me and my family to a big town where we start our life easily
Could you help me in this matter

Moonahassan: Your profile indicates that you are German citizen. I assume that is incorrect.
If you applied for political asylum, and thus want Germany to protect you from persecution at home, you must follow the German procedures for this, which involves a lengthy investigation during which you have to stay in a provided accommodation (camp) and cannot work. But at least you are safe!
However, if your real intention is not escaping prosecution, but doing business or working, you should cancel the asylum application and get a business or work visa instead. With that, you can do what you want and move anywhere.

Hello all! I’m new to all of this, so please forgive any ignorance. My wife and are starting to consider expatriating and moving to Germany. I’ve worked construction and have knowledge of roofing, primarily. I’m currently a truck driver. My wife is an artist and is currently a well respected tattoo artist in our area. I speak German fairly fluently, but my written German and my knowledge of grammar rules have left my memory almost entirely. My wife speaks almost no German.

Where do we start our research? What are the job prospects for us, do you think? And with her being a tattoo artist we’re thinking Berlin or Dresden might be the best fit but are willing to look anywhere in the north east or west. Thank you for replying!

RyanG: Welcome to the forum.
In the construction field, good German is optional as all your colleagues will be foreigners, too. However, roofing is a restricted profession and you'll need at least a completed apprenticeship (equivalent to a German "Geselle" title). In addition, you'll earn very little - the legal minimum wage of €9/hour is not universally enforced. On the positive side, the construction industry is booming and there are jobs aplenty.
Trucking (even if you have a license for Germany) is so full of cheap Eastern European drivers and has such bad working conditions that I'd not recommend getting into this if you have a choice.
Tattooing probably also needs recogniosed (sanitary) certifications. Since the industry consists mostly of small, owner-operated shops with no employees, she'd probably have to start her own business (which is difficult for an outsider). Also, to understand the wishes of her customers, near perfect German is required.
Last not least, you will probably not get a work permit based on the professions above. Do you already have a residence visa for Germany, or what do you want to base it on?

beppi :

RyanG:
Tattooing probably also needs recogniosed (sanitary) certifications. Since the industry consists mostly of small, owner-operated shops with no employees, she'd probably have to start her own business (which is difficult for an outsider). Also, to understand the wishes of her customers, near perfect German is required.
Last not least, you will probably not get a work permit based on the professions above. Do you already have a residence visa for Germany, or what do you want to base it on?

The popularity of tattoos has exploded as have the shops offering them. I literally have 4 such places within 200 meters of my apartment! But one needn’t think that they would be limited to just a few large cities; they can be done anywhere. And while Beppi is right that most places are small operations, I think this is actually an opportunity for someone not ready to open their own place. When a small operation gets overly busy then they’re going to look for part time help – which could lead to full time. The main question will probably be if they have enough space and equipment. If so, it is optimal for them to put it to use. The other thing is that each artist has their own style. Finding someone who expands the offerings is a good market strategy. And I think the bottom line is artistic skill and being dependable and easy to work with rather than speaking much German at the beginning. For customers that don’t speak good English then everything would just have to be organized by the boss as to what is to be done but the work itself isn’t dependent on speaking German.

I agree with Beppi’s opinion that construction and driving jobs are probably readily available but often badly paid and mostly fulfilled by eastern Europeans. Until now the rules were that for a non-EU citizen to get a work permit that the employers had to prove they didn’t have enough qualified candidates. A brand new immigration law has been agreed to that is changing this requirement for positions needing University degrees and some types of vocational training. But I don’t know exactly when the law takes effect and if any of the intended work options would fall under these rules.

Hi everyone, my name is Juan and I want to move to Germany but I haven't got a work visa yet. I am from Colombia and I speak English, I am also learning German. Is it hard to get it from my home country?? what would you recommend to me ?

I'd recommend you apply for jobs at suitable employers in your industry first.
Once you have a job offer, you can apply for a work visa.
Ypour chances increase with your language ability - for all jobs involving communication a level of B2 - C is usually required.

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