Interesting and cute words but comments use.

Dear Folk

I have found some interesting and few comments words for some languages which people always use the end of their sentence.

Vietnamese = nha- ma.

Japanese   = Ne-

Thai       Na-

Chinese  = Ma-

Those countries people often use this words the end, and Is there any other languages have something comments like this words?

Singapore - lah

in German too,
for example the word "ke" is typical word uses in the City Erfurt where i m living, it s actually not a word, but many people add this word at the end of the sentence when speaking.
"wir treffen uns morgen, ke?" (see u tomorrow! we will see us tomorrow). It mean equally to "ok", or in some cases means "is es ok for you?", "can you confrim it" etc.

In Australia many people say "hey" at the end of a declarative sentence.

In Vietnamese: nè (this one here), lượngl (which is a spoken exclamation mark, like -lah in Malay)
In Sundanese: dong (spoken exclamation mark)
Indonesian: sih? (meaning 'eh?' in English)

Northern Queenslanders in Australia are renowned for ending sentences with, "...., but, ay?".  For example, "Mullet isn't as good as barramundi, but, ay?"

colinoscapee :

In Australia many people say "hey" at the end of a declarative sentence.

Example: hey how are you or How are you hey?

Collwing :
colinoscapee :

In Australia many people say "hey" at the end of a declarative sentence.

Example: hey how are you or How are you hey?

Not in question form.

That's a big truck,hey.
I'm going to Saigon tomorrow,hey.

Used to make a declaration.

Hoa Oanh :

in German too,
for example the word "ke" is typical word uses in the City Erfurt where i m living, it s actually not a word, but many people add this word at the end of the sentence when speaking.
"wir treffen uns morgen, ke?" (see u tomorrow! we will see us tomorrow). It mean equally to "ok", or in some cases means "is es ok for you?", "can you confrim it" etc.

Probably they only say the "k" (pronounced as a single letter from the alphabet) from "ok".  :unsure

ralphnhatrang :

In Vietnamese: nè (this one here), lượngl (which is a spoken exclamation mark, like -lah in Malay)
In Sundanese: dong (spoken exclamation mark)
Indonesian: sih? (meaning 'eh?' in English)

Northern Queenslanders in Australia are renowned for ending sentences with, "...., but, ay?".  For example, "Mullet isn't as good as barramundi, but, ay?"

I think is the correct words is luôn, not lượngl.

Yoda0807 :

Singapore - lah

The lah is origin from Malay ( Malaysia) am I correct??

re #9 - "lượng" is what my wife uses all the time. It's a local word from our area and not standard Vietnamese.

re #10 - Yes, from Malaysian (Bahasa Malayu).

ralphnhatrang :

re #9 - "lượng" is what my wife uses all the time. It's a local word from our area and not standard Vietnamese.

That’s really interesting.

I had very good experience with one of Indian language calling Tamil. My company hired some translation agency in India to translate English to Tamil.  but, we was so confused because later on we hired more then 8 freelance translators for this. But what we get is different 8 translation, because each city speak different accents and also the difference written.

Ha ha ha!
My wife further informs me that "lượng" is not even used in Nha Trang, 9kms down the road. So not only do I have to learn Vietnamese, I have to learn Nha Trang words, and also Thành words from where we live.

What language books do not tell you is that every village in VN has a different accent, as they do in Britain.

I think these trailing words can be a little more complicated.

'ma' in Mandarin is for asking yes/no questions, as well as confirmations. It isn't just an utterance.

English: That is heavy, right?  == confirmation
Canadian: That is heavy, eh?

Or written as a direct question: Is that heavy?

Mandarin has one form for both question and confirmation:
(That is heavy), ma? 

Japanese has two trailing words for confirmation and question.
Sore wa hon desu.   -- That is a book. == statement
Sore wa hon desu ne.  -- That is a book isn't it? == confimation/emphasis
Sore wa hon desu ka?  -- Is that a book?  == question

yeah, it sounds like "ke". because these words r used just in speaking language. there s in many cases no writing form for them 🤗

Andy Passenger :
Hoa Oanh :

in German too,
for example the word "ke" is typical word uses in the City Erfurt where i m living, it s actually not a word, but many people add this word at the end of the sentence when speaking.
"wir treffen uns morgen, ke?" (see u tomorrow! we will see us tomorrow). It mean equally to "ok", or in some cases means "is es ok for you?", "can you confrim it" etc.

Probably they only say the "k" (pronounced as a single letter from the alphabet) from "ok".  :unsure

sounds like "ke". because these words r used just in speaking language. there s in many cases no writing form for them 🤗

gobot :

I think these trailing words can be a little more complicated.

'ma' in Mandarin is for asking yes/no questions, as well as confirmations. It isn't just an utterance.

English: That is heavy, right?  == confirmation
Canadian: That is heavy, eh?

Or written as a direct question: Is that heavy?

Mandarin has one form for both question and confirmation:
(That is heavy), ma? 

Japanese has two trailing words for confirmation and question.
Sore wa hon desu.   -- That is a book. == statement
Sore wa hon desu ne.  -- That is a book isn't it? == confimation/emphasis
Sore wa hon desu ka?  -- Is that a book?  == question

Thus  words people use often when there daily conversation
The example in Japanese Ne or Ka not stander Japanese or People do not write or speak in business conversation unless they close to each.

New topic