a disappointed english teacher

is it really difficult for a qualified english teacher from india to get a decent job in the university in riyadh?
I must have searched n number of websites in order to find a good teaching job for myself but to my disapointment i found that all the good packages are only for native speakers. This is so disheartening. Ispite of having the qualification and the experience required and ofcourse the zeal to teach i haven't come accross anything that would catch my fancy. is there anyone who could tell me what to do?

They forgot you tell you skin transplant is mandatory.
It seems that this discrimination is not only where you are, but where i am as well in Vietnam.
Lets hear from others from the other corners of the earth.
Even the different rate of pay between a native and others (if they manage to secure anything).

normally when they want an English teacher.....they would happen to come from a country that speaks mainly English.  not as a second language to keep accents out of it. 

thought it was common sense

yasmin khan wrote:

I must have searched n number of websites in order to find a good teaching job for myself but to my disapointment i found that all the good packages are only for native speakers. This is so disheartening. Ispite of having the qualification and the experience required and ofcourse the zeal to teach i haven't come accross anything that would catch my fancy.

Fact is, native-speaking EFL teachers earn more than their non-native peers.  After all, the target language is their L1.  Moreover, those "good packages" are used to entice teachers from the US, UK, Canada, etc., especially those holding university degrees from their home countries.  It's all about supply and demand.

As an Indian, you'll have to lower your expectations to a realistic level and accept that you won't earn the same big money and bennies.  Holding out for a university TEFL job that "catches your fancy" will only cause you more frustration.  But if you truly have the "zeal to teach," then find out how you can get hired as a local.  That may entail working under a company contracted at your target university.  Also consider joining KSAALT and/or signing up for workshops with the British Council and doing some networking.  That might help you land a teaching job at one of the local universities.

You hit the nail on the head with that post smurfette couldn't have said it better...well done :D

what is important? Right knowledge about the subject or accent? If the native speakers are hired just because of their accent then don't u think the future of the students is in total darkness? Knowledge was and is never at the mercy of the so-called accent of native speakers.  Had it been the criteria then the schools and colleges offering english language courses to teach the rules of the language
would have shut down in their own country itself. I don't hold any grudge against the native speakers but just asking for a fair treatment to be given to the qualified teachers whether native or non-native because when a student will ask the difference between perfect tense and perfect continuous tense and if he doesn't get a satisfactory answer the accent will go out of the window and the teacher probably out of school.

You can try and reason and argue all you want.

Facts are facts

yasmin khan wrote:

what is important? Right knowledge about the subject or accent? If the native speakers are hired just because of their accent then don't u think the future of the students is in total darkness? Knowledge was and is never at the mercy of the so-called accent of native speakers.  Had it been the criteria then the schools and colleges offering english language courses to teach the rules of the language would have shut down in their own country itself. I don't hold any grudge against the native speakers but just asking for a fair treatment to be given to the qualified teachers whether native or non-native because when a student will ask the difference between perfect tense and perfect continuous tense and if he doesn't get a satisfactory answer the accent will go out of the window and the teacher probably out of school.

Supply and demand---students prefer native English-speaking teachers.  This is particularly important for those who expect to continue their university studies in an English-speaking country. 

But we native speakers aren't solely preferred because of our accents.  We also know how to use written and spoken English within an authentic, socio-cultural context. (TEFL isn't just about regurgitating grammar rules, which, by the way, don't always fit every communication situation.)  Ironically, as a native speaker, I'm also often called upon to proof quizzes/tests and teaching materials written by my non-native colleagues to make sure the language is used accurately and is clear.  It's extra work on top of my own responsibilities. (No offense, but I had to read your post more than twice to understand it.)

Additionally, quite a few of us hold TEFL-related degrees (mine is an MA in Teaching and included a teaching practicum in ESL) so we're quite capable of teaching grammar.  Moreover, throughout the academic year, all the teachers---native and non-native speakers---are observed and evaluated to ensure we know what we're doing.  Perhaps that wasn't your experience where you previously taught.

They OWN the schools. They call the shots. They make their OWN rules. Fortunately, it is still called  English! But definitely the NATIVE part is out of place
:|

(No offense, but I had to read your post more than twice to understand it.)
loool Loving it
I donít think that she will be offended, maybe OUTRAGED or ABSOULOTLY FURIOUS !!! (Thatís Dr.Evil me talking looool). Thank God That I know that my English sucks.:D

Now lets talk seriously, I agree with Smurfette, itís not only about being a native speaker or  about the accent .Imagining having Vicky Pollard as your English teacher just for her being a Brit.

This is exactly what happens when someone tries to show a mirror. Instead of accepting the fact they either start a blame-game or start finding faults with others.
Kindly don't worry about the system of evaluating teachers in my school, as the recruiters know whom they have appointed.  I think teachers are frequently evaluated in those institutions where the authorities are unsure of their teachers as it is in your school. I know it must be very frustrating for you to prove yourself everytime  and with that additional responsibility of proof reading the teaching material (not materials, no offense meant), must be getting worst out there day by day.
Thanks for agreeing with me that only a few native speakers are qualified and not all.
Please don't begin a sentence with a conjunction (No offense meant)

I am going to refrain from even touching on the native/non-native conversation we got going on here and say... have you looked into any of the international schools?  Perhaps, you would find what you are looking for... that is if you haven't already looked there.  Good luck with your quest!

Thanks, i'll do so. Please suggest good international schools in riyadh. I know it's all on the net, but, personal experience does count.

yasmin khan wrote:

This is exactly what happens when someone tries to show a mirror. Instead of accepting the fact they either start a blame-game or start finding faults with others.

Kindly don't worry about the system of evaluating teachers in my school, as the recruiters know whom they have appointed.  I think teachers are frequently evaluated in those institutions where the authorities are unsure of their teachers as it is in your school. I know it must be very frustrating for you to prove yourself everytime  and with that additional responsibility of proof reading the teaching material (not materials, no offense meant), must be getting worst out there day by day.
Thanks for agreeing with me that only a few native speakers are qualified and not all.
Please don't begin a sentence with a conjunction (No offense meant)

This native vs. non-native hooplah is moot; there are good and bad teachers of every stripe.  As a native speaker, I'm no better than my teaching colleagues.  Yet, we all share the same goal of providing the best language learning experience for our students.  That's what's important.

No need to get defensive---it serves no purpose if your objective is to land a good job.  Anyway, if you re-read my initial post, I'd kindly provided the following advice:

...find out how you can get hired as a local. That may entail working under a company contracted at your target university.  Also consider joining KSAALT and/or signing up for workshops with the British Council and doing some networking.  That might help you land a teaching job at one of the local universities.

Good luck.  I truly hope you find a suitable teaching position.

Thanks smurfette. I totally agree with you, this is going nowhere. In all humility I apologise.

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