A business of English language centre

Hello,All
I am an Egyptian English language trainer,planning to move to Turkey (specifically in YaLova).
Do you think doing a business in an English Language training centre is a profitable and good idea?
What do ,you think, the factors that support this project idea?
Thank you for sharing in advance

I have to be a little brutal here - not with your standard of English.

If you're hiring teachers to do the work your poor abilities are unimportant but you say you're a trainer, and you shouldn't be.
Your grammar and punctuation are horrible and your ability to construct a sentence is pitiful.

I apologise for being horrible but you did ask for factors that could influence your potential business, and lousy English is very likely to have a negative effect.

I am very happy that your comment is the first,as it is a proof that I will be successful businessman just to teach people like you to be more polite and civilized even if you are not Turkish,it will be a good opportunity to get learners of other nationalities to train them on how to get human behaviour rather than the picture of your profile that represents you character.
Thank you so much
:cool:

Hi,

In my observations, there not many locals who are keen on learning the language. There are certain English language institutes in Turkey, though your main concern will be target market.
Also, in such an environment, quality will be crucial. The only successful language institutes in Turkey are the ones that are actually offering a quality certificate.

Good luck

Abdulmotaal :

Hello,All
I am an Egyptian English language trainer,planning to move to Turkey (specifically in YaLova).
Do you think doing a business in an English Language training centre is a profitable and good idea?
What do ,you think, the factors that support this project idea?
Thank you for sharing in advance

Seriously, dude, there is no way you should be teaching English when your own skills are so poor.
Apart from the obvious fact you'll be wasting your students' time and money, you could also damage their education.

As I said, if you aren't teaching it doesn't matter, but it looks like you intend to attempt it, and that is bad for profits if your customers find out you can't teach or even speak the language properly.

You might not like the answer but it remains true.

Fred, you would actually be surprised at the level of the English teachers that I have seen here.. Which includes 'native' English speakers too..  Seriously!! *rolling eyes*

Fred :

Seriously, dude, there is no way you should be teaching English when your own skills are so poor.
Apart from the obvious fact you'll be wasting your students' time and money, you could also damage their education.

As I said, if you aren't teaching it doesn't matter, but it looks like you intend to attempt it, and that is bad for profits if your customers find out you can't teach or even speak the language properly.

You might not like the answer but it remains true.

Xeeschan
Thank you for your appreciated and considerable advice.
Have a goid day

No problem...

Good luck

Abdulmotaal :

Xeeschan
Thank you for your appreciated and considerable advice.
Have a goid day

Fred,the sheep represetative,sorry but I don't have enough time to reply to such idiot comments like yours.
Greetings :top:

Just to start up an English Language Center in Turkey is an expensive startup.  Just googling English Courses in Yalova brings up tons of centers who not only have a good reputation but people know the name and brand.

My friend started a language course (offering 5 languages) and the one reason why they might just make it and be successful is because they only offer speaking and listening practice.  Most of these language courses have a hard emphasis on writing and reading, to which Turkish citizens mostly do not need or care for.

Had you started a language course that has an entirely unique and different approach, it will still be expensive, you have heavy competition, being a non-native English speaker does not help your reputation whatsoever (just as it would for me opening up an Arabic language school).  Turkey honestly does not need another English grammar school, the ones with more money and experience than you do not have full classrooms for a reason.

If you wanted to be successful:

1.  Have a lot of money.  Any business here is expensive to start up and renting a place, hiring teachers, making material and marketing will cost you a lot.

2.  Learn Turkish, your not going to find it easy whatsoever to make any business here and not know Turkish.

3.  Do not make another grammar school, open up just a speaking and listening course and hire ONLY native English speakers.  If your school is full of non-native English speakers there will be heavy skepticism...afterall if I go to an Arabic course, I would want a native Arab speaker...right?  If you want to copy what schools are already doing here, you will fail.  You need to have an entirely different approach.

4.  Realize that it will be very difficult and your competition already owns the English language market.  Sure if you actually do make it you will earn lots of Money...but the road is really difficult, its not a unique business.  I can almost throw a rock here and hit an English school. 

FYI:  Fred is right, my Arabic is at a beginner level, I cant imagine asking seriously to open an Arabic School if my Arabic isn't nearly perfect.  If someone asks me seriously to open an English School and their English themselves wasn't that great, it looks like we are just speaking about dreams and not reality.  You are new to this site, I wouldn't go around being so hot-headed to other members.  Thats not very mannerful of you, which is ironic since you plan to apparently teach manners to people here in Turkey.

Xeeschan :

Fred, you would actually be surprised at the level of the English teachers that I have seen here.. Which includes 'native' English speakers too..  Seriously!! *rolling eyes*

Yep, I interviewed a guy today who was seriously crap.
He'd been teaching English for years but his abilities were atrocious at best. Quite how he got the jobs he claims is flabbergasting.

When I worked as an ESL teacher in a private school here, I interviewed a Turkish woman WHO had a degree in English from a REALLY good university.

Not only did she ask we do the interview in Turkish, but when we sampled her classroom teaching skills the students looked at me like "is this a joke?"  Not only were the students better at her with English but it was painful to watch.

I also know a man who has a PHD in English literatüre, and cannot speak English whatsoever.  It was more of a drunk latin if I were to call it a language.

I know Turkey wont be like this in the future, but my God how funny it is now...

I prefer you open in are where there are Arabs for the elite in turkey go to international schools where native teachers are.As for the others they are not interested to learn foreign language. Arabs learn the language to go for ILETS for migration reasons. Be careful where you start for Syrians has opened centers already.

In all honesty, you are absolutely right to be leveling the language-skill that is a dire need in the teaching field. However, let's get back to the reality of doing this job in Turkey, and please don't let my words piss anyone off, if you think differently than myself, please inform me, since I am in this field.

Turkey, a country where regardless of the requested teaching, they rather spend an immense amount of money on "NATIVES" rather than quality-based teachers. So in this sense, our Egyptian ENGLISH friend has an upper hand. Another truth about Turkey one should really focus on is that the quality that makes up the NAME of the teacher. If you want to be stable in this business you need to be able to keep up the greatness within your students and keep up the greatness at all times.

I am currently located in Bilecik and would like to meet and discuss other details with all expats.
Take care!

Hello Abdulmotaal,

I have just across your post on opening the education center in Turkey, and I was wondering what happened? Did you establish an educational center or not? If so, how is it going and can you give me some insight into it.
Thanks a lot,
Akmal.

Hello, there are many foreign language centers in Turkey owned by Turkish citizens  offering this type of service .I don't think the government will allow a foreigner to do that.
Foreigners are allowed to do business with strong financial investments (250000 dollars at least).
Also there are many native English speakers from Middle Eastern origin who were born and raised in America and Canada that work in English Teaching in schools and centers.
Finally, there are government agencies now teaching English for free to Turkish citizens
So competition is very high.
If you would like to start this business in Egypt it will be more profitable.

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