Vietnam passport cost - How much did you pay?

Approved for Vietnam passport from Vietnam Embassy in DC recently. Some observations -

1) The process was simple. I have original Vietnam birth certificate.
2) The official at DC Embassy was courteous and professional. Responded to email and text.
3) Process took about 6 weeks.

Now the money

1) There is no official cost posted on the Website
2) The embassy official called me and asked for ~$900 to do standard process or $1100 for expedited. I opted for the standard fee.

The question -

From looking around here, it seems there is no OFFICAIL set price. Price seems to vary between 400-2000. Bear in mind , the process I used is the official channel. No middleman.

Why the price difference? How much did you actually pay?

PS - I would have no issue paying the ~$900 fee  if it is the official cost.

BTW - keeps politics out of this discussion please.

When you say you have original Vietnamese birth certificate and you're approved for Vietnamese passport, do you mean you still have Vietnamese nationality? 

If the answer is yes, then why must you pay $900 when all Vietnamese citizens pay only VND 200k for their passports? 

If the answer is no, then perhaps the $900 includes the fee to regain Vietnamese nationality which you might have lost when you became US citizen.

"If the answer is no, then perhaps the $900 includes the fee to regain Vietnamese nationality which you might have lost when you became US citizen."

This was my case. However, there are other Viet Kieu who reported paying $400 to regain citizenship in SF or Houston.

FYI - I'm wondering why the reported prices paid are non-uniform and vastly different. There is absolutely no intention of accusation or anything.

VinceVN :

This was my case. However, there are other Viet Kieu who reported paying $400 to regain citizenship in SF or Houston.

According to Department of Justice in Saigon, the fee to regain citizenship is 2.5M if you're applying in-country.  Adding 200k for the passport, your total cost should only be 2.7M or $116.

Tomorrow, I'll check on the fee for Overseas Vietnamese who apply from outside of Vietnam.  It's very late now and my brain has turned into mush.

Even in Australia a passport is only 230 aud, 900 usd is ridiculous.

As per your bio page you presently live in San Diego, it is unfortunate that you did not deal with the consulate in San Francisco.  I know it's 500 miles away but it's still a lot closer than D.C.  Their website does not specify the fee either but I have found they are very responsive to phone calls and would definitely give you an amount if you called.  In fact they would almost have to, as their instructions call for sending a "MONEY ORDER or CASHIER'S CHECK" (their capslock) together with your documents.  Based on the document list, they are clearly set up to take applications from US citizens .  If you are not too committed, you might consider calling them first and maybe resubmitting.

San Francisco Passport

THIGV :

As per your bio page you presently live in San Diego, it is unfortunate that you did not deal with the consulate in San Francisco.  I know it's 500 miles away but it's still a lot closer than D.C.  Their website does not specify the fee either but I have found they are very responsive to phone calls and would definitely give you an amount if you called.  In fact they would almost have to, as their instructions call for sending a "MONEY ORDER or CASHIER'S CHECK" (their capslock) together with your documents.  Based on the document list, they are clearly set up to take applications from US citizens .  If you are not too committed, you might consider calling them first and maybe resubmitting.

San Francisco Passport

FYI -  In my mind,  it would be better to deal directly with the Embassy because it is the face of a nation.

BTW - Vietnam Embassy in DC does not mention anything about cashier check or money order. I paid using credit card over the phone. The charge clearly stated Embassy of Vietnam.

I never thought there is a vast difference in price until I read this forum because I was doing business with a very front face of a nation.

The embassy may be as you say "the face of a nation" but sadly the nation does not put its best face forward.  Paying by credit card over the phone is certainly more convenient but I still stick with the superiority of SF Consulate.  When I renewed my VEC I had to call them for the price but I found them to be polite and responsive on the phone.  The VEC price was $70 vs. $10 in Vietnam so I expect their passport charge is more than within Vietnam but maybe better than D.C.

When I first had to certify all my documents for marriage and work permit I thought the same as you and sent them all through D.C.  I found dealing with them to be very frustrating and later had to recertify some of my documents in HCMC because the Embassy had certified them but not translated.  Perhaps the Embassy is better if you speak Vietnamese, but the people who answer the phone in SF speak excellent English.

BTW why are you a Patriots fan instead of a Chargers fan?   :/

To THIGV's point in my dealings with VN government in US for visas and authentication of marriage docs I aways had much better service from SF than Washington.

THIGV :

BTW why are you a Patriots fan instead of a Chargers fan?   :/

Nah - the Chargers left me!!!

I speak excellent VNese. Maybe because of that, I paid more? Should have waited when I'm in VN to start the process. Well, one lives and learns.

I just don't understand how a nation does not put its best face outside? The DC embassy does not even have .vn official domain email. All documents were sent through gmail account. Hey, if they want, I am willing to contribute to maintain an official domain registration for Vietnam until I die.

Vietnam has abundance of talents, but they do business much much different than we are used to in USA.

BTW - I did not know one can do VEC inside Vietnam. I had it too and it was $70 in Houston as well.

VinceVN :

BTW - I did not know one can do VEC inside Vietnam. I had it too and it was $70 in Houston as well.

You can but of course you have to enter the country on another visa which would be substantially more than the $60 price difference.  I think even a 90 day single entry visa is $80 these days.  That is however, the most likely scenario for foreigners who marry after entering Vietnam.

Just curious; has the Embassy told you that holding a VN passport now entitles you to entry, albeit with a 14 day quarantine?  Would that be considered repatriation even if you originally left as a child?  I sense from reading here that there is resentment building among expats who are unable to reunite with their spouses and children, while multi-national corporations can bring in their managers and other "experts."  Of course only a very few of those expats would be eligible for a VN passport.

[at]THIGV - I am not a lawyer so take the answers with a grain of salt.

Just curious; has the Embassy told you that holding a VN passport now entitles you to entry, albeit with a 14 day quarantine? 
==> a passport holder is a citizen of a country and is free to enter/exit the country without a VISA. One can even vote in an election too. I think the law is internationally adopted.

Would that be considered repatriation even if you originally left as a child?
==> I am not sure I understand the question. When a person returns to birth place (original root) , by definition, it is repatriation! The only question - is the repatriation permanent or temporary?

I sense from reading here that there is resentment building among expats who are unable to reunite with their spouses and children, while multi-national corporations can bring in their managers and other "experts."
==> Are you referring to bringing the family into VN? I have not heard of VN restriction to have family reunite into VN. Why would they? it is a huge economic advantage by having family together with expats IF they can show sufficient financial. Of course, all must be subjected to VN immigration laws.  Individuals can never compete with multi-national corporations (just like any other countries in the world). Like it or not, it's a reality. Economic first, right?

AFAIK, countries that I have travelled to would give higher preference to people that are likely to contribute to the economy than people who are likely a burden. In fact, Malaysia/Thailand/Singapore/Indonesia would not grant long term VISA if one can't prove self-sufficient. Why would they want to carry the burden of someone else? Let the USA have those!!!

I sense from reading here that there is resentment building among expats who are unable to reunite with their spouses and children, while multi-national corporations can bring in their managers and other "experts."
==> Are you referring to bringing the family into VN? I have not heard of VN restriction to have family reunite into VN. Why would they? it is a huge economic advantage by having family together with expats IF they can show sufficient financial. Of course, all must be subjected to VN immigration laws.  Individuals can never compete with multi-national corporations (just like any other countries in the world). Like it or not, it's a reality. Economic first, right?

The government has stopped foreign spouses from returning to Vietnam to be with their family. It has been all over the news about foreign spouses stuck in other countries unable to enter Vietnam. Nothing to do with money, all to do with citizenship.

I was referring to the more recent COVID restrictions not the general ones.  And yes foreign holders of VEC who have citizen spouses still in Vietnam have been denied entry until now.  At least that is what I read here.  For a while, the only people being allowed entry were citizens such as students and overseas workers, on special repatriation flights organized by officials.  Things may be different now.

THIGV :

I was referring to the more recent COVID restrictions not the general ones.  And yes foreign holders of VEC who have citizen spouses still in Vietnam have been denied entry until now.  At least that is what I read here.  For a while, the only people being allowed entry were citizens such as students and overseas workers, on special repatriation flights organized by officials.  Things may be different now.

No, it hasnt changed. There are expats stuck just over the border in Cambodia unable to enter to be with their families.

If you guys are referring to COVID-19 situation, I stand corrected. I am not even close to know what rules VN has put in place as of now!!!

I would think if I can get a seat on government charter flights (as a VNese passport holder), I would be allowed to enter VN just like any other VNese, of course, all COVID-19 rules must be obeyed.

VinceVN :

If you guys are referring to COVID-19 situation, I stand corrected. I am not even close to know what rules VN has put in place as of now!!!

I would think if I can get a seat on government charter flights (as a VNese passport holder), I would be allowed to enter VN just like any other VNese, of course, all COVID-19 rules must be obeyed.

[at]vinceVN I'm curious to know why you decided to get your Vietnamese passport? Thank you.

\[at]CoderX10
"I'm curious to know why you decided to get your Vietnamese passport? Thank you."

==> Your question is simple but I will respectfully refrain from answering your question.

As I travel, I saw foreigners from certain ethnics treat VNese in VN with extreme disrespect (of course, it's not a majority, but a good numbers) . As an American, I was a bystander with little I can intervene. I spoke to some of the disrespected, they put up with it because of economic survival for their family. I completely understand but  it broke my heart. As a VNese, if I happen to witness again, I can do far more and I would have none-of-the-disrespect!!! You ask to come to my house, I want you to enjoy but you must absolutely respect my rules. I am not bounded by economic survival.

It is interesting though once they heard English (fairly certain they don't understand me, but they know it's not VNese), they figure I am American, they change their behavior 180 right away!!! Perhaps they know Americans don't need their money and thus wouldn't put up with cr*ps.

BTW - I saw many same cases in Thailand also. I told the tuk-tuk guys to beat the jesus out them to teach a lesson, they said the same thing, family economic survival!!!

None in Singapore/Japan/Korea - go figure.

VinceVN :

\[at]CoderX10
"I'm curious to know why you decided to get your Vietnamese passport? Thank you."

==> Your question is simple but I will respectfully refrain from answering your question.

As I travel, I saw foreigners from certain ethnics treat VNese in VN with extreme disrespect (of course, it's not a majority, but a good numbers) . As an American, I was a bystander with little I can intervene. I spoke to some of the disrespected, they put up with it because of economic survival for their family. I completely understand but  it broke my heart. As a VNese, if I happen to witness again, I can do far more and I would have none-of-the-disrespect!!! You ask to come to my house, I want you to enjoy but you must absolutely respect my rules. I am not bounded by economic survival.

It is interesting though once they heard English (fairly certain they don't understand me, but they know it's not VNese), they figure I am American, they change their behavior 180 right away!!! Perhaps they know Americans don't need their money and thus wouldn't put up with cr*ps.

BTW - I saw many same cases in Thailand also. I told the tuk-tuk guys to beat the jesus out them to teach a lesson, they said the same thing, family economic survival!!!

None in Singapore/Japan/Korea - go figure.

I respect that. I only ask because if you are an American citizen coming to Vietnam using a Vietnamese passport, the US embassy/consulate here can refuse emergency services since you are considered as a Vietnamese citizen and they would expect the Vietnamese government to assist you in that emergency situation. Correct me if I am wrong but I believe that is one of the risk you run and you will inherit  the rights and responsibilities of a Vietnamese citizen by entering with a Vietnamese passport. That is what the guy at the consulate told me of the risk of dual citizenship.


BTW - I did not know one can do VEC inside Vietnam. I had it too and it was $70 in Houston as well.


Just wondering as to why you would need a VEC?

colinoscapee :

Just wondering as to why you would need a VEC?

No need. Just surprise that one can do inside VN.

CoderX10 :

I respect that. I only ask because if you are an American citizen coming to Vietnam using a Vietnamese passport, the US embassy/consulate here can refuse emergency services since you are considered as a Vietnamese citizen and they would expect the Vietnamese government to assist you in that emergency situation. Correct me if I am wrong but I believe that is one of the risk you run and you will inherit  the rights and responsibilities of a Vietnamese citizen by entering with a Vietnamese passport. That is what the guy at the consulate told me of the risk of dual citizenship.

I am not well versed in this subject. I had never travelled with dual passports. There are more experience expats here who can fill in.

AFAIK, if one shows up at the embassy and can produce a passport, the Embassy is "supposed" to help. As for American Embassy's help, there are many reports that it is close to zilt unless one is a high profile and can pull strings or a major event like COVID-19 shutout.

So the benefits outweighs the risk of lack of "help".

VinceVN :
colinoscapee :

Just wondering as to why you would need a VEC?

No need. Just surprise that one can do inside VN.

I see. You said you had one too in Houston.

Your story is confusing.

colinoscapee :
VinceVN :
colinoscapee :

Just wondering as to why you would need a VEC?

No need. Just surprise that one can do inside VN.

I see. You said you had one too in Houston.

Your story is confusing.

I have one issued from Houston (still valid for another 2 years) before I dig into passport eligibility situation. But now I got the VN passport, I don't need it anymore. but still valid.

Clear as mud now? I wish VN Embassy  invalidates any valid VEC for anyone who was issued the VN passport.

There is no real need to invalidate the VEC.   If you wish to, you can use it and still be subject to its limitations of stay.  Under normal (non-COVID) circumstances, you would still have to make border runs every six months.  After five years, when it runs out it runs out. 

What nobody has brought up is the advantage of holding a VN passport that has nothing to do with entries and stays.  It is the ability to own land without the restrictions applied to other foreigners.  As you are reticent to describe your reasons for obtaining a VN passport, it might not be unreasonable to consider this as a motive.  I am not accusing you of anything inappropriate.  It just makes sense.  :cheers:

THIGV :

There is no real need to invalidate the VEC.   If you wish to, you can use it and still be subject to its limitations of stay.  Under normal (non-COVID) circumstances, you would still have to make border runs every six months.  After five years, when it runs out it runs out. 

What nobody has brought up is the advantage of holding a VN passport that has nothing to do with entries and stays.  It is the ability to own land without the restrictions applied to other foreigners.  As you are reticent to describe your reasons for obtaining a VN passport, it might not be unreasonable to consider this as a motive.  I am not accusing you of anything inappropriate.  It just makes sense.  :cheers:

Nah - you are a bit overthinking man... :-)

VinceVN :

Nah - you are a bit overthinking man... :-)

I can accept that it is not your motivation.  It is however the motivation of many overseas Vietnamese who seek out and obtain Vietnamese passports.

As far as I understand one needs to have or be in an existing family book in order to buy land in VN.  Passport will not do.

A passport designates you as a citizen.  There are a few international exceptions such as refugee passports but that is the general rule.

The idea that you have to be in an existing family book sounds like a typical VN Catch-22.  You need to be in a book so that you can buy land and have your own book. :rolleyes:      Can you be in a family book if you are not a citizen?  If not, a passport is a first step.

A VN passport is a travel document, that's all it is. After getting the Vietnamese passport,  people have to go through a separate process to get a national identification card (chung minh nhan dan) and family book (ho khau gia dinh), which requires residence in Vietnam and contact with the Vietnamese police and border patrol. All the PP does is get you into VN to start the process and that's all it can be used for inside VN.

Rick

THIGV :

The idea that you have to be in an existing family book sounds like a typical VN Catch-22.  You need to be in a book so that you can buy land and have your own book. :rolleyes:

1- Vietnamese citizens do not need to have a family book to buy land.  They can buy anything except agricultural land, residential and agricultural land in protected forest or ecological restoration sub-zone, land reserved for ethnic minorities, etc.

(Citation:  Article 169;  Clause 3 and Clause 4, Article 191; and Article 192 of 2013 Land Law)

In fact, owning property upon which a residence is to be built is the surest way to establish one's own family book. 

2- Even Overseas Vietnamese who have dual nationality but without Vietnamese passport (meaning without household book) are allowed to buy property (land, house, or both) as long as they have proper documents proving their Vietnamese nationality.

(Citation: 
Clause 3, Article 3 of the 2008 Law on Vietnamese Nationality; 
Clause 2, Article 7 and Clause 1, Clause 2, Article 8 of the 2014 Law on Housing;
Clause 2, Article 5 of Decree No. 99/2015 / ND-CP dated October 20, 2015)

Ciambella :
THIGV :

The idea that you have to be in an existing family book sounds like a typical VN Catch-22.  You need to be in a book so that you can buy land and have your own book. :rolleyes:

1 -  Vietnamese citizens do not need to be in a family book to buy land.  They can buy anything except agricultural land, residential and agricultural land in protected forest or ecological restoration sub-zone, land reserved for ethnic minorities, etc.

(Citation:  Article 169;  Clause 3 and Clause 4, Article 191; and Article 192 of 2013 Land Law)

In fact, owning property upon which a residence is to be built is the surest way to establish one's own family book. 

2- Even Overseas Vietnamese who have dual nationality but without Vietnamese passport (meaning without household book) are allowed to buy property (land, house, or both) as long as they have proper documents proving their Vietnamese nationality.

(Citation: 
Clause 3, Article 3 of the 2008 Law on Vietnamese Nationality; 
Clause 2, Article 7 and Clause 1; Clause 2, Article 8 of the 2014 Law on Housing;
Clause 2, Article 5 of Decree No. 99/2015 / ND-CP dated October 20, 2015)

Ms C. I'm glad you rewrote 1-, you had me scratching my head on the first way you put it.

Rick

Budman1 :

Ms C. I'm glad you rewrote 1-, you had me scratching my head on the first way you put it.

Rick

It's my lamentable quirk.  I often write the way I think, post it, then after reading, realise that I need to rewrite to clarify what I wrote.  It always puzzles me that everything makes perfect sense in my mind but looks different on paper.   :/

THIGV :

A passport designates you as a citizen.  There are a few international exceptions such as refugee passports but that is the general rule.

The idea that you have to be in an existing family book sounds like a typical VN Catch-22.  You need to be in a book so that you can buy land and have your own book. :rolleyes:      Can you be in a family book if you are not a citizen?  If not, a passport is a first step.

Can be in a family book if you are married to or directly related to a local...

Budman1 :

A VN passport is a travel document, that's all it is. After getting the Vietnamese passport,  people have to go through a separate process to get a national identification card (chung minh nhan dan) and family book (ho khau gia dinh), which requires residence in Vietnam and contact with the Vietnamese police and border patrol. All the PP does is get you into VN to start the process and that's all it can be used for inside VN.

Rick

When a person is born here in Vietnam, don't they get their personal ID first before getting their passport?

I'm wondering if that's why some people are confused?

The person coming here with a new passport is kind of going backwards?

Only asking...

OceanBeach92107 :

When a person is born here in Vietnam, don't they get their personal ID first before getting their passport?

No.  Since 1999, a person can only apply for CMND (identity card) on or after his 14th birthday.   Before that birthday, his existence is proven with birth certificate, school IDs, and household book.

Most Vietnamese don't have passports.

Jlgarbutt :

Can be in a family book if you are married to or directly related to a local...

Is that a statement or a question?

THIGV :
Jlgarbutt :

Can be in a family book if you are married to or directly related to a local...

Is that a statement or a question?

I'm sure it's a statement, and a correct one.

Ciambella :
OceanBeach92107 :

When a person is born here in Vietnam, don't they get their personal ID first before getting their passport?

No.  Since 1999, a person can only apply for CMND (identity card) on or after his 14th birthday.   Before that birthday, his existence is proven with birth certificate, school IDs, and household book.

Most Vietnamese don't have passports.

I think you're proving my point.

Whatever the name of the documents required , it seems that a person coming to Vietnam with a new passport who then applies to get an ID card is going through a bit of a backwards process, no?

As you say, most Vietnamese don't even have a passport.

So it also reinforces Rick's position that the passport is a travel Document and little else.

Ciambella :

2- Even Overseas Vietnamese who have dual nationality but without Vietnamese passport (meaning without household book) are allowed to buy property (land, house, or both) as long as they have proper documents proving their Vietnamese nationality.[emphasis mine]

Although the first clause is a little confusing, doesn't this kind of settle what people are still going back and forth on?  A passport proves Vietnamese nationality and hence allows the purchase of land.

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