Any idea please

Hi everyone! I have a question please, anyone have experience or anyone knows if I need to translate my documents from english to german? My fiance needs my documents upon acquiring legal capacity.

Thanks in advance!

Cheers

Janice

There are many offices that can prepare certified translations anywhere in Germany. Google "beglaubigte Übersetzung Deutsch Englisch"!
If your fiance is German, he should already know all this and have no problem finding them.

Lafilipina :

Hi everyone! I have a question please, anyone have experience or anyone knows if I need to translate my documents from english to german? My fiance needs my documents upon acquiring legal capacity.

Thanks in advance!

Cheers

Janice

Hi Janice,

Yes, you need all legal documents to be translated. I recommend you send your Fiancé the documents and have them translated by an official translator („Dolmetscher“) here in Germany.

Usually, if someone goes to the Aliens Office to request for certain documents, they will specify which documents they need and what kind ( translated , notarized, etc.).

Your Fiancé needs to visit the Aliens Office. Second-guessing will only delay everything, if you don’t get the documents right. As a result, they could ask for more documents, if you don’t follow accurate procedures.

Kind regards,
B

BeZwe :

Hi Janice,

Yes, you need all legal documents to be translated. I recommend you send your Fiancé the documents and have them translated by an official translator („Dolmetscher“) here in Germany.

B

Correction: a "Dolmetscher" is strictly an oral translator (interpreter). Someone who does written translations is an "Übersetzer",  a written translation is an "Übersetzung", the verb to translate written word is übersetzen.

TominStuttgart :
BeZwe :

Hi Janice,

Yes, you need all legal documents to be translated. I recommend you send your Fiancé the documents and have them translated by an official translator („Dolmetscher“) here in Germany.

B

Correction: a "Dolmetscher" is strictly an oral translator (interpreter). Someone who does written translations is an "Übersetzer",  a written translation is an "Übersetzung", the verb to translate written word is übersetzen.

Hi TominStuttgart,

Perhaps, you can also conjugate the verb „Übersetzen“. Not entirely correct. Dolmetscher does NOT strictly do verbal translation. Übersetzter (written) does on the other hand. Dolmetscher „usually“ and „mostly“ do verbal translation, however not limited.

We had a Dolmetscher. He translated my documents and I am married now since years.

Kind regards,
B

BeZwe :
TominStuttgart :
BeZwe :

Hi Janice,

Yes, you need all legal documents to be translated. I recommend you send your Fiancé the documents and have them translated by an official translator („Dolmetscher“) here in Germany.

B

Correction: a "Dolmetscher" is strictly an oral translator (interpreter). Someone who does written translations is an "Übersetzer",  a written translation is an "Übersetzung", the verb to translate written word is übersetzen.

Hi TominStuttgart,

Perhaps, you can also conjugate the verb „Übersetzen“. Not entirely correct. Dolmetscher does NOT strictly do verbal translation. Übersetzter (written) does on the other hand. Dolmetscher „usually“ and „mostly“ do verbal translation, however not limited.

We had a Dolmetscher. He translated my documents and I am married now since years.

Kind regards,
B

No reason that someone who is an interpreter might not also be able to do translations. I just pointed out the meaning of the words - and  Dolmetscher means interpreter rather than translator. To tell a foreigner to look for a Dolmetscher rather than a Übersetzer for translations is misleading and wrong. And yes, übersetzen is a proper verb, this is entirely correct.

Hi

He has all my documents but he havent go to any office to check if I have the right documents. My birth certificate is a problem as it is partially unreadable.

What shall I do please.

Thank you

Do you have idea how much it cost?

Thank you

Sorry but such questions are almost laughable. For official documents then one does not look around for just anyone to translate documents; one needs to have CERTIFIED translations from a certified translator. And one simply has to ask since each such office will have their own rates – and the price will of course depend on the work involved; how difficult the translation is and how long. I think one can roughly expect to pay about 100 Euros a page. But your fiancé is German so he should just call around and find places that deal with the language involved (Tagalog?)  and get offers.

But having partially unreadable documents sounds very strange that might lead to problems. Instead of an old document, one should get a new one issued from whichever office is responsible. Having things unreadable is likely to lead officials to scrutinize or reject them. They don’t play games and the burden of proof in documenting is your responsibility.

If you need to have the documents translated in your country, the German embassy there can give you a list of certified translators.
For a list of translators in Germany, I think you can approach your embassy here - or Google
A damaged document will be rejected by any office (German or not). So get a new one issued by your home country's authorities first!

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