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Moving to Egypt... but not so sure if I should - HELP!

My family and I are thinking of moving to Egypt from South Africa. I work for a multi-national company, and I have 2 kids (7 and 13). Obviously I have a million questions, but they key ones are:

1. How easy is it for a western, christian woman to adapt to life in Egypt?
2. Can one move pets to Egypt quite easily? Are there good kennel facilites in Cairo?
3. What about schools?

Appreciate any advice or feedback - thanks!

Rod

I think it is more than easy.
open society for tourist country.
International schools are covering most governerates and districts.
regarding pets, it is important to secure healthy certificates when arriving.
Contacting Egyptian Embassy will facilitate the matter.
Welcome in Egypt
IMIG

Maadi is a wonderful area to live in as an ex-pat.  There are many resources here, Churches, and community groups that would make it easier for a Christian western woman.  There are also many shops in Maadi that carry imported products.  That's not to say there will be no culture shock, but that also depends on the individual and how easily they adapt to changes.

As far as moving pets to Egypt.  It was much easier than I thought it would be.  I moved a 100 lb. Rottweiler from the US.  As long as all your paperwork is in order (shot records, microchip, USDA forms, etc.) there is no quarantine for animals arriving via Cairo Airport.  I was prepared for the worst upon arrival, but to my surprise, they just wheeled out the dog crate and dropped her off with me in the baggage claim area.  I had the dog before any of my luggage even came out!  I had all the paperwork in had anxious to show it to someone, but no one seemed interested.  I breezed right through customs with the dog on the huge luggage cart.  They seemed more concerned with what I had in my boxes than the huge dog in the crate.  There are many facilities that board dogs in Egypt although I have yet to use one.  I have used pet-sitting services however.

As far as schools, they can be a little expensive.  You can end up paying between $3,000 and $7,000 per year - per child depending on where you send them.  Keep in mind there may be waiting lists for some schools so you may have to apply at more than one.

I'm a Christian woman from the United States who has lived here for one year. I don't have children yet, and I adopted my pets (two cats) once I got here, so I can't say anything about the schools or bringing pets in. However, I can say that I love living here. I have faced a little sexual harassment, verbal only, which I find easy to ignore. However, I'm very careful in how I dress when I leave my flat. I always wear 3/4-length or longer sleeves and loose pants or a long loose skirt. I also don't make eye contact with men unless they're shopkeepers or taxi drivers with whom I am speaking. When I have made eye contact or worn shorter sleeves, the sexual comments tended to increase.

Cairo isn't for everyone. It's polluted, there's trash on the streets, traffic is horrendous, and it's very crowded and loud, at least downtown. It's quieter in Maadi. But I've found the people to be very friendly, especially if you dress appropriately and learn at least a little Arabic. (Most Egyptians speak to me in English, but they do smile really big when I reply in Arabic, and they are very encouraging about my ... limited, shall we say? ... Arabic abilities. Overall, I'm thrilled to be here.

Oh, and there are several churches in Maadi, plus a few women's groups: Maadi Women's Guild, Cairo Women's Association (in Zamalek), Cairo Petroleum Wives (but you don't have to be an oil wife to join), among others. CSA (Community Services Association, I think that stands for) offers a variety of classes and tours, a library, a gym ... I forget what all else. There are lots of resources to help you adjust to life here. The key is to come with a positive attitude, realizing that things will be different from how they were back home. You'll like some things, love some things, despise some things ... but that's all part of the adventure.

Kennels are available but quality varies a lot. you might be better off with a dog sitting arrangement.

Cairo is an easy, polite, well mannered and very safe place to live with your children.  Most expats live in Khatameyia, Maadi or downtown.

check out the CSA website for useful info

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