Question about marriage in Vietnam and divorce oversea.

It's a very simple question but I can't seem to find a clear answer online. When a marriage happens Vietnam and then the divorce happens let's say in Canada, is the divorce paper from Canada (translated I guess etc) enough to make the divorce legal in Vietnam, or do you absolutely need to apply for divorce also in Vietnam. In most developed countries, a foreign divorce certificate is a valid paper but I'm not sure about Vietnam. I hope my question makes sense, it's simple in my mind but I find it hard to articulate.

Were you answering Alpha Romeo 416 in the other thread or is this just a coincidence?

Consider that if you wished to marry a Vietnamese citizen and were divorced from a Canadian citizen with no connections to Vietnam, you would need to have your Canadian divorce certificate translated and certified by the VN Embassy in Ottawa.  Why should a Canadian divorce from a VN national be any different?  Of course that would be logical which means that it is not necessarily true in Vietnam.   :huh:

No idea about the Alpha Romeo 416 thread? Is that a car brand?  :)

Yeah it's logical but sometimes, some countries have very nationalistic rules where normal rules don't apply. I would like to know if my divorce in Canada will count as a valid divorce in Vietnam if I ever remarry in Vietnam.

If you get to that point, why not just certify your divorce certificate in Ottawa and never mention your ex-wife's citizenship.  The information on a divorce certificate obviously varies from place to place.  Although her name may be Vietnamese, is her national origin and the place of marriage on the certificate?  If not, she could just as well be a Canadian citizen, born in Canada after 1975.   You may be anticipating a problem where there is none.

I just don't like leaving things to luck, not in such important scenarios. It's hard to believe I'm the only one on this forum who got married in Vietnam, got divorced oversea, and potentially remarry in Vietnam? Well, now that I think of it, I might be the craziest man to ever walk this Earth  :D

You should talk to the Vietnamese consulate or embassy if you are out of Vietnam. I'm sure they can advise you.

I am thinking of marrying here in VN and was wondering what your experience was.  I've been working here in VN 6 months and have known gf for a year.  I've been sort of documenting spending time with her such as airline receipts on trips we have taken as that was recommended.  My question is how difficult was it for you to get married in VN? I am from the US and have a certificate of non marriage,  in English. Another post in this forum listed other documents I would need.  Just want  to know how that went.   Next,  once married, what's your take on getting your new wife back to Canada.  I think for US citizen it takes over a year to get that visa.

We were in Saigon and we paid a lady to guide us through everything. She had contacts all over and we just followed instructions. Went to the doctor for the "mental" test, had papers translated, and presented everything to the office of marriage. We had to give some lucky money there and there but eventually all went well.

Immigration to Canada is totally different than the US. It's easier to get your wife to the U.S. but she won't be resident for a long while. In Canada, it's a bit more complicated but she becomes 100% resident the day she enters the country.

Thanks for the quick response and info. Sorry to hear your 1st one did not work. I am considering doing a pre-nup agreement. Have you gone that way?

If you can, do it. A pre-nup could defiitely "save your life". I did not do it as I live in the only province in Canada where a pre-nup is void, it's superseded by family law which you can't escape.

Yes, i found out Vietnamese marriage laws have good pre-nup system.

I also found this which may interest you:

From - antlawyers.vn

Divorce of foreigner to a VNese citizen must be consulted by the Marriage Consultancy Center. Not sure it applies to you.

If marriage registration between a foreigner and a Vietnamese belongs one of the following cases, Vietnamese citizen must be consulted by the provincial Marriage Consultancy Center: i) the age gap between two partners is 20 years or more; ii) this is the third marriage of the foreign partner, or the foreign partner has gone through a divorce with a Vietnamese citizen; iii) the partners do not completely understand about the families and backgrounds of each other; about the languages, traditions, customs, cultures, and laws on marriage and families of each other’s country.

Read more: http://www.antlawyers.vn/library/proced … z5pNRMlrBg

I'm not sure if you're ever planning on living in the U.S. with your future wife but just make sure that if you get a prenup in Vietnam, that it will be valid in the U.S... that's very important. So my question would be, is a pre-nup legalized in Vietnam valid in the U.S. system?

I've come to my senses since posting this thread and decided I will never marry again or sponsor again. I asked my friends to hit me on the head if that ever changes, and shoot me with a shotgun close range if I don't heed their warnings.

WillyBaldy :

I've come to my senses since posting this thread and decided I will never marry again or sponsor again. I asked my friends to hit me on the head if that ever changes, and shoot me with a shotgun close range if I don't heed their warnings.

I've been under the impression that you're going to marry your gf.  Has that plan been changed?

Ciambella :
WillyBaldy :

I've come to my senses since posting this thread and decided I will never marry again or sponsor again. I asked my friends to hit me on the head if that ever changes, and shoot me with a shotgun close range if I don't heed their warnings.

I've been under the impression that you're going to marry your gf.  Has that plan been changed?

Yeah I was under that impression too! But then I panicked and reality struck me. She's an amazing girl and deserves someone who will devote himself 100%. My sister is relieved, but my Vietnamese friend doesn't understand my decision. It's a matter of perspective I guess  :unsure

PS: I'm still helping my first Vietnamese wife financially for school (not by obligation because she wanted zero in the divorce) so I've got enough on my shoulders for now  :D

Yogis just figured something out.

If they took out all the threads on disfunctional  & failed relationships,  shitty property deals ,  cowboy Visa agents  & broke bogans trying to live here on $500 bucks a month.......

What would be left.🤪

I’ll bet the advertisers on this site are raising their glasses in a toast to all those shifty devious little characters that Expats have the unfortunate experience in dealing with.

Yogis creed.....No hooks, No baggage , No passengers

So far ,,so good. 🐾🐾

Another thing Yogi has become aware of...

Too many men are of the belief that women marry for money...

They don’t......they only divorce you for it.

Yogi met a nice young lady a few years back that actually demanded we go to Australia, I also find  her a job & the white picket pence etc etc.

Yogi said.....it appears that you have a high priority on the financial aspect of this relationship.   She actually said “YES....I will never marry a poor person. “

Yogis reply......” I won’t either”  😆

Well to be fair she was quite honest about it though, +1 to her.

My ex wife always told me as a "joke" that she married me for my nationality. I knew it was true (but it was not the only reason, she was also using me for sex), and only a few days ago she passed the Canadian citizenship test with 19/20. She was disappointed because of the failed question.

Anyway, we divorced in 2015 but she never stopped loving me and is still hoping we get back together one day. So what I'm trying to say here is, it's not always black and white. A Vietnamese woman might want to leave Vietnam at all cost, but it doesn't mean she's not looking for love at the same time.

As for myself, I actually got lucky in my insane decision to marry and sponsor a woman. I'm feeling lucky, the same way I'd feel lucky if I were hitting my head with a hammer and the hammer's handle would break in half.

Jaysuz Willy,,,

Shotguns,,hammers & marriages....😆😆😆

You should become a stuntman if you survive all that.

Yeah I can't believe I'm still alive, although I've lost my hair but that was a long time ago. I used to shave my head even when I was 20. Right now I'm savouring my celibacy and will always follow Yogi the Bear's calling.

This is no good Willy.
It kills off your faith in “human” nature.

And to think that you were being “used” for sex ( post #17).   😳

Yogi would suggest you get on the bandwagon of the #Me too movement. 

  Yogi suffered a similar situation by a clearly sexually frustrated young “lady” who treated me as though I was some kind of amusement park ride. 😳......and the worst thing is,,I’ve lost her phone number🤓

Maybe the forum could start a Free Willy campaign to assist in your recovery.

Don’t worry
Yogi’s in ya corner.

Freeing my Willy is of the utmost importance!

I also studied this issue to help a friend of mine. I will show you how to get the application procedure and the necessary forms of paper from where:
If a marriage is related to Canada or a Canadian immigrant visa you can visit the Canadian consular website later:
https://www.vfsglobal.ca/canada/vietnam/index.html.
There are clearly understandable procedures, sequences and reading in this website.
Good luck for u.

Yogi007 :

Yogi said.....it appears that you have a high priority on the financial aspect of this relationship.   She actually said “YES...I will never marry a poor person.

Yogis reply......” I won’t either”  😆

That same philosophy/life goal has been found everywhere, not just in Vietnam or Asia or any poor country but everywhere on earth, not just in modern time but probably from the beginning of time. 

From my old study, it had already existed during the Stuart, Georgian, Regency, and Victorian eras.  If I'm not mistaken, William Makepeace Thackeray wrote, via the voice of Arthur Pendennis, "It's as easy to marry a rich woman as a poor woman."  A few years before him, Caroline Kirkland in the US expressed the same sentiment repeatedly in Graham’s Magazine under different names.

Substitute the genders and that's the almost-ideal marriage, universally. 

I laughed and shook my head when watching Gentlemen Prefer Blondes, but the ditzy Lorelei Lee made me sit up and listen when she said "Don’t you know that a man being rich is like a girl being pretty?  You wouldn’t marry a girl just because she’s pretty, but my goodness, doesn’t it help? "

My husband and I have been through so many ups and downs, gains and losses, heartaches and headaches together, and even a few near-death and briefly-dead events.  We've disagreed as much as we've agreed with one another, and we've argued often but never about money.  That's not because we've such moralistic view about finance, but because as a couple, we've never been too poor that we couldn't pay the rent or put food on the table.  I've always thought our marriage is strong because of what we've been through together, but once or twice I've wondered whether it could still be that strong if, on top of everything else, we're also very poor.

First of all you need to define Rich & Poor.   
A number on a piece of paper, balance sheet or whatever , is just a number if the person it relates to lives like a schmuck.

And a lot of them do.   Their whole lives are devoted to building that number & trying to get onto the Forbes Rich list.    They crave money they don’t really need & have no intention of spending purely to have other shallow like minded people envious of them.   

I’ve spent years working on portfolios for people like that.    Funny thing is,,some of them occasionally mentioned the idea of retiring to some tropical island / climate & living the simple life.    I can’t recall any that did.   

One guy, at one stage one of Australia’s richest men ( dead now) spent his whole life fighting with family members , business competitors, regulatory bodies & anyone else who threatened his market share.  Most of his days were spent with lawyers in Court.   

After he died of a heart attack ( one of several) the son took over & done a good job of stuffing most of it up.    The stress on the son has put him into the “nut house” & he’s been on suicide watch at times.

You see this a lot.  Money is no guarantee of happiness.

I was back in Australia this month on a short regular visit.   The mood & the look on people’s faces walking the streets ( that’s if you can actually find someone walking anywhere) didn’t look anything like the smiling , busy & attentive looking people you see thousands of every day here in Vietnam.     

That’s what I like about SE Asia......the people look busy, happy & involved in their days.  They’re rich in life’s simple pleasures.

But getting back to relationships,,,,Yogi doesn’t want to be saddled with anyone purely because I’m picking up the meal tab.....

I totally agree with this statement:

"I was back in Australia this month on a short regular visit.   The mood & the look on people’s faces walking the streets ( that’s if you can actually find someone walking anywhere) didn’t look anything like the smiling , busy & attentive looking people you see thousands of every day here in Vietnam"

      It is the same depressing thing I witness when I visit Texas twice a year.  I begin missing Nha Trang when I board the plane.

Mark Tat :

I totally agree with this statement:

"I was back in Australia this month on a short regular visit.   The mood & the look on people’s faces walking the streets ( that’s if you can actually find someone walking anywhere) didn’t look anything like the smiling , busy & attentive looking people you see thousands of every day here in Vietnam"

      It is the same depressing thing I witness when I visit Texas twice a year.  I begin missing Nha Trang when I board the plane.

I think the cooler weather has a lot to do with it. I know when I lived in Australia during the cooler months there wasnt a lot of happiness around.
The Vietnamese are generally happy people which makes it nice when getting around and dealing with them.

I just wish they could drive a lot better and stop walking in front of my motorbike.

i really miss Vietnam. I'm in Northern California now. It's amazing how bad the food is.
Yes, I find the Vietnamese so very friendly and hard working. I admire them. They don't sit around and complain about what they don't have.
We;ll, at least not to me !!

This should be easy, i think you just need to bring the divorce documents to the department of foreign affair and ask them about the process, they should inform you about everything i guess, good luck

There is no need to apply the divorce paper in Vietnam in case your frouse's nationality is no longer is Vietnamese. But if your frouse is still one, just you need apply the divorce paper to the Department of Foreign Affair for them to legalize those paper. And that is it all you need. Please note that you may need to bring along with the documents your personal photo and Id/Passport because they may ask for those to cross-check the information, and the it will take no longer than 1 day IF they receives complete and valid documents.

letiendat :

There is no need to apply the divorce paper in Vietnam in case your frouse's nationality is no longer is Vietnamese. But if your frouse is still one, just you need apply the divorce paper to the Department of Foreign Affair for them to legalize those paper. And that is it all you need. Please note that you may need to bring along with the documents your personal photo and Id/Passport because they may ask for those to cross-check the information, and the it will take no longer than 1 day IF they receives complete and valid documents.

That's very interesting, thank you. Even though now as of today I don't think I'll ever get married again, it could be a good thing to bring my divorce papers in Vietnam for my next 6 months stay and have the divorce officialized there, as you never know that the future might bring!

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