Driving in the Philippines

Hi,

What do you think of the way people drive in the Philippines? How different is it from your home country?

Respecting the road safety rules, driving etiquette such as general courtesy, speed excess… what are the characteristics of the driving style in the Philippines?

Share with us the difficulties one may face when driving in the Philippines: peak hours, road conditions, accident, etc. and your advice to drive safely in the country.

Thank you in advance for participating,

Maximilien

Respecting the road safety rules ?

From UK to Australian Driving and then to the Philippines... Talk about a down hill run...

Pedestrian crossings. The driver will honk his horn to tell a pedestrian on the crossing to get out of his way.

Who has right of way ?  After some months here, I now know that answer.  The biggest vehicle...

I've just had a 3 hour drive, with local driver, in Manila.  No accidents that I saw, but observing rules ??

We did a U-turn on a major road with a concrete divider.  Kids had broken the concrete the concrete so cars could u-turn at that point.  They also stood in front of oncoming traffic so the other cars could get rounds "safely", the drivers pay them some coins for the "service".

Driving in Manila ??  Pay a driver !!

I drive here in the Philippines almost on a daily basis, I am from the USA, and to say their driving habits are different would be a gross understatement. Every time you think you have seen it all, something new happens. They don't look, rarely signal, and do some of the most dangerous thing imaginable. I have ridden in Taxis and watch the taxi drivers show no emotion after they are cut off, forced out of the lane they were in by another driver. It is just accepted. People here have no respect for the other person, their attitude is "me first", after a while you adapt the same style. They are extremely pushy, ie if you stop at a detour on the highway, it is normal for them to pass you after the road opens up, or at least try.

Having lived in and driven in other developing nations was helpful as the chaos experienced elsewhere prepared me for the unique brand of highway chaos in the Philippines. Patience and strict attention to the road and who and what surrounds your vehicle is vital to the survival of your vehicle if not you and your passengers. Road rules are nearly non-existent and it seems to be every man for himself.
That being said I have become somewhat accustomed to the chaos do not get in a hurry. The motorcycle drivers seem to have no respect for their own lives, their passengers or you and drive as though with a death wish. Buses and jeepney's will quite literally pull right out in front of you or try and push you into oncoming traffic lanes to get back into the traffic flow from a passenger pickup stop. Left and right turns are made from any lane desired and leaving any gap in between you and the vehicle in front of you, no matter how small is an open invitation for any sized vehicle to squeeze in and take a little paint from your bumper. Traffic laws are rarely enforced and those trying to direct this symphony of insanity have little to no positive effect on regulating the drivers or the traffic flow.
All I can add is that, at least in my part of the Luzon area, when driving I watch the road, the windows, the mirrors and drive defensively and always let those who so desperately need to get in front of me, do so. It saves me, my vehicle and my passengers from damage or injury and the other driver can move on to trying to kill the next person who dares to be in front of them or in the lane they so seem to covet at that time. We even manage to enjoy the ride for the most part without damage to our vehicle or bodily injury and yes we do have insurance and as of this posting we have not had to use it.  Another expat stated that when his vehicle was hit in an accident and the other driver had no insurance. The traffic cop told him, you have insurance so no problem, in other words, you have money so fix it yourself.  :)

I think to drive safely in the Philippines, one must know the rules of the road here. Going through the streets of Metro Manila, both as passenger and driver, and considering that the passing rate for driver's written and driving tests is 100% even though many have not even read the driver's manual, I have come to the assumption that the rules of driving followed here can be summed up as follows:

Red means "Stop"
Green means "Go"
Yellow is subject to interpretation.

Lane markings are a suggestion to stay in your lane, but do try to drive on the right side of the road most of the time.

There's no need to signal for changing lanes (because it will be ignored anyways), except for hazard lights when you need to load / unload someone or something or double park.

Who has right of way? Some drivers have more rights that others depending on what vehicle they're driving. For example, over a driver with a nice newer model car, these have the right of way: drivers of buses, jeepneys, motorcycles, old rusty cars. You get the idea. One can't expect to get compensation for damage on his vehicle by a poor jeepney or bus driver, which is why drivers of luxury cars have to give way all the time, or suffer the consequences.

This is a different country. There's a different mentality. Drivers are more aggressive than defensive. 

I have just made it a point to be aware of these "rules" and attitudes, not fuss so much about things. like who has the right of way when a jeepney cuts me off followed by 10 more tailgating jeepneys, and still be courteous to drivers and pedestrians and drive defensively.

Hi,

i have been driving for 27 years and this is what I can say - i have had foreign guests and they are quick to say that Filipinos are the "best" drivers in the world..lol..why do they say so? Because they said we could weave in and out of tight traffic by inches apart from the car nearby.

While it used to be that a lot of drivers break rules before, because of the presence of CCTVs everywhere, people are a bit more careful now than ever. 

Peak hours? hmmm..I can speak for Metro Manila, 6am-10am then 4pm-8pm on a good day...lol..sorry for my discouraging, disheartening reply.

Transportation in the Philippines can be fun at best.  It is always an adventure to travel.  I did write a blog about this.  Posted it here.  If you wish to read additional blogs there is a link at the bottom.

Living in Cebu or elsewhere in the world, a vehicle can be convenient. But do you really need a car? Some will say yes, others are fine without. Just like home.
Some don’t have it because they cannot afford, while others don’t feel they need it. It all depends on what you’re used to, what family situation you’re in and where you live. Others say they're fine without a car until they get one, then they cannot live without it!
If you’re living in Cebu City, the need of a car is usually less. I stayed here for more than a year just relying on taxis and jeepneys. Taxis are very cheap compared to back home, and they are usually quite easy to find. Exceptions are major holidays like Cristmas Eve, closing time at the malls, during rush hours or when it’s raining heavily. Using a taxi means you don’t have to worry about parking spaces, and if there is a minor accident you’re not responsible. Going out for a few beers, you won’t be tempted of driving drunk. You don’t have to worry about traffic fines, registration and insurance.

A 10 minute taxi trip usually cost around 50 peso.  One hour cost about 200-250 peso. Shopping groceries you usually will need a taxi back home. All the major malls have free “delivery” when you shop a few bags. The boys will bring them to the taxi stand, and help you load the bags in the trunk. I usually tip 10-20 peso for this service even if it’s not required. If you’re living in the province, taxis are limited or non-existent, so you’re relying on the tricycles for this service. It is not as convenient for you as a taxi, but it can work out.

Without a large number of bags, you might also be fine riding a jeepney instead, as long as you don’t have to change too often. A lot of foreigners including myself are not afraid of using them, and they are bang cheap, starting from 7 peso a ride. Some foreigners however, never ride a jeepney.
Are you single, or do you have a large family, needing to drive them to school, sport practice etc? Are you usually just going to the gym, malls, bars and restaurants or do you have a more complex transportation pattern? Do you go away for weekend trips quite often? Do you feel safe driving yourself? If you don't and can afford it, you could hire a private driver for 7000-8000 peso a month.
A jeepney waiting to leave at Carbon Market in...Most expats that don’t have a car have a motorbike instead. Some have both. If you want a motorbike, I recommend minimum of 125cc if you plan to drive a litt longer than just around the province. If it's more for local use, you could also do with less. I bought a Honda XRM for 59.000 peso a few months ago and certainly don’t regret it. I use it every day and would hate losing it. Going to the mall to stock up, I bring a big backpack to stuff the groceries. If you’re comfortable riding a motorbike in the traffic, it’s a great way of getting around whether you live in the city or the province. It’s especially fun when there’s a traffic jam. You can smile and wave goodbye to all the cars you pass.
If you live in the province, I say you need a vehicle unless you are very stationary. Taxis are hard to find, and in many small towns there aren’t any at all. There are usually tricycles or jeepneys around, but if you’re going elsewhere than along the main road it’s not really convenient. Tricycles are not comfortable, and especially not if you’re a big guy. They can be overloaded and slow. Staying in the province, you should at least have a motorbike, but you can do well without a car – I know many foreigners without.
There are some, but not that many guys without a vehicle. Tony Jarman being one of them, and he doesn’t have any problem roaming around town.
Freedom is an important reason for the guys preferring a car. Being able at any time to take off wherever you like, I can understand that argument. Just remember you’re on an island. Bringing your car to another island on the boat can be quite expensive.
Changing weather conditions is a very good reason to have your own car. It does change very quickly here, and riding my motorbike in rain is not too funny – and those are the times I’ve really wanted a car. Then it’s the car drivers turn to laugh as they pass me.

Tim Potter
http://www.timpotter-philippines.com/

I can only add a few comments to the excellent posts appearing above. First, the culture is quite different from that in the States, so Filipinos take very good care of their family members and friends; they don't give a hoot about people they don't know, so they appear horribly inconsiderate. For example, they will make u-turns on two-lane highways, backing up traffic for a hundred meters in both directions. Another issue is fatalism: many believe that they will only die when God calls them, so you see motorcyclists with helmets hanging from their elbows that they only put on when the police are around; these fellows will drive recklessly, fearing nothing.

I will never understand why they back into parking places in parking lots. Backing a car into a parking place with as little as a foot on either side is a slow process that may require multiple attempts; driving out into an wide aisle is very easy, so that is not an issue. In over fifty countries I have visited, they briskly drive headfirst into these parking places and then easily back out into the aisles, which are much wider than their parking places. I was amazed to learn that if you take a driving course in the Philippines, they will teach you to back into these parking places! I can only speculate that the first drivers in the Philippines were chauffeurs, so they would drop off their wealthy passengers and then back into a parking place so that they could quickly pull out and pick up their passengers.

Whether driving or a passenger in another vehicle, bear in mind that their are no trauma units in the Philippines. After a collision, you cannot expect an ambulance to rush you to the nearest ER. In most parts of the Philippines, medical treatment is not up to first-world standards, so you may still die if you reach an ER alive. So, why would you want to ride a motorcycle where, even in America, you are 30 times more likely to be killed in a collision than in a car?

"I will never understand why they back into parking places in parking lots. Backing a car into a parking place with as little as a foot on either side is a slow process that may require multiple attempts; driving out into an wide aisle is very easy, so that is not an issue. In over fifty countries I have visited, they briskly drive headfirst into these parking places and then easily back out into the aisles, which are much wider than their parking places. I was amazed to learn that if you take a driving course in the Philippines, they will teach you to back into these parking places! I can only speculate that the first drivers in the Philippines were chauffeurs, so they would drop off their wealthy passengers and then back into a parking place so that they could quickly pull out and pick up their passengers."

Sir with all due respect to your opinion, I have been driving for 27 years and it is easy to maneuver a car into a parking space with rear first.  This is also especially true for parallel parking.  It also makes it easier to drive off after.   I only park head first when I will go grocery shopping and need easier access to the trunk to put the groceries in.

I do respect your opinion, but I am sure a lot of drivers out there reading this will agree with me.

katefs4 :

Sir with all due respect to your opinion, I have been driving for 27 years and it is easy to maneuver a car into a parking space with rear first.  This is also especially true for parallel parking.  It also makes it easier to drive off after.   I only park head first when I will go grocery shopping and need easier access to the trunk to put the groceries in.

I do respect your opinion, but I am sure a lot of drivers out there reading this will agree with me.

I agree with you that it is easier to maneuver a car in reverse. I drove a fork lift truck one summer and its rear wheels did the steering; I could precisely maneuver the fork lift to pick up a pallet and drop it off exactly where I wanted, often on top of many other loaded pallets. Indeed, I could not parallel park in less than three meters if I did not back in.

On the fork lift, I faced in the opposite direction as in a car: the wheels that steered were behind me, not in front of me. In a car, I have to rely on mirrors and turning my head to see where I'm going when I am in reverse. I am 68 and have difficulty turning my head like the girl in The Exorcist, but turning your head at 27 is probably easier! Also, unless you are driving a convertible, rear vision is going to be limited, unlike when you are looking out through your windshield.

1) I wish i was 27 as far as driving is concerned  :D
2) I wish I had a convertible if only to make it easier too  :D

katefs4 :

Hi,

i have been driving for 27 years and this is what I can say - i have had foreign guests and they are quick to say that Filipinos are the "best" drivers in the world..lol..why do they say so? Because they said we could weave in and out of tight traffic by inches apart from the car nearby.

I am one of those who used to say that, for that same reason.  However, after more than a few weeks, I realised that although they are good at avoiding accidents, there is no courtesy. So I changed my mind :)

"Red means "Stop"
Green means "Go"
Yellow is subject to interpretation."

FilAmericanMom this made me chuckle.  When I was younger and had my 5 yr old daughter riding with me, when I was near the intersection and saw the Yellow light, I stepped on the gas.  My daughter in all her sweet innocence,asked:

"Mom, Green is go?"
"Yes"
"Red is stop?"
"Yes"
"Yellow means drive very fast?"
:o
I was speechless.  Bad example I was. Well that was 2 decades ago, I have mellowed, and now Yellow means slow down to me.  :)

katefs4 :

I will never understand why they back into parking places in parking lots. Backing a car into a parking place with as little as a foot on either side is a slow process that may require multiple attempts
<..>
I do respect your opinion, but I am sure a lot of drivers out there reading this will agree with me.

Reverse Parking or Forward Parking ?

I am a reverse parker, that is how we were taught in the UK, and I find it difficult to forward park, as I never did it till going to Australia.

I can reverse park in one easy go, between two cars with minimal gap, but forward parking in the same space, and its a pain for me.

But in Australia about 9 in 10 will forward park.  At least I could easily find my car in the car park, the only one with the front end visible ;)

Another study:
In China, 88 percent of cars are reverse parked.
In the US less than 6 percent are reverse parked .

I would say China is like UK and US is like Australia in this respect.

Satellite pictures of Car Parks in Different countries would show an interesting picture :)

Philippine car parks seem so empty, that you can park anywhere easily, so just drive straight in, through and straight out .

Yup, same here, I am a reverse parker too. I find it easier in one go.  :top:

Driving ion Metro Manila is a nightmare while driving on some other islands is not so hectic. The drivers here are very undisciplined and don't follow the traffic laws, generally drive too fast in Manila, don't leave enough distance between themselves and the car in front of them and are generally bad drivers. I have enough money to buy a car in Manila but I won't because of this situation. Maybe I would if I went to live in Iloilo City again.

joewmason1 :

The drivers here are very undisciplined and don't follow the traffic laws,.

Philippines Traffic laws:

The driver of a vehicle about to be overtaken and passed by another vehicle approaching from the rear shall give way to the overtaking vehicle

This means that if someone wants to push their car in front of you, you MUST pull back to let him.

Hmm, some drivers do pull back, others feel they shouldn't have to.

Which one is breaking the law ?

katefs4 :

Sir with all due respect to your opinion, I have been driving for 27 years and it is easy to maneuver a car into a parking space with rear first.  This is also especially true for parallel parking.  It also makes it easier to drive off after.   I only park head first when I will go grocery shopping and need easier access to the trunk to put the groceries in.

I also park my car rear first. The disadvantage for me is that it takes longer. But over time and with practice, it has become easier.

The main advantage is it's easier to drive out, especially during emergencies. It's easier for me to see oncoming cars. Sometimes pedestrians don't pay attention and would walk in front of a car backing out. Or they would be chatting or on their phone, just standing there, oblivious that a car needs to get out. I don't like getting out of my car, for security reasons, to tell someone to get out of the way. (Honking does not get their attention when you're rear facing.)  It's easier to get their attention and they are more likely to hear the car horn when you are forward facing.

Personally as long as it was safe I certainly would pull back. The safer the situation here in the Philippines and especially in Manila the better.

ABCDiamond :

Philippine car parks seem so empty, that you can park anywhere easily, so just drive straight in, through and straight out .

Those are the ones you can see in satellite photos.

Indoor parking such as those near malls are often full. The worst, in my experience, when in comes to availability of parking slots, is Trinoma mall.

Outdoor parking at malls can be full depending on the time of day, especially at the free parking area. Maybe the satellite photos you saw were taken before mall opening, which is usually from 9-11am.

katefs4 :

"Red means "Stop"
Green means "Go"
Yellow is subject to interpretation."

FilAmericanMom this made me chuckle.  When I was younger and had my 5 yr old daughter riding with me, when I was near the intersection and saw the Yellow light, I stepped on the gas.  My daughter in all her sweet innocence,asked:

"Mom, Green is go?"
"Yes"
"Red is stop?"
"Yes"
"Yellow means drive very fast?"
:o
I was speechless.  Bad example I was. Well that was 2 decades ago, I have mellowed, and now Yellow means slow down to me.  :)

I remember my then 4-year old son telling me, when I just started driving here:
Remember Mama:
Red means "Stop"
Green means "Go"
Yellow means "Go faster"

He learned that from his dad.  Haha. (Note to self: I need to have my son unlearn that.)

I never drove even one meter in the Philippines. I am glad my brother-in-law became our family driver .. .  :top:

From Negros Oriental Visayas provice - terrible. No Street lights, all uncontrolled intersections, no speed laws, enforcement, half drivers or more dont have licenses, no traffic signs, road markings, lights are out- been in 3 major accidents in 4 years

Unfortunately driver education and enforcement of regulations is lacking in Philippines . I laugh as motor bikes shoot past me with the driver somehow texting on his cell and smoking at the same time. Or the family of five with the 2 small children are all crammed onto a small motor bike with the rooster and baggage,guess who doesn't get to wear a helmet the little children of course .
Indicators are never used and for the life of me can't understand why ,it seems such a simple operation. The police well only stop u if they believe a settlement might be available.
It's interesting that most of the Filipino responses to this topic have jumped onto the reverse parking subject because it's probably the only area they can defend as it isn't a problem . They conveniently ignore all the other criticisms .
The one positive about all the bizarre disregard for commonsense and safety is that filipinos are slow to anger and road rage seems to be virtually non existent . Unlike Australia where if you cut someone off ,fail to use your indicator or drive too slow you will be the subject of extreme abuse. No matter what your age .
I have learnt to be extremely alert to drive slower and have developed more patience here,that can't be a bad thing . Just hope I never knock anybody off their motorbike that would be a nightmare .

I drove here once but never again, the whole bloody country`s drivers are lunatics, who have no regard for anybody, and if they hit you they will do a runner, leaving you to die on the road.
But if you can survive the road idiots, you can always kick back in your house and listen to the barking dogs, loud deafening music, noise, noise, noise, which all have a calming affect if you are Filipino and brain dead, haha.
And always remember.... the foreigner is ALWAYS in the wrong should they be involved an accident, because if he, or she, was not here then the accident would not have happened.
Filipino logic.

Marathon1946 :

Indicators are never used and for the life of me can't understand why ,it seems such a simple operation. The police well only stop u if they believe a settlement might be available.

After you've driven here for quite some time, you will realize that driving here is not a science, but an art form. My husband and I do use our left and right signals, except for certain situations. Say, we're on EDSA, and we need to make a right at Annapolis in Greenhills, which is just past Camp Crame, and there's heavy traffic. It's hard to go change lanes when you turn on your blinkers, because once the drivers behind you see it, then they will never let you move to a right lane, and you will not be able to make a turn at Annapolis. So, you have to stealthily and slowly nudge your way, or "singit" in Tagalog, the moment you see a space in between two cars on the right.

Even if we do turn on our signals, it gets ignored. I've experienced many times motorcycles cutting in front of me on the left side, or doing a "counter flow", while I'm making a left turn with my blinkers on. Or if I make a right towards the office parking lot, some bicycle or motorcycle would cut in front of me by driving on the sidewalk.

Marathon1946 :

The one positive about all the bizarre disregard for commonsense and safety is that filipinos are slow to anger and road rage seems to be virtually non existent .
Unlike Australia where if you cut someone off ,fail to use your indicator or drive too slow you will be the subject of extreme abuse. No matter what your age .

One guy driving a car cut in front of us and almost hit us. He had the gall to get angry and blame us. He yelled at us, "Go to hell", to which my husband replied, "Go to church." Haha.

Marathon1946 :

Just hope I never knock anybody off their motorbike that would be a nightmare .

I pray every time I drive my car that that would not happen to me.

FilAmericanMom :

One guy driving a car cut in front of us and almost hit us. He had the gall to get angry and blame us. He yelled at us, "Go to hell", to which my husband replied, "Go to church." Haha.

That's where the actual law may be confusing:

The driver of a vehicle about to be overtaken and passed by another vehicle approaching from the rear shall give way to the overtaking vehicle

Strict interpretation of the law says the one in front is right.  I am not sure it was meant to mean that though..

They  don't  obey the  safety  rules and   don't know how to give the right  of  way  to the  other  driver.   They would rather  run  you over instead.

:o lol, driving here is like sticking a pencil in your ear. its that fun. Morons pay their money with no skills. Hate all I have seen. And ex pats after being here 5 years or more drive like the rest of the morons on the road. I drive a multicab, car, ninja, scooter and bicycles. And Filipinos are friggn nuts.Make drivers ed mandatory, enforse driving laws. And do something about the god awful public transpo idiots.

I do not like driving in the Philippines, but I will drive, if necessary. Traffic laws generally are never enforced unless you are in Manila or Subic. In Manila, I normally hire a driver, but occasionally I will drive. I am constantly looking in my rear view mirror, elsewhere. I do not allow trikes, bikes, any vehicle to pass me on the right, if at all possible. I wedge myself to the far right so I cannot be passed. Those who want to pass must do so on the left. That way, I only have to look to my left for the idiot motor scooter/bike riders because I will not give an inch to the right. I have become a better driver in the Philippines because there are so many narrow roads and passages. I have always parked my car in reverse parking. It is just a habit with me. However, spaces are more narrow in the Philippines. So if I am driving an SUV, which is a larger vehicle, I have to be more careful of where I am parking.

I actually had a high-ranking officer of PNP tell me a number of years ago that it is an unwritten rule that foreigners are always at fault in the event of accident. He also told me that if I should hit someone, then it is better to run from the scene or hit the individual again to pay for the funeral, instead of the medical bills and other costs that will be associated with injured party's family members. I told him that I could not do that because of my faith and his response was then I better pray a lot, if I were to hit someone because I would have endless amount of trouble.

Overall, I have a trike service and occasionally I take a jeepney because I hate driving in the Philippines. I can get by for myself and family by hiring a driver, when needed.

THE problem is that there is no real test here no one actually TAKES a test they pay under the table and get a licence most can't drive there is no professionalism as long as they can operate the car that's ok here everyone wants to race and get in front of you.you can't even stop for pedestrians as if you do the cars beside you will not stop and run them over something should be done about this.I was asked to teach someone to drive after four weeks and I thought he was ready to take the test,he showed me a professional licence which he had for two years but he could not drive.this place is insane.the RTA And the police should get together and sort it out like when you drive at night every one drives on full beam,And there is the problem of cars and jeepneys and trucks driving without lights.Don't they realize that when an on coming car with high beam is coming towards you it blinds the on coming driver.Just take a lot of care when out there.

colin wright :

when you drive at night every one drive on full beam,.

I disagree.  Some places they don't even bother with any lights.  I was in Taxi from Cebu Airport to Talisay, and he drove on side lights only at near midnight.  Only used headlights when we reached the house area.

I have driven all over Asia for over 15 years and Manila is by far the worst of any of them...

Appalling roads - the worlds worst drivers - no traffic planning - no traffic enforcement - un-roadworthy vehicles - it's HELL on wheels

posters here have left a few things out, besides being some of the worst, self serving people ( im talking about filipinos) , who think nothing of other peoples time which lets them stop right in the middle of the road, 3 or 4 lanes out in traffic, or try to cram 4 or 5 lanes of traffic into 1 or 2 so THEY can get off at the exit THEY need to not at all considering THEY are blocking the way for everyone else who is going straight. Not to mention that the filipinos who design the roads( look at EDSA and C5 as glaring examples), are someone who went to college but didnt learn a thing, and only got the job because they had a batchmate, classmate or relative that got them the position, despite a well below average IQ and a brain smaller than a monkey. and certainly dont leave out the PNP, MMDA or local cops, particularly Makati's finest, who will pull YOU over if they can see a foreigner on-board, driver or not, and make up all kind of ways to scam you. The most common crime they claim YOU commit is "swerving" and although I have asked 100 times to see the written law regarding "Swerving" I have yet to have a cop who it to me.  A few months ago me and my wife were driving EDSA northbound, in the far right hand lane and exited at Megamall. Then to have a PNP cop, with 3 others around him , jump in front of my car as I turned off EDSA. WHen I asked what he wanted, he said I had a violation for swerving. I said, show me swerving in writing. He couldnt. I said next time you jump in front of my car I will swerve my car up your ass. The 3 other cops started laughing so hard I thought they would piss themselves. I drove off. This happens every day, no foreigner should give the filipino cops the time of day, and for sure dont hand them your drivers license. You will have to pay them a bribe to get it back. That the reality.

Wow! Don't start me on this one. To be brief, driving in the Philippines, anywhere, is a mess...a true reflection of the people. They say Filipinos are generally nice: LOOK HOW THEY DRIVE!!! They say Filipinos are generally sincere: LOOK HOW THEY DRIVE!!!  The fact is: Filipinos are generally self-centers and greedy; they don't care about the interest of the community, other people's safety or hearth, and they get mad if you alert their attention to the problem. Their streets, traffic, pollution and chaos, all testify and concur with my statements. Enjoy!

Sam40 :

Wow! Don't start me on this one. To be brief, driving in the Philippines, anywhere, is a mess...a true reflection of the people. They say Filipinos are generally nice: LOOK HOW THEY DRIVE!!! They say Filipinos are generally sincere: LOOK HOW THEY DRIVE!!!  The fact is: Filipinos are generally self-centers and greedy; they don't care about the interest of the community, other people's safety or hearth, and they get mad if you alert their attention to the problem. Their streets, traffic, pollution and chaos, all testify and concur with my statements. Enjoy!

In general, it is hard to argue against your statements.  But I am glad that some are changing through genuine interactions with other nationalities.

ABCDiamond :
FilAmericanMom :

One guy driving a car cut in front of us and almost hit us. He had the gall to get angry and blame us. He yelled at us, "Go to hell", to which my husband replied, "Go to church." Haha.

That's where the actual law may be confusing:

The driver of a vehicle about to be overtaken and passed by another vehicle approaching from the rear shall give way to the overtaking vehicle

Strict interpretation of the law says the one in front is right.  I am not sure it was meant to mean that though..

I forgot to add a few details to the incident.
We were on an almost empty two-way street coming from church. We were going to turn left so we turned on our left turn signal way before the left turn, giving enough time for anyone behind us to understand what we're planning to do. The car behind cut in front of us from the left side while we were making a left turn. He wasn't paying attention to our signal. I guess he saw that we were slowing down, so he sped up and tried to cut in front of us, almost hitting us in the process. He screamed and yelled at us, like we were in the wrong. Unbelievable.

It's interesting that the conditions of driving are counter to the laid-back lifestyle here. It's like people who are normally nice and polite take on a different persona when they're on the driver's seat. There are drivers here who drive like they're always in a hurry, swerving and driving recklessly just to get to their destination 5 minutes earlier. And yet they dilly dally when they get there.

the problem here is IF he did hit you, it would have been your fault. thats how it is in the phonypines. Case in point. a few weeks back Im having cofee with a forigner in Dumaguete, the city of gentle people. he tells me a story that happened to him where he and his girlfriend are driving down the road at night, all legal, obeying every law. out of the dark comes a drunk filipino on a motorcycle with no headlight who hits them, giving the guy a broken wrist, and the girl some minor injuries. the next day after the foreigner gets out of the hospital, where he paid his own bills, has to meet at the police station with the cops and filipino who hit them, after both sides of the story is told, with the filipino admitting he had been drinking and has no drivers license, the cops tell the foreigner to pay 5000p for damages. When the foreigner says, he hot me, he was drunk, he had no headlight or drivers license why am I the one to pay?The cops tell him, your the one who had  the headlight, you should have seen him. They settled for 2500p or the foreigner would have gone to jail. This is filipino BS going on everyday. Do what is being done here, make the world aware. Boycott the phonypines and stop all foreign AID and support.

I want to be first

Its a crazy dodgem game, gigantic bulks of metal and rust push forward
overtaking Jeepney's (local public transport) and tricycles (motor bike a
sidecar another public transport vehicles) its complete havoc each and
everyone drives defensively.


Coaches and large Jeepney's drive at death defying speeds, well at
least much to fast for the narrow and bad surface roads of the
Philippine. With each mode of travel being loaded like a sardine tin,
some drivers play very loud music and everybody is sweating on a very
hot day.


I prefer to drive a motorbike as it is seemingly safer than a car
because I can dodge the on coming traffic. When I am driving into the
city I am completing with hubble-hubble drivers an illegal Public
transport that the police seeming turn a blind eye to. It's a normal
motor bike that they simply crowd on passengers (7 being the record seen
so far).


There is a law that safety helmets should be used by every one
traveling on a motor bike, seemingly only foreigner such as myself
follow this rule. Others carry their helmets to quickly put on before a
police check and most never wear helmet.


This article was inspired by the fact that I have just realized why
Filipino's fail to obey road safety rules such as wearing helmets.


The other day I was watching people getting on hubble-hubble
motorbikes, each and everyone of them religiously cross themselves like
good Catholics do. Then I remember all the people that get on public
transport normal follow the same procedure.


That means that they put their trust in God when risking their life's
and those nuts that don't wear helmets rather trust in god than have a
sweaty head. The strange fact that there are not many accident's here
properly shows that this blind faith may work. Or perhaps the engine cc
being no more than 200 cc on motor bikes and the bad roads slow down
traffic speeds.


However its fun and just like the dodgems at the fair and pretty
scary when driving at night as many forms of transport lack lights and
those that do wish to blind you. I am not going to cross myself only be
cross with them, lol

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