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PANICKING HELP NEEDED FOR WIFE AND KIDS ESPECIALY SCHOOLING

HI Everyone,

Hope you are all well.

My Wife and 2 Kids  3 years and 4 year old boys will be moving to Malta in Jan / Feb 2016 and i nee advise help please..

We most likely will live in Pieta, Msdira, Griza   as it will be relatively close to my new work and i would like to walk to work.

In order to relieve the stress  on my wife i would like her to be able  to wlak the kids to school so we would like some recommendations please.

We speak English my eldest boy is 4 and the younger 3  we would like them to go to the same pre school if possible or Kindergarten we are not sure on how this would work,/

Very nervous and excited and i hear Malta people are very friendly so im sure my boys will settle first is this possible to find a place they can go together in these areas? 

Also im worried and have read a lot about English not being spoken in Govt schools  and at what age would they need to attend oen as i dont think ill be able to afford private shcools i really need some advise please as im panicking my bioys wont settle they very young so over time im sure they will learn Maltese and if not ill do lessons for them   but 3 and 4 years need advice on how best to get them looked after when we arrive

Thanks

Have a read of https://ourmaltamove.wordpress.com/ and think very very carefully about your plans of walking.

It's very hot here, walking generally is just not an option for a large part of the year.

in short - kids go to school which is in your catchment area, gov schools use  english and  maltese, kids start at age 3 (kinder 1), they can go together

for better and more elaborate answers invest 15 minutes of your time and you will find more answers to all your questions, I'm sure you'll manage to do so in next 4 months, don't be lazy

Hi - thanks for linking to my blog volcane :)

miles007 I'm Fi who writes the blog above.

I will 100% emphasise how hard I've found it walking here. It's not impossible, but others will agree that it is not straightforward. Pavements are not even, sometimes they disappear, often they have vehicles parked on them, in the mornings they have rubbish piled up, there is dog poo everywhere... Also if you have to navigate narrow streets without pavements then you will have to deal with cars speeding past you with inches to spare - something I particularly hate.

I don't know how people manage with pushchairs, kids etc. Especially in the summer where the heat and humidity is awful for walking any distance. But some people do manage, it will depend on where you end up living.

Also, I don't know Msida that well apart from going through it on the bus but note that it seems really busy.

Sorry I can't help with schools info. Good luck

I dunno about walking being a problem, the writer has knee problems apparently. As for the heat, I live in Brazil (until Jan next year when we move to Malta) and I walk 1-2 kilometers without breaking a sweat most days - I'm not someone who sweats a lot, but I think some Brits are overly sensitive to heat (my mother is a little when she comes to visit). It begs the question why they moved to a hot country in the first place. If you are young and not a massive sweater, I don't see a problem.

Normally the heat is only a problem for a couple a months of the year but you get used to it after a year or two.

Ray

Dorieus :

I dunno about walking being a problem, the writer has knee problems apparently. As for the heat, I live in Brazil (until Jan next year when we move to Malta) and I walk 1-2 kilometers without breaking a sweat most days - I'm not someone who sweats a lot, but I think some Brits are overly sensitive to heat (my mother is a little when she comes to visit). It begs the question why they moved to a hot country in the first place. If you are young and not a massive sweater, I don't see a problem.

I do have a knee problem and the uneven pavements can be difficult with that. But the knee problem doesn't have anything to do with the issues with missing pavements, blocked pavements, dangerous drivers...

As for the heat, it is very different in Malta to places we've been before, probably down to humidity. On paper the temperatures don't seem too bad even in summer, but it is very different in reality. I found it much easier walking in 40-45degrees in Utah than I do in 30-35degrees in Malta.

Also the buildings I've stayed in here seem to retain heat like nothing I've experienced before - evenings inside are so sticky unless you have aircon on.

Thanks everyone  ..

I am doing as much reading between now and when we arrive for sure  .. but it helps to have people that can assist you  .. we wont have family or any friends there we will be alone   .. Im happy to use the Bus also if that's an option  ..Im not lazy just trying to get advice so that its easier to settle isn't that what this forum is about .. I guess ill only be able to judge once we arrive there   as to whats best and how to get the kids settled etc but im more  nervous for them that i am for me and want them to be comfortable is all

Some construction types will be cooler, some stones lose heat very quickly. Might be worth looking into the cooler materials (probably the ones used in older houses) and keep the windows open.

As for missing pavements and traffic - I agree these things are problematic. Unfortunately some countries don't have quite the developed infrastructure that the UK does :(

I hear that Malta is taking a lot of investment, due to government policies - hopefully there will be more money pumped into the councils to fix those problems in the near future.

Dorieus :

Some construction types will be cooler, some stones lose heat very quickly. Might be worth looking into the cooler materials (probably the ones used in older houses) and keep the windows open.

The majority of houses in Malta are built of stone (limestone, I think - from the quarries on the island), even new and expensive ones, as can be seen very well when you walk/drive past newly built/never finished houses in shell form. This material stores the heat in summer (our bedroom wall, which faces south-west) is like a radiator all night, and stores the humidity in winter.
Insulation is almost unheard of, even double glaced windows are not always the norm in new buildings. And the generally rather low standard of build quality (gaps between window frames and wall, etc.) doesn't really help, either.
Keeping the windows open when it's hot an humid (not to mention loud and dusty) outside won't really do the trick, either...

Dorieus :

As for missing pavements and traffic - I agree these things are problematic. Unfortunately some countries don't have quite the developed infrastructure that the UK does :(

I hear that Malta is taking a lot of investment, due to government policies - hopefully there will be more money pumped into the councils to fix those problems in the near future.

Regarding missing pavements - often even a lot of investment won't help, as there is simply no space for pavements. Some streets are so narrow you can barely drive through without scratching your car's mirrors...

Surely you can find houses that aren't made of limestone, if they are the problem?

Regarding the narrow streets, it's always a problem in older cities, and Malta is pretty old. In the newer countries they would just move people back and increase the road, but places with a lot of history I imagine it's near impossible.

Dorieus :

Surely you can find houses that aren't made of limestone, if they are the problem?

Regarding the narrow streets, it's always a problem in older cities, and Malta is pretty old. In the newer countries they would just move people back and increase the road, but places with a lot of history I imagine it's near impossible.

re: houses not made of limestone: as I said, the majority of houses is made of that material; even new ones (there's a building site near where we live - they're building a new block and use limestone and concrete bricks). You can have the AC running all day like our neighbours, of course...

re: narrow streets: the history may be one problem, sheer lack of space (Malta is densely populated) is another problem.

Please, everyone, don't misunderstand me: I'm not trying to make Malta sound bad, I actually like it a lot here. But there are issues, and of that I am aware and anyone considering a move here should be aware. Some things (such as hot houses in summer, cold houses in winter) are the norm here, and unless you're lucky (or wealthy enough) to find a "better" home, you'll have to accept things the way they are...

You do get nicer places of course but there are generally no brick houses here - very few. Ballut Blocks + Sandstone combos that's it

We are moving into a house of character with underfloor heating throughout and double glazing and aircons in every room. No idea how much I am looking forward to that because winter in these houses is brutal.

Dorieus :

Surely you can find houses that aren't made of limestone, if they are the problem?

Regarding the narrow streets, it's always a problem in older cities, and Malta is pretty old. In the newer countries they would just move people back and increase the road, but places with a lot of history I imagine it's near impossible.

Have you been to Malta?

Dorieus :

Surely you can find houses that aren't made of limestone, if they are the problem?

Regarding the narrow streets, it's always a problem in older cities, and Malta is pretty old. In the newer countries they would just move people back and increase the road, but places with a lot of history I imagine it's near impossible.

Presumably you have never been to Malta, virtually all houses are built of locally quarried stone and concrete blocks.

Ray

Gotcha, I'm just trying to understand the difference between winter and summer in Brazil and Malta - will help preparation. To be honest I like the look of those stone houses, wondering if they are less practical than what I have here, lol.

What do the native Maltese think concerning that? Do they cope or what?

(BTW I think this thread has been a bit hi-jacked)

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