I'm looking for ways to migrate to Germany, any recommendation?

Hi everyone,

Let me introduce my situation briefly. I am a 27 year old male from a south-east asia country. I have always been looking for ways to leave my country and migrate to a more developed and open-minded country, for my sexual orientation reason. It is simply not possible to live my life openly in where I am now. I went for a master degree in finance in France several years ago, for the same reason. But in the end, I failed to get any job there due to my lack of French language (my french is intermediate). So in the end I had to return home. During my last year there, I tried to look for au pair opportunity everywhere in Europe, but I didn't get any, since it's difficult to get an au pair opportunity as a male. Since my family is so poor, and I haven't even been able to get a job since returning, I have zero money and cannot simply move away.

I have just recently discovered  FSJ/BFD and ausbildung in Germany. I have done my research on what are they, somewhat. I know that it's impossible for me to apply for FSJ, since I'm more than 26 y.o. So my chances are  BFD and ausbildung.
As what I've learned, BFD is a voluntary service and ausbildung is a vocational training, and the recommended path is to apply for BFD first and then possibly apply for ausbildung later.

My end goal is to be able to live in Germany permanently. I need that permanent residence.

I am educated, and I have some work experience on finance as well. It would be amazing if somehow I can use my background to find work there, but I don't mind if I have to work in a restaurant. For me, that would still be so much better than living closeted and always being afraid of getting caught all the time.
Though if I have to study in a college again, I would like to learn programming (I'm not sure if that's aligned with the ausbildung).

So, what path should I take to get the permanent resident? (Since as far as I know, I need to stay for 5 consecutive years in Germany to be able to get one.)
Is BFD (1 year) - ausbildung (3 years) - and another study (3 years) a feasible path for me to study and still work enough to earn for living? or is there a better way?

do you have recommendation for the BFD/ausbildung which at least give me enough money to be able to eat and live? and It would be so much better if the trager could pay for my flight ticket first, and then I would repay them later with my salary.
For BFD; I am hoping to get a voluntary for kindergarten, since I love kids.

Any suggestion and advice is appreciated.
Thank you

You said you have no financial reserves. That will be a major hindrance, as none of the options you mentioned would pay for your trip and/or incidental expenses.
BFD is considered volunteering. It pays a small pocket money (approx. €400/month) and usually room and board. You can survive on this, but are at or near the poverty level.
An apprenticeship (Ausbildung) pays a small stipend, too. The amount depends on the profession you learn and can be from far below what you need to survive to somewhat above.
As a university student, you have to cover all expenses from your own pocket - and yyou cannot expect to earn your living expenses from the limited ampount of work you are allowed to do at the side - and you need to focus full-time on your studies to get good results!
In all three cases, you need to apply at suitable places (charities, training companies or schools, universities) and hope to be accepted, which won't be easy as a non-EU foreigner who is not yet present in Germany.
In addition:

the25thbam :

But in the end, I failed to get any job there due to my lack of French language

The same fate will befall you here, unless you speak the language well. What is your level here? I recommend you get to B2 or better C1 (required for university access and most other places) before you try.
Besides, I do not think time spent in Germany as volunteer or in education couts fully towards permanent residency. But I may be wrong here. Check with the Ausländeramt in the place you relocate to!
Good luck!

Your profile says you are Icelander (currently living in Indonesia). You should correct this if it is wrong.
Instead of Germany, it may be easier for you to relocate to Singapore, which is nearer, has a similar culture (but far less discrimination based on sexual orientation), speaks English and is far easier to move to.

Like Beppi mentioned, volunteering is a temporary way to get by and learn the language but it doesn’t really pay more than enough to survive. Au pair jobs are even worse paid and the focus is to learn German, plus the age limit is also 26 and like you found out not many people will be looking for a male au pair although I’m sure there have been some.

But Beppi is also right about the language problem. This seems to have been your problem in France but the situation will NOT be better in Germany. To have hope to get a professional job and settle in Germany one has to learn the language well, which is not easier than French. I don’t know why you don’t concentrate on improving your French rather than trying to start a new language like German. There are a few niche jobs like IT where foreigners can get hired without having good German, if they speak excellent English. But I doubt this will apply in Finance and without good German one is eliminating 98% of job opportunities from the start.

And the whole idea of trying to relocate with no savings is not likely to work out. Another good point Beppi made is that volunteer work, au pair jobs and apprenticeships do not count towards the residency requirements for permeant residency. You should look carefully at the German Immigration Authority (BAMF) website for details about such things.

It's intentional. Because if I put my real data, people who know me can put 2 and 2 together and figure out that it was me.
As far as I know the only possible way to migrate to Singapore is to get a professional job, which then the company should be willing to sponsor my visa. In my background with my not enough experience, it's very difficult to get one. I have applied for many jobs in Singapore but zero response so far.

Wow that is such a dream-killer.  :sosad:

I was planning to get a job here first while also learning the language. I can barely undeestand Deutsch at the moment. Though the language requirement to get a BFD visa is only A1 level, I do realize that itsnot sufficient to get by there.
I have watched and read vlogs and blogs from people from my country who followed the aupair-fsj/bfd-ausbildung path. They did say that they're not earning much, but it's enough to survive. So that's where I had the idea from.

After I finished my master, I stayed in France to learn the language. Since my master was taught in full English, I went there without speaking any French. But I wasn't able to afford living there, since I lived in a small city and wasn't able to get even a part time job. That's why I had to return. I don't think there is a way such BFD and ausbildung in France, so that's why I was thinking of coming to Germany.

I was planning to work here first for a bit to earn enough money while also learning the language. But it's such a bummer to know that BFD and ausbildung don't count toward permanent residency. :(

The formal language requirement for BFD might be A1 (and there is none for vocational training), but you have to find a place that accepts you and most of them probably want more, since such places are usually in social settings and you'd have to communicate with people. It's an applicatiuon process not unlike looking for a job.
Believe me, it is far easier to move to Singapore (e.g. as a student), or to France with some language knowledge, than to Germany without any. The Alliance Francaise also offers language classes in Jakarta, just like the Goethe Institute does.

the25thbam :

After I finished my master, I stayed in France to learn the language. Since my master was taught in full English, I went there without speaking any French. But I wasn't able to afford living there, since I lived in a small city and wasn't able to get even a part time job. That's why I had to return. I don't think there is a way such BFD and ausbildung in France, so that's why I was thinking of coming to Germany.

I was planning to work here first for a bit to earn enough money while also learning the language. But it's such a bummer to know that BFD and ausbildung don't count toward permanent residency. :(

This highlights the downside of actually getting an English taught program in a country that uses a different language. It’s OK if one returns home or goes to an English speaking country to work but short-sided if one wants to stay in the country they studied in. But your explanation still doesn’t really explain how coming to Germany would have any advantage to improving your French since you already speak some and have lived in the country. To realistically get professional work and/or get permanent residency one has to learn fairly decent German. And since you already speak English then why not try for employment in Australia or New Zealand? Both are closer to you.

Okay, thank you. I guess if I am really gonna follow this path, I will prepare my Deutsch seriously.

I'm not trying to improve my French in Germany though, I fully understand that I need to speak Deutsch if I wanna live there.
Actually, I was planning to go to Australia too, with a work and holiday visa, but I couldn't follow through because they required me to have at least AUD 5000. And unfortunately, being a citizen of a poor country, not many countries want us to come to them. So that's another constraint.
Anyway, thank you. At least I was trying to improve my life, I guess.

Sorry, but if you don’t have AUD5000 (approx. EUR3000), you should not attempt to come to Europe: Your incidental expenses (flight, temporary accommodation until you find a place to rent, rental deposit, furnishings and household goods, first months living expenses until you receive your income) are likely to be far higher. There is a good reason why the German authorities require anyone coming to Germany to have EUR9000 or more!
If you are serious, I recommend you work in your country for a few years while saving as much as possible and attending German classes at the Goethe Institute - and only come to Germany once you have enough money and language skills.

Can I also add to Beppi and Tom's valued advise.

The cost of living in Germany is a lot higher than what it is in France.

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