IRELAND - WORK PERMITS

Non-EU/EEA citizens require to obtain a work permit to work in Ireland.

The Irish Government have recently (effective 26th March 2018), introduced The Employment Permits (Amendment) Regulations 2018.  The purpose of the new regulations was to introduce 2 lists:

List 1.   The Highly Skilled Eligible Occupations List, which specifically identifies which jobs, trades and/or professions are eligible for Highly Skilled Eligible Occupations work permits; this link will take you to the list.

List 2.  The Ineligible Categories of Employment List, which specifically identifies which jobs, trades and/or professions do not qualify for any work permits; this link will take you to the list.

It follows that people whose jobs, trades and/or professions appear in List 1 will, assuming they can find an employer willing to take them on, be able to apply for a work permit.  Conversely, those listed on List 2, will not be eligible to apply for any work permit.

The Irish Government do now and then make temporary exemptions to these lists; details of which can be found by following this link.

If you have any specific questions related to Work Permits in Ireland, please create a new thread in the forum below.

Hope this helps.

Cynic
Expat Team

I have a question, I'm a non-EU citizen and my husband is an EU one. He is from Croatia but now working in Dublin and my son and I will follow any time soon when I got my visa. I want to work in DUblin but my husband told me that I have to wait for 3 months before I can do so. Is there any alternative so that I can find job right away and not to wait for 3 months?Thank you.

Hello kabayan im not at this time the new requirements but please try to add John ferris on FB he can answer you anything about work permits and others..nandito kana sa Ireland?

rhose88 wrote:

I have a question, I'm a non-EU citizen and my husband is an EU one. He is from Croatia but now working in Dublin and my son and I will follow any time soon when I got my visa. I want to work in DUblin but my husband told me that I have to wait for 3 months before I can do so. Is there any alternative so that I can find job right away and not to wait for 3 months?Thank you.

Hi and welcome to the Forum.

I've just checked on the Irish Government website (link); the only reference I can find to 3 months is where it says in the Process section "An application for any employment permit must be received at least 12 weeks before the proposed employment start date.".  So that would seem to be the length of time they will take to issue the document.

However, one thing I did notice that is slightly more worrying is there is a section called "Dependants/Civil Partners/Spouses not eligible for the Dependent/Partner/Spouse Employment Permits" and one of those is "Non-EEA dependants/civil partners/spouses of EU nationals;", which I think would describe yourself; I suggest you read the original link carefully, because it may take a lot longer than 3 months before you get your permit.

Hope this helps.

Cynic
Expat Team

I find that my career (web designer/software programmer) is on the list for highly skilled workers who can apply for work permit.

Im 23 from Africa and recently got my bachelors in computer science in China im looking to move Ireland for work or internships. How hard will it be for me to find a job in Dublin or other cities.

Hi and welcome to the Forum.

Use Google to find the agencies dealing with your specific skill set; contact them as soon as possible; they will tell you what chances you have of getting work.

Hope this helps.

Cynic
Expat Team

Dear Cynic,
   I appreciate your valuable input to this forum. let me introduce myself. I'm from Sri Lanka, so I've been working as a software engineer at public university in SL for 3 years. I have my Bsc Hons degree in computing.
My question is do I need English language qualification to apply Ireland PR ? I couldn't find any sort of information related to that on the website.

How can I find job offer by Googling it?

I used to following LinkedIn contact for job hunting.

PR process info

Thanks.  :)

asela28sl wrote:

Dear Cynic,
   I appreciate your valuable input to this forum. let me introduce myself. I'm from Sri Lanka, so I've been working as a software engineer at public university in SL for 3 years. I have my Bsc Hons degree in computing.
My question is do I need English language qualification to apply Ireland PR ? I couldn't find any sort of information related to that on the website.

How can I find job offer by Googling it?

I used to following LinkedIn contact for job hunting.

PR process info

Thanks.  :)

Hi and thanks for the enquiry.

I don't think you will need a formal English qualification; you'll be interviewed in English; if they can't understand you, then you won't get the job.  Judging from your post, your English is OK, but not perfect, it is our accents that cause us issues.

You will not find a job offer on Google; if you do, it's almost certainly a scammer.  If anyone tells you that you have to pay anything at all as part of the interview/job seeking process, they are scammers.

Hope this helps.

Cynic
Expat Team

Hello friend,
     Yes indeed, I can't beat to the native speakers. So how can I find a job offer ?

I found this website which they post recent job advertisements.
   https://www.jobs.ie

Thanks

Hi again,

I just checked out your link; my advice would be to contact the agencies whose information is listed on those sites.  You can almost guarantee that the majority of the jobs you see advertised will already be gone, but they will have other ones of a similar type, so get their details and then e-mail them your CV.

There is an issue that all expats face when trying to get work in another country; unless your skills are in great demand and they can't recruit enough to meet that demand, the moment they discover that you can't attend an interview tomorrow, to start work the next day, they really aren't interested.

Hope this helps.

Cynic
Expat Team

Hi Cynic,

Your answer over here makes me worried. So my case is that since my husband got a job offer in dublin, I'm preparing my self to join him in ireland next months (thinking that I can work there with my permit from irish goverment of course). He is italian and I'm indonesian but living in Italy. I was hoping to find a job in ireland because base on what I read from this website

https://www.citizensinformation.ie/en/m … eland.html

I can work freely without having to gain any job offer as long as I apply the permission under EU Treaty Right as stated :

Right to work
EEA and Swiss citizens

If you are from an EU member state or one of the countries of the EEA or Switzerland, you are entitled to come to work in Ireland. You do not need an employment permit. You are entitled to have your dependants come to live with you. If your non-EEA spouse or civil partner is coming to live in Ireland with you, they must apply for permission to remain under EU Treaty Rights in order to have similar rights to live and work in Ireland.

Please let me know what do you think about this.

Cheers,
Lia

Hi and welcome to the Forum.

You say you are worried; your Forum information tells me nothing about you beyond your nationality, so perhaps it would be quicker and easier if you tell me what specifically you're worried about.

Reading between the lines.  Yes, once you've exercised your rights under the treaty, you can work, but you will first need to apply for and wait for a permit.  For that reason, unless you fall into the highly-skilled category, or have a skill/experience in something which is in great demand in Ireland, then applying for work from Italy is, for the reasons I've stated above, probably a waste of time.

Hope this helps.

Cynic
Expat Team

Cynic wrote:
rhose88 wrote:

I have a question, I'm a non-EU citizen and my husband is an EU one. He is from Croatia but now working in Dublin and my son and I will follow any time soon when I got my visa. I want to work in DUblin but my husband told me that I have to wait for 3 months before I can do so. Is there any alternative so that I can find job right away and not to wait for 3 months?Thank you.

Hi and welcome to the Forum.

I've just checked on the Irish Government website (link); the only reference I can find to 3 months is where it says in the Process section "An application for any employment permit must be received at least 12 weeks before the proposed employment start date.".  So that would seem to be the length of time they will take to issue the document.

However, one thing I did notice that is slightly more worrying is there is a section called "Dependants/Civil Partners/Spouses not eligible for the Dependent/Partner/Spouse Employment Permits" and one of those is "Non-EEA dependants/civil partners/spouses of EU nationals;", which I think would describe yourself; I suggest you read the original link carefully, because it may take a lot longer than 3 months before you get your permit.

Hope this helps.

Cynic
Expat Team

Hi Cynic,

I was posting the previous thread and said that I was worried because I read this answer of yours. the problem is I know that it will be highly impossible for a non EEA citizen to get a job offer in ireland. I thought that I got the permit to work automatically once I got the irish residence permit. CMIIW.

Hi Cynic,

I'm worried that I wont be able to work in ireland eventhough I will be having the IRP. I'm not looking for anything from italy and to be honest I wont look for anything until I get the IRP. I'm worried because in italy, once I got the permit as a spouse of EU/Italian I dont have to get a job offer in order to work nor change the type of my permit. but from the link that  you gave to that girl, it seems so complicated. while from the link I sent to you, it seems that the process is the same as Italy.

hope you can understand my question now?

Hi again.

I can't see your link yet (it's a restriction on the Forum - sorry).  But to try and answer your question; the Irish have become more restrictive and from what it says on the Irish Government website that I referred to in post 4 (please read the link I provided in that post), it does not appear to be quite as simple as it was for you in Italy where your work permit was inclusive with your residence permit.

Hope this helps.

Cynic
Expat Team

Hi Cynic,

it seems that they changed the law since  March 2019? I read this link and it seems now it almost the same as in Italy.

Ministers Humphreys and Flanagan announce change to immigration arrangements for spouses and partners of Critical Skills Employment Permit Holders and Researchers under a Hosting Agreement
6 March 2019

Change to give immediate and full access to the Irish Labour Market without the need for an employment permit
Heather Humphreys TD, Minister for Business, Enterprise and Innovation, and Charlie Flanagan TD, Minister for Justice and Equality, today (Wednesday, 6th March 2019) announced that the spouses and partners of Critical Skills Employment Permit holders and Researchers under a Hosting Agreement as provided for under the EU Third Country Researchers Directive (Council Directive 2005/71/EC) will be able to access the Irish labour market without the need to obtain an employment permit. This change will streamline existing processes and result in a more attractive offering for both investors and international talent.

Revised Immigration Arrangements for the Spouses and De-Facto Partners of Critical Skills Employment Permit (CSEP) Holders and Researchers Under a Hosting Agreement
The requirement for spouses and de-facto partners to obtain an employment permit has now been removed by the Department of Business, Enterprise and Innovation (DBEI). The Irish Naturalisation and Immigration Service (INIS) will grant eligible spouses and de-facto partners of CSEP holders and Researchers under a Hosting Agreement permission to reside in this State on Stamp 1 Conditions which provides direct access to the labour market without the need to obtain an employment permit.

whatever it is, with job or not I have to move to ireland anyway. Thank you so much for your answer.

Lia

Hi again.

If your husband is moving to Ireland under a "Critical Skills Employment Permit Holders and Researchers under a Hosting Agreement"; then yes I agree with you because that is what your quote is referring to.

Hope this helps.

Cynic
Expat Team

Hi,

I am currently on a Critical Skills permit and it will be 12 months at the end of August.

My question is what would happen if I were to apply for a job with another employer?

I spoke to an garda immigration officer and he recommended to me that I stay put until I have done 2 my two years. At the end of the two years I can then get a stamp 4 and get another 2 years on my permit and within those two years I am free to go with any employer I choose.

My partner lives in Galway and I live in Kildare and therefore I am looking to move closer to her. I have gotten a few messages from recruiters and companies out west and that is why I am tempted to apply and go for the roles.

Is the immigration officer correct? Should I stay where I am and be patient.

What would happen if I did apply to another role and got offered the position? How would this affect my current permit situation?

Any guidance or information that you could give me would be appreciated.

Thanks :)

Hi and welcome to the Forum.

Forgive my bluntness, but you've already got the answer to your question from a regulatory source; there's nobody on here that will trump what they say.

You haven't told us what you do (and you don't have to), but there are very strict rules regarding the grant of Irish Employment permits; these rules change constantly, as does the list of jobs that qualify (the last revision was 2 days ago).  It could be that the reason you are currently in Ireland no longer qualifies for an employment permit and if you re-apply, you'll get rejected immediately and have to leave; but if you wait until the 2 year period is up, you then automatically qualify to extend without the initial restriction.

So, I suspect that the advice you were given by your Immigration Officer is sound; we need to find another way around the obstacle; you mentioned your "partner"; if this is a meaningful and long-term relationship and she is an Irish or EU citizen, perhaps you could apply for a different kind of visa along the lines of family unification - this link will take you to the Irish Governments website that deals with this.

Hope this helps.

Cynic
Expat Team

Hi Cynic, my spouse recently moved to Ireland and works as a registered nurse. She recently applied for work permit and is waiting for it to be issued. She is a diploma holder and as a result even though her job being in highly skilled list the work permit that she applied for is the general work permit rather than critical skills. I want to know the time frame from when I can accompany her as a dependent and whether I can be able to work in Ireland after my arrival. Waiting for your valuable response.

RJY333 wrote:

Hi Cynic, my spouse recently moved to Ireland and works as a registered nurse. She recently applied for work permit and is waiting for it to be issued. She is a diploma holder and as a result even though her job being in highly skilled list the work permit that she applied for is the general work permit rather than critical skills. I want to know the time frame from when I can accompany her as a dependent and whether I can be able to work in Ireland after my arrival. Waiting for your valuable response.

Hi and welcome to the Forum.

You need a visa in order to join your wife, namely a "Join Family Visa"; the process is described on the Irish Government website; this link will take you there.  According to the website, non-critical skills permit holders will have to wait 12 months before you can apply, it also says that your application can take a further 6 > 12 months to be granted.

Probably not what you want to hear.

Hope this helps.

Cynic
Expat Team

Thanks for your reply. I have one more question which is after reaching there will I be able to work without a work permit or should I have to apply for a work permit with occupation that meets LMIA criteria?

RJY333 wrote:

Thanks for your reply. I have one more question which is after reaching there will I be able to work without a work permit or should I have to apply for a work permit with occupation that meets LMIA criteria?

To be honest, it's too far in the future for me to be advising you on what Irish immigration law may look like in 2 years time; they are revising the rules every couple of months and there is no constitution that locks this kind of thing into the law.

Hi, sorry its been long that I log in here. I'm now 8 months here in Dublin as I arrived last December. To those who are following this thread.No worries, EU spouses can work in any EU countries without problem as stated in EU Treaty rights. Therefore, when I came to Dublin last December.I immediately registered my TAx and PPS then send CV's after 2 weeks of familiarizing Dublin. I started working in a Creche and Montesorri school in January. Lucky me I think cuz childcare here in Ireland is always hiring. Got 3 interviews and got offered all from them but I chose the closest one from my apartment. SO, if ever you are an educator or working in Early Childhood Education don't hesitate to contact me if you have any questions in job hunting.

If you are applying for EU treaty rights as spouse of an EU citizen..you can start workign even if your application for IRP is still in the process. Your visa must be family visa.

Hi rhose88,

I've been researching on immigrationboards.com and similar forums and people are saying that spouses of EU/Irish citizens require a Stamp 4 visa (not sure if this is the same as a "family visa") and are still waiting on these for almost 12 months or more. You can only apply for jobs once you have a Stamp 4 permit according to them.

Is this family visa you refer to something different? If so, what forms did you fill out and what supporting documents are required? Did you obtain a stamp 4 immediately or how long did you have to wait?

I'm a non-EEA spouse of an Irish citizen looking to work in Ireland from the first month upon arrival to Ireland so I'm keen to hear what people are doing and if they succeed in getting the required permits.

Thanks

Hi. I have a question. I'm from South Africa and I have been offered a job in Ireland, in Dublin on a Critical Skills work permit. My boyfriend is also South African and I would like for him to join me when I move there in January 2020.

Initially we were planning on having him join based on Defacto partnership but we have not been together for 2 years, nor lived together for that amount of time so it seems that is not an option. Our only other option now is to get married. We have always planed to get married but hadn't been financially able yet.

My worries are:

1.  that we will get married soon after I have received my CSEP so I am worried that INIS might question the validity or reasons for our marriage and possibly not allow him to stay. Is this usually an issue?

2. SA is a non-visa country so he can join me on a 3 month tourist visa and we can apply for him to stay in Ireland upon arrival but he would have to give up his job in SA to come for that 3 months. What if his spouse visa is not approved in that 3 months? Will he have to go back and await approval? That would really not be ideal as he would be unemployed there. What happens in such cases?

Thank you

Hi and welcome to the Forum.

Marriage validity - if you've only known each other for a short time, then yes, that will be an issue.  In general terms, they are looking for proof of a lasting and meaningful relationship; so any evidence of having been together, photos, correspondence, invoices in both names that kind of thing.

Go back - I don't know for certain, but logic tells me he will have to return if he is denied any kind of visa, otherwise, it's pointless.

Hope this helps.

Cynic
Expat Team

Thank you for your response.

Is there a general relationship duration they want in these kinds of cases? And do you think going about the application through an immigration solicitor may be beneficial?

Thanks again.

I don't there is a time line set in stone, certainly it would raise questions if it was a few months, but sure the longer proof can be given less of a worry it would be. Thats my guess, maybe Cynic has other information.

Hi again.

I just checked the INNIS website, it does state:

INNIS wrote:

...... and who have been together in a relationship similar to marriage or civil partnership, have been living together for at least two years and have a mutual commitment to a shared life together to the exclusion of all others.

So if you wish to move together, then I think marriage is your only real option - sorry.

Immigration Lawyer - there is nothing they do that you can't do yourself; if you have the money and are certain of your case and just don't want the hassle, then why not use one.

Hope this helps.

Cynic
Expat Team

Thank you very much.

We will just apply and hope for the best.

Then I wish you both the best of luck in your journey.  :top:

hi Cynic!
What about Non - EC students, which want to improve English by language course more then 24 week, visa D.
On the sites these E.school saying about 20 hour/ week half-time work permit.
In fact, IMHO, student may have the trouble with PPS number.
Please  give an answer:
Have ''work and study" student trouble with PPS number?
What about half-time jobs? May student to get same vacation?
Sorry my English, I have been studying. Thanks in advance.

sasbor1 wrote:

hi Cynic!
What about Non - EC students, which want to improve English by language course more then 24 week, visa D.
On the sites these E.school saying about 20 hour/ week half-time work permit.
In fact, IMHO, student may have the trouble with PPS number.
Please  give an answer:
Have ''work and study" student trouble with PPS number?
What about half-time jobs? May student to get same vacation?
Sorry my English, I have been studying. Thanks in advance.

Hi and welcome to the Forum.

You've confused me; you start off by saying "In fact", then you say "may have", where have you got your facts from and why do you think these events may cause you trouble with a PPS number, more importantly, what events and what trouble - specifically?

Cynic
Expat Team

Hi again.
If to be correct than  '' on my humble opinion''.
I get information from internet, google, YouTube. So, I want to believe these bloggers and I had written 'In fact' as for me.
I'm hoping you understood me :gloria

sasbor1 wrote:

Hi again.
If to be correct than  '' on my humble opinion''.
I get information from internet, google, YouTube. So, I want to believe these bloggers and I had written 'In fact' as for me.
I'm hoping you understood me :gloria

Hi again.

If I thought for one moment you were being humble, then it would be appropriate, but you're not, so let's move on eh?

In order to answer your question(s), it would be helpful if you could answer my previous questions.

Cynic
Expat Team

Hello good day!
My name is Melissa Mohammed and i am trying to move to Ireland.
I am a qualified attorney from Trinidad and Tobago.  Would it be wise to apply for a work permit? I am currently trying to find a training contract to be able to practice law in Ireland and I am finding it nearly impossible after trying since 2019.

Regards
Melissa Mohammed

Melissat.m15 wrote:

Hello good day!
My name is Melissa Mohammed and i am trying to move to Ireland.
I am a qualified attorney from Trinidad and Tobago.  Would it be wise to apply for a work permit? I am currently trying to find a training contract to be able to practice law in Ireland and I am finding it nearly impossible after trying since 2019.

Regards
Melissa Mohammed

Hi Melissa and welcome to the Forum.

As you have found out, you need a work permit in order to work in Ireland.  Further, they operate a "Critical Skills" scheme where they describe occupations of which they are looking for people and a similar list of occupations for which they will not issue a work permit.  Unfortunately, an attorney (a "lawyer" in Ireland) does not feature on the Critical Skills list, so you will not be able to get a work permit to practice law in Ireland.  There is an exception for "....... employment of a person fluent in the official language, apart from English, of a State which is not a member State of the EEA and who has market knowledge of the non-EEA state".  So, if you could find a job that fitted in that specific category and nobody else in Ireland could fill that role, then you could apply for a permit.

Probably not what you were hoping for, but I wish you the best of luck in your legal career in Trinidad and Tobago.

Hope this helps.

Cynic
Expat Team

Thank you!
I am confused though because the law society of ireland told me it will be no problem

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