Marriage Certificate 'Legalisation' for KITAP

Morning

I'm married to a local and have a wife sponsored KITAS; the procedure was straightforward though time consuming. Our next step is for a KITAP application and we have all the documentation except . . . a 'legalised' marriage certificate from the UK.

Strap in for the adventure, which I am sure others may have experienced.

Preparation

Before our UK marriage seven years ago, we had asked about procedures at Sipil, Surabaya, the home city of my wife, and were told what we needed to do to 'legalise' our UK marriage . . . basically have our certificate translated into Bahasa Indonesia. They subsequently issued a PPLN from Sipil in Surabaya for our marriage, the final stage in the registration process . . . or so we thought

I am now told by Renon, Bali Immigration that this document should not have been issued without a UK 'legalised' marriage certificate.

Recent Events

Renon, Bali Immigration told me I would have to travel to the Indonesia Embassy in the UK to get my marriage certificate 'legalised'. That of course is a little crazy given the expense and I pushed for an alternative. They then admitted that previous applicants in a similar situation had visited the Ministry of Foreign Affairs in Jakarta and had the document 'legalised' there. They even showed me the paperwork.

Of course on contacting the Ministry, they say they cannot carry out this procedure, contradicting the advice from Renon, Bali Immigration. They quote the passage from https://www.kemlu.go.id/id/Pelayanan-Ke … kumen.aspx" :

The Ministry of Foreign Affairs only accepts:

Domestic published documents to be used abroad after obtaining legalization from the Civil Directorate, Ministry of Law & Human Rights. Foreign documents are used for domestic use after obtaining legalization from Indonesian Representatives abroad or Foreign Country Representatives in Indonesia.

So, i contacted the UK Embassy in Jakarta, who are most unhelpful to be honest. I even tweeted the ambassador, Moazzam Malik, but he has twice not even responded to me. Their website - they won't enter into email dialogue with a mailer - simply do not legalise marriage certificates despite the fact the Indonesian authorities would accept that.

I then contacted the Indonesian Embassy in London. I received good help from their staff and even entered dialogue with the ambassador, Rizal Sukma, by twitter and email. Unfortunately, they have a website which allows those living in the UK - you need visa proof to confirm that - or those outside the UK (except Indonesia) - visa proof again required - to proceed with 'legalisation'. They appear otherwise inflexible to deal online.

Moving forward

I have now by chance found a link from the UK

Embassy https://assets.publishing.service.g...ile/729574/Legalising_a_signature_or_seal.pdf

that states the process to 'legalise' as follows:

1. Contact the legalisation Office in the UK - they offer an excellent online service (the process is known as apostille)
2. Take the document to the Indonesian Embassy
3. Take it to the Ministry of Foreign Affairs in Jakarta

My plan is to use the online service and have a family member based in the UK take the certificate to the Embassy before returning it to me. I will then take it to Jakarta. I have emailed them to confirm if a family member is able to do this.

My question is, has anyone done this and can confirm that this procedure is that which is required as no-one seems to be have the knowledge or authority to confirm it at all.

Thanks in advance for anyone who made it through my post.

You've kopped for duff one.
"Legalised", as far as any of my document went, meant legalised by the appropriate authority in the UK, Admiralty arch at the time, but now HERE.
This was accepted up to the end of 2017 as far as my experience went but I have no knowledge after that date.

I was told the British embassy in Jakarta can offer the service but that needs to be checked as I've never used it.

Best thing to do is to make an appointment at the British embassy, ask your questions and provide your papers. Things have changed with legalising marriages in the UK and here from 7 years ago.
You should follow the advice for UK.gov and also from the Indonesian ministries. The issue the wedding certificates were not legalised at the start so catching up here is always the issue.

But good luck, It will be ok at the end of the day, even if the day is more than 24 hours long!

Fred :

You've kopped for duff one.
"Legalised", as far as any of my document went, meant legalised by the appropriate authority in the UK, Admiralty arch at the time, but now HERE.
This was accepted up to the end of 2017 as far as my experience went but I have no knowledge after that date.

I was told the British embassy in Jakarta can offer the service but that needs to be checked as I've never used it.

Hi Fred, cheers for the interest.

Unfortunately, the British embassy in Jakarta will NOT get involved with marriage certificates.

lukereg :

Best thing to do is to make an appointment at the British embassy, ask your questions and provide your papers. Things have changed with legalising marriages in the UK and here from 7 years ago.
You should follow the advice for UK.gov and also from the Indonesian ministries. The issue the wedding certificates were not legalised at the start so catching up here is always the issue.

But good luck, It will be ok at the end of the day, even if the day is more than 24 hours long!

Hi lukereg, thanks for the interest.

One piece of advice from the Indonesian Ministry, if you read my post, was to get it legalised from the British Embassy but . . . as I've mentioned above, the British Embassy simply want nothing to do with Marriage certificates whether I make an appointment or not.

I have today though received further 'clarification' from Immigration (Renon) if you can call it that . . . they state the Indonesian Embassy in the UK is the place to go BUT . . . you may get 'lucky' and get it legalised at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs in Jakarta. When i told them of the reluctance of the Ministry to do that, they said . . . it depends who you ask and if your luck is in.

As such the wife is off to Jakarta soon to 'try her luck'.

It can only be legalised within the Uk, no overseas embassy can do this any longer, probably the last 2 years or so, if you google “legalising uk documents” similar
They is a service that will do this international postage with the service is around £100 or so sending by DHL for delivery within 36/48 hrs is about £30 plus the £100 (estimate)

Google “legalising a british birth certificate”

Thanks mate.

Will do this.

Gwmeath :

Google “legalising a british birth certificate”

https://www.get-document-legalised.serv … ct-service

Ok, just to put this thread to bed. I sent the original UK marriage certificate to the UK legalisation office. They sent it to my UK based parents who took it to the Indonesian Embassy in the UK. They 'legalised' it and my parents have now sent it back to Indonesia for me to start the KITAP procedure.

Both of these steps appear necessary BUT the Embassy will only do their bit . . . they are bound by law . . . if you are registered and have a 'lapor diri', a sort of registration for a visit to a foreign country for Indonesian citizens. We actually found the Embassy website procedure was not flexible for us - we were trying to register a trip and marriage from the past - but did it through the Ministry for Foreign affairs website and it very very straight forward. They mailed us the copy and sent it to the Embassy in the UK. Cost 50 pounds English for the two legalisations and about that again for postage.

Sorted quite easily in the end BUT repeated emailing and tweeting to ambassadors and embassy staff had been mixed and none of them appeared to appreciate our situation, offering incomplete support despite a willing attitude to assist.

Regards

The British embassy in Jakarta are pretty useless, never offering or actually doing anything that's any good to British citizens.
If it costs them any money, forget it, they won't do it.
If it costs little or nothing, expect a big bill.
Basically, they're rubbish.

happygreenfrog :

Morning

I'm married to a local and have a wife sponsored KITAS; the procedure was straightforward though time consuming. Our next step is for a KITAP application and we have all the documentation except . . . a 'legalised' marriage certificate from the UK.

Strap in for the adventure, which I am sure others may have experienced.

Preparation

Before our UK marriage seven years ago, we had asked about procedures at Sipil, Surabaya, the home city of my wife, and were told what we needed to do to 'legalise' our UK marriage . . . basically have our certificate translated into Bahasa Indonesia. They subsequently issued a PPLN from Sipil in Surabaya for our marriage, the final stage in the registration process . . . or so we thought

I am now told by Renon, Bali Immigration that this document should not have been issued without a UK 'legalised' marriage certificate.

Recent Events

Renon, Bali Immigration told me I would have to travel to the Indonesia Embassy in the UK to get my marriage certificate 'legalised'. That of course is a little crazy given the expense and I pushed for an alternative. They then admitted that previous applicants in a similar situation had visited the Ministry of Foreign Affairs in Jakarta and had the document 'legalised' there. They even showed me the paperwork.

Of course on contacting the Ministry, they say they cannot carry out this procedure, contradicting the advice from Renon, Bali Immigration. They quote the passage from https://www.kemlu.go.id/id/Pelayanan-Ke … aspx" :

The Ministry of Foreign Affairs only accepts:

Domestic published documents to be used abroad after obtaining legalization from the Civil Directorate, Ministry of Law & Human Rights. Foreign documents are used for domestic use after obtaining legalization from Indonesian Representatives abroad or Foreign Country Representatives in Indonesia.

So, i contacted the UK Embassy in Jakarta, who are most unhelpful to be honest. I even tweeted the ambassador, Moazzam Malik, but he has twice not even responded to me. Their website - they won't enter into email dialogue with a mailer - simply do not legalise marriage certificates despite the fact the Indonesian authorities would accept that.

I then contacted the Indonesian Embassy in London. I received good help from their staff and even entered dialogue with the ambassador, Rizal Sukma, by twitter and email. Unfortunately, they have a website which allows those living in the UK - you need visa proof to confirm that - or those outside the UK (except Indonesia) - visa proof again required - to proceed with 'legalisation'. They appear otherwise inflexible to deal online.

Moving forward

I have now by chance found a link from the UK

Embassy https://assets.publishing.service.g...ile/729574/Legalising_a_signature_or_seal.pdf

that states the process to 'legalise' as follows:

1. Contact the legalisation Office in the UK - they offer an excellent online service (the process is known as apostille)
2. Take the document to the Indonesian Embassy
3. Take it to the Ministry of Foreign Affairs in Jakarta

My plan is to use the online service and have a family member based in the UK take the certificate to the Embassy before returning it to me. I will then take it to Jakarta. I have emailed them to confirm if a family member is able to do this.

My question is, has anyone done this and can confirm that this procedure is that which is required as no-one seems to be have the knowledge or authority to confirm it at all.

Thanks in advance for anyone who made it through my post.

Do you need to write authorization letter before your family member can get your marriage cert legalized from the embassy?

In the uk it was / is an online application and you sent the documents to that particular office with an account number/ payment number that was issued after payment,
No authorisation is needed for such documents within the UK by UK citizens

No i didn't do that but had previous correspondence with the embassy who confirmed my parents would be able to act on my behalf. As such, perhaps it was on file.

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