Updated last year

If you intend to relocate in Malta, you will probably have queries regarding travelling to Malta with your pet, if you have any. You can, of course, take your pets with you if you are planning to make a long stay in the country! But keep in mind that advance planning is required.

In general, dogs, cats, and ferrets are rather welcome in Malta, provided they have been vaccinated against rabies. Different conditions apply to pets coming from rabies-free countries and those coming from countries where there is a higher risk of rabies.

Travelling to Malta with your pet

Malta follows standard EU regulations for the import of pets and requirements associated with crossing borders. To ensure your pet can safely enter Malta, it is always best to confirm current requirements specific to your situation well in advance of your relocation.

When travelling to Malta with your pet, you must first request for a pet import authorisation from the Ministry of Agriculture. The required forms can be found via the links here.

Your pet must wear an intradermal 15-digit electronic identification microchip corresponding to ISO 11784/11785 norms; it must have been correctly implanted by a licensed veterinarian. In case your pet is equipped with a different model, you must be in possession of the adapting scanner. Alternatively, a clearly readable tattoo applied before 3 July 2011 may be accepted.

If your pet comes from a country that is rabies-free or at low risk of rabies, it must still be vaccinated by an authorised veterinarian against this pathology 21 days prior to its import to Malta.

Dogs travelling to Malta also require a treatment against tapeworms with a Praziquantel-based product between 24-120 hours prior to arrival in Malta. This administration must be certified in the specified section of your pet’s passport.

Animals coming from Ireland, Finland, Norway, and the UK are exempted from this requirement.

Your pet must have a pet passport if it comes from a European Union country.

Bringing your pet from a third country

In case your pet has lived in a country at high-risk of rabies, it must first be fitted with an intradermal microchip and then be vaccinated against rabies.

Your pet will then undergo a blood titer test at least 30 days after the vaccination date, but not less than three months before the date of arrival in Malta. The blood sample will be sent to an approved laboratory. If the results measure a satisfactory level, the veterinarian will issue a pet health certificate.

As regards the pet health certificate, it can vary from one country to another, but it remains an essential document for your pet to be allowed into the country by the Customs Department. The health certificate must be issued by a licensed veterinarian within 10 days of travel to Malta..

Again, all dogs travelling to Malta also require a treatment against tapeworms with a Praziquantel-based product between 24-120 hours prior to arrival in Malta. This administration must be certified in the specified section of your pet’s passport.

Cats and dogs are examined by licensed veterinarians upon their arrival in Malta. In case they present symptoms of transmissible diseases, you will have to bear the costs of thorough health examinations.

Other pets travelling to Malta

If you are importing a bird, invertebrate, tropical fish, reptile, amphibian or a mammal (rodent or rabbit) from other EU states or other approved countries/territories, these do not have to be vaccinated against rabies.

However, they must be in possession of a health certificate to be allowed to enter Maltese territory. Make sure to seek all relevant information from your home country's health and sanitary authorities. Rabbits and rodents imported from third countries may face quarantine restrictions.

If you are importing a tortoise or a parrot, make sure to check out the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES – link below), which is responsible for the protection of some species against import and export.

In this case, you are required to seek a special permit from the CITES. Feel free to seek more information from your home country's veterinarian authorities, for example, from the Ministry of Agriculture and Fisheries.

 Important:

Dogs, cats, and ferrets younger than 15 weeks of age cannot be imported into Malta.

 Useful links:

Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora – CITES
Department of Agriculture Guidelines
Air Malta regulations for travelling with pets
Pet Travel Malta

We do our best to provide accurate and up to date information. However, if you have noticed any inaccuracies in this article, please let us know in the comments section below.