Has anyone gone through the simplified naturalization precedure?

Many groups of people in Hungary were left in the cold because of moving land borders.
My grandmother was born in Austro-Hungary and my father in Poland. Both were born in the same house.
My husband's step-father was German but his family lived in Erdely for ages.
After WW11 they were removed from the land and homes and moved to Hungary.
Had to start over again after his 5 or 6 years in a Russian POW camp, forced labor in a mine.
Came home to his land in Erdely to find another man, his wives new husband in his home with their new child.
He left on his own, gave them everything but still had to leave the area because he was German by blood.
I may just look at my files where i have stored the family tree from my father's side.
Goes back nearly 300 years and there are tons of Hungarian surnames in the mix.

Marilyn Tassy :

Many groups of people in Hungary were left in the cold because of moving land borders.
My grandmother was born in Austro-Hungary and my father in Poland. Both were born in the same house.
My husband's step-father was German but his family lived in Erdely for ages.
After WW11 they were removed from the land and homes and moved to Hungary.
Had to start over again after his 5 or 6 years in a Russian POW camp, forced labor in a mine.
Came home to his land in Erdely to find another man, his wives new husband in his home with their new child.
He left on his own, gave them everything but still had to leave the area because he was German by blood.
I may just look at my files where i have stored the family tree from my father's side.
Goes back nearly 300 years and there are tons of Hungarian surnames in the mix.

Mein Gott, that's almost a total story in itself or a movie.  That sounds almost like the plot of what could be a great movie like The Way Back (I liked this movie by the way).

Surely now Marilyn, this has to be written down for your second forthcoming book.

It's got just about everything - deprivation, sacrifice, survival, love affair and eventual renewal all against a backdrop of the horror of conflict.

It's really a story I'd like to read or watch on the big screen.

And these shifting borders are no relic of the past. They continue to our own time. Think the breakups of the USSR and Yugoslavia, the takeover of Crimea, the return to China of Hong Kong and Macau, the creation of East Timor, etc.

And more no doubt on the way.

The Republic of Scotland, anyone?

Just to update the question I raised a couple of days ago.

I took a look again at the Serbian forum I mentioned here before. There's no suggestion there, even in posts within the last year, that Simplified Naturalization is now limited to ethnic Hungarians in certain cases.

As here, forum posts continue to say what counts is citizenship of your ancestor, so an ancestor born in Vojvodina (N Serbia) or continental Croatia before Trianon counts.

Not to say this is definitive, but if there had been a change of rules, I would have expected it to be news on that forum, since many Serbians applying for Simplified Naturalization do have no Hungarian ancestry.

There's also much other useful information on the forum, especially concerning the language interview and fussiness about name discrepancies in documents. The forum can be easily read with Google Translate.

The forum has changed address, though.

http://madjarskodrzavljanstvo.com

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