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Migrating to Malaysia outside of the MM2H program

As the title states. I am looking to emigrate to Malaysia, but I am uncertain on how to proceed since I don't meet the liquid asset qualifications for MM2H program. From what I have read you must reside in Malaysia for 5 years to qualify for permanent residency. How should I proceed? What Visa will I need. I know that a US passport allows for a 90 day stay, but I'm looking for residency. Thoughts?


Thanks

Hello

Can u email me at xxx
Maybe i can help you

Julie

Moderated by Bhavna 7 months ago
Reason : Please exchange contact details via private messaging.
We invite you to read the forum code of conduct

Hello
I am MM2H Holder and professional Businessman
mail me i will guide you
Thank you

xxx

Moderated by Bhavna 7 months ago
Reason : Please exchange contact details via private messaging.
We invite you to read the forum code of conduct

I am not sure why you have chosen Malaysia, do you have roots here? I'd be interested to know the reasons why you feel that Malaysia is a great country. Reading your profile, you seem fed up with American politics, but then do you think the politics in Malaysia will be better?

Is there something negative about emigrating to Malaysia? I've looked at Australia, but the process to emigrate is cumbersome among many other things such as high taxes and high rents. The cost of buying leisure items is also expensive, so Australia is a no go for me. I'm looking at Malaysia because of its proximity to other SE Asian countries. I don't have any roots there, but from what I've researched; Malyasia is a melting pot of various cultures such as Chinese, Indian, Middle Eastern, and a few smaller groupings of ethnicity.  The US dollar is also another attraction about going to Malaysia. The Dollar goes far there. I've also looked into Europe, but that continent is experiencing a calamity because of the masses of refugees from Syria and Iraq. The crime in Sweden has skyrocketed because of the refugee crisis. Many are being deported back, but it's very expensive for these small countries. The primary issue that I see in the coming years for Europe is that the Euro currency is the root of most of the problems, but the refugees are utilizing the welfare programs in many of the EU countries, which will further devastate the economies of those countries.

Furthermore, Malaysia speaks English for the most part, but I am not opposed to learning another language to integrate into society. Chinese, Korean, Vietnamese, Indian, Thai, and Middle Eastern foods are what I mostly eat in the US since the US capital is full of ethnic restaurants. I'm just looking at options to get out of the US because of the political rhetoric and the fact that the job and housing market hasn't improved since the 2008 financial calamity.

@Marukai47

If you are looking at Malaysia to live and work I suggest that you first read the many informative posts on this forum regarding Malaysia.

I would also suggest that you look at Thailand too.

Both countries have the pros and cons.

Try this site to compare living costs.  www.numbeo.com

A work visa is valid for ten years(there is a shorter and cheaper version)...it costs about eight thousand malaysian ringit the last time i checked for the ten year one upfront and there might be a once a year cost associated also...it is a good place to start...

Frankly speaking, I would suggest spending some time traveling around SE Asia to get a better feel about each country. No country out here is perfect. I moved to Malaysia 12 years ago because they spoke English, allowed me to buy property under my own name, and was fairly westernized. I guess not so different to your own reasons.

Malaysia is good for food and shopping. It's easy to get around and most everyone speaks English. Those are the good points. What I began to feel is that it is becoming expensive, schooling for kids is ridiculously high, cost of living is not all that cheap, taxi drivers can be a problem, and of course you shouldn't talk about politics which currently has big issues. I also found that Malaysia is less interesting or adventurous than many of it's neighbours. The countryside is mile upon mile of palm oil plantations. Of course many expats in Malaysia will disagree with my opinion.

As Stumpy says, Thailand is a nice option, a very interesting country to live in. Similarly, Indonesia is interesting and a lot more affordable, I moved to Indonesia last year and no regrets. But perhaps getting into Indonesia is more strict unless you want to be an English teacher and have a TEFL Cert, which might be a good starting point.

Other countries to consider are Vietnam. If your budget allows, Japan is an amazing place, although not many people speak English.

Anyway, Malaysia is not a bad place to live, but perhaps twelve years in one place was enough for me and I needed a change. But it is worth looking at other countries too and you should come out here and visit some places before deciding on one country.

Could you point me in the direction of where these Visa's can be found online?


Thanks

Thailand is of interest to me, but it seems their Visa process if a bit more complex.

Many Embassies have websites and give details of Visa requirements.

Hi dont listen to nonsense like 10 year visa for someone new. A lot of com men operate who sell fake visas.

If you cant afford MM2H then you can try to work in Malaysia to get a 1 or 2 year work permit (sometimes 3 years but rare first time). To do this you need to be an expert in field that is in demand etc and isnt that easy.

But to be honest if you cant afford MM2H go to Thailand, Vietnam or Phillipines as you are too poor for Malaysia (the capital requirements are very low for MM2H). And plenty of valid reasons already given in other posts like why Malaysia etc.

Thank-you for your advise...yes the ten year visa might keep me from exploring and other opportunities and as you said the shorter one is still very expensive probably compared to the other countries you listed but the last i gathered it would be difficult in the phillipines to work legally although it is very easy to work illegally...but i will certainly consider the great variety of choices instead of getting bogged down and stagnant in one place and wishing i had tried some place else

I agree with Hansson and also wanted to know why you WANT to come here. In a way it makes no sense.

Im from US and in Malaysia almost 17 years and the only thing I want to do is GO. I first got the urge to leave after about 4 years but didnt heed the clear messages. Too long to explain all the whys.

If a person is compelled to come because of a job transfer, ok great. Come and enjoy. But I can PROMISE that running away from US on the belief Malaysia is better only shows a person cant possibly know what they are doing.

Like Hansson said, come for six months or a year and spend time in all the SE Asia countries and consider decisions only afterwards. Or make several shorter trips. Take time. To pack up and come here with no experience and in THIS environment is FOLLY and is unlikely to end well.

And forget residency as a goal. How can you even say that without being here a while first? Maybe after a stint you wouldnt even want it. Residency may or may not ever happen so dont even try to make it a requirement. Yes, you get 90 days and you can repeat that at least a few times until you are cut off.

How Malaysia works best for a person is to come with a confirmed plan, money, job, etc. thats already been worked out before you arrive. Then on different levels you have a chance.

I read your profile and posts and DO get you but some of us are lightyears ahead of you and its hard to impart the knowledge that you must have to save yourself wasted time and money. But here is just one of a million questions to think about: You mentioned that there are Indians, Malay and Chinese here. Well tell me, how does that fact benefit you? What good do you think is going to happen to you as a result of knowing there are several races and cultures here? Do you think they will stop their own complex disharmonious wars to help you accomplish something, especially because you are half-Asian? You really think that? Or how about this: You suppose the economy is better here. Ok in what ways would a better economy directly help you? Help how? Do you think it would help you moreso than a local? See, you have to figure out how whatever this place is, it is truly a step up from what you have now and that benefits can be identified and put to use by you. You may be able to figure out some now, others maybe not for 10 years. Do you have 10 years to try?

My posts often have a negative tone because I care about newcomers and hate to see them wreck up their lives by believing a rosy picture that may be far from the truth. Before I came the first time, everyone was so positive and not so truthful. That cost me years of pain.

if you want to talk sometimes on Skype, PM me for my address. I'll do my best to fill you in.

Cvco I know the feeling that others feel that pointing out Malaysia isnt so wonderful / cheap etc makes you "negative" vs all that "streets paved with gold and easy jobs" optimism of newbies.

If i had the chance would go to USA as cheaper to live in than Malaysia (outside of New York and a few other places). Most Malaysians would follow me if they had the chance!

Guess I'm one of the rare breed that actually prefers and enjoys living in Malaysia, since I find more upsides than downsides (I relocated here after marrying a Malaysian). I've had to accept certain trade offs living here and am so far OK with it. Ask me again if things go much wonkier with the politics and racial and religious extremism here and I might have to pull out Plan B.

As CVCO and Nemo point out, you need to have a plan and do your due diligence  before making the move here, otherwise you can end up quite disillusioned and frustrated with what you find.

I don't think that Malaysia is a bad place to live at all. In fact it is easier to live here than most other countries in Asia. But it is becoming more and more expensive and it is less exciting than places like Indonesia, Vietnam and Thailand. Malaysia seems "too organized", so after 12 years I just felt I was missing out on experiencing more exciting places to live.

But Malaysia is wonderful for shopping and eating out, that's for sure. I still need to come back here quite often to take care of various matters, and to see friends, so I don't get to miss it.

You totally nailed it.
Been here 8 years, Visa issues, liars, religious intolerance and racism (but not against you), you can expect them all.
It's a nice place to live but getting more and more expensive (ridiculously so).
The chances of getting PR are very, very distant and unlikely.
I love Thailand but lots of Visa issues. Vietnam interests me. But for now my wife is happy here and I'm happy to keep her happy!

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