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Criteria for choosing Ecuador

This is by no means a comprehensive list of considerations that one should think about before moving to Ecuador or any new city/country but it’s a start to making one’s own criteria. Add any criteria you may have to this list which also includes subtopics. Criteria will absolutely vary depending on whether a person is seeking employment, retirement destination, adventure and so on. If you're wondering why some things are listed twice well because in one instance it could be cost of living relevant and in another instance availability. So, if someone for example wants a quality education for their kids, first they’ll have to see if it’s available, but despite availability it might be cost prohibitive and therefore not an option. There are many ways a person can use this list including pros and cons to compare to another city/country.

For example if I want to compare Quito with Guayaquil and weather was important to me, first I would allocate a certain value for weather for instance 25/100. After doing so then I would give a value 0-25 to each Quito and Guayaquil. Also you may also want to give a negative value for natural disasters.

Cost of Living
food
housing rental
clothing
restaurants
hotels
entertainment
resorts
cars
appliances
maid
private care
housing ownership
education
healthcare

Weather and Climate
preferred city
entire country

Transportation

Crime and Safety

People
language
culture
friendliness (socialization)
romance
expat community

Infrastructure
streets
electricity
telecommunications (internet)
water
hot water (Sophems)

Healthcare
insurance coverage
specialized care
hospitals and clinics

Natural Disasters
preferred city
entire country

Education
pre-tertiary
tertiary

Employment. Business and Volunteering
job opportunities
business opportunities
volunteering

Amenities and Entertainment
parks
malls
supermarkets
restaurants
community centers
nightlife
cafes
bookshops
cinema
theater
libraries
museums

Nature
beaches
mountains
resorts
jungle

Sports
participation
spectator

You are entirely over thinking the process.

You need to be flexible.

What is most important?

If you have kids, your first responsibility is their welfare- health, safety, education- otherwise choose a climate, fine tune from that.

No way you will pinpoint what or where you want to be quickly or assuredly. If you are uncomfortable with that concept then just come for a visit for a month. Longer would be very difficult for you.

It’s simply a list to help people think about what’s most important to them in comparing countries or cities. I agree that visiting a country/city is essential but most of us don’t have deep pockets to visit several countries. I think using this list should help narrow options.

One of the huge parts of moving to a foreign venue is stretching the envelope.

Placing yourself in an environment that is as unique as remains your level of comfort while allowing for new boundaries.

Or as my great Aunt Ida would say, how do  know if you don't try it?  I am surprised daily by self discovery and I first came to Ecuador in 2006

An oversight that could have been catastrophic was not giving a value to natural disasters. I'm alluding to last year's devastating earthquake. In retrospect had I put a value to that risk it would have avoided some repercussions. You had to have experienced it to understand the magnitude of such an earthquake. That's history and I'm finally at a point in which I think I have forgiven myself for that oversight.

If a newcomer wants to omit that value, especially for a person interested in the northern coast I have no issue with that. But I think it's something that people should consider especially those with families.

Another value which I didn't list is the affect that living in the Andes has had on my body. I've had some minor but stubborn fat around the belly that I couldn't get rid of despite numerous diets and exercise. I would get to a point and just plateau, and even tried to shock my body by cutting (fat loss), and bulking which would work initially but then plateau. I accepted it and thought it's part of age because our cells begin to decline after we are 30 or years old.

Living in the Andes has disproved that, and with no or minimal effort. That stubborn leftover fat around the belly has melted off. How much would I value that now, gosh it is so great to wear a fitted shirt comfortably without holding it in (belly). It's a great feeling and it's very humbling because it's something I worked tremendously hard to try to achieve, and also read that some people say it's temporary but so far so good.

I find the weight loss thing has more to do with Ecuador at least for me.

A few reasons I think: less access to a constant fast food diet I was eating, less access to hormonally induced to grow beef and poultry ( you eat it, you too grow fat), smaller portion sizes are normal, more activity, more fresh food. More fish in my diet

Vsimple,

Great post, and I totally agree with you.  As I have no children, except my 2 dogs, which let's face it live better than most Ecuadorians, the list continually changes and I've lived here for 4 years.  Vet care here is laughable, and my one dog suffers from IBD, and it's been a battle.  Due to import restrictions, heart worm testing is no longer available.  I live in manta, and survived the earthquake which was miserable.  I will admit I spent the whole earthquake holding up my big screen TV, which I brought here while experiencing the power go out and only hearing glass shatter through out my house.  The after shocks were even worse and I had no power for 3 days, and that includes running water.  Being from Florida, I would take a major hurricane any day over earthquakes.  I am still getting cracks in my walls and it's been almost a year.  I don't eat like Ecuadorians and my food bill each month is my biggest expense. And let's face it the beef here sucks ***, so I'm not eating in a luxery style.  I spend most of my time in the kitchen, making things just to make recipes.  We did our research, travelled to 4 countries and attended international living conferences.  I was a professional and being a stay at home mom/housekeeper was and still isn't in my anatomy.  As I have come to terms with my life, I still suffer from the meltdowns of not having the normal life I am accustomed to.  Those feelings come and go, but it's not always easy.  I have learned the hard way, not to trust the expat community, as my true friendships now do not include what my original friendships were when I moved here.  Entertainment and nightlife here in manta is also laughable.  It sucks and now with import taxes is too ridiculous to go out for a night of clubbing.  Safety?  I'm always aware and never comfortable of going out. That's one of my biggest adjustments as I am/was a trusting person but here always wonder if someone is trying to take advantage of me or harm me because I am a gringo.  In a perfect world I would move back to the US and resume my life, but for now it's not in the cards as we sold everything and shipped everything else here. You just have to make the best of it, but I am young according to expat standards and didn't just make the decision on a whim.  I made my husband move here for 3 months before I quit my job to relocate to make sure it was what he a wanted.  It has taken him 4 years to finally get to the point where he's very frustrated here.  Manana, the word I f'ng hate, is just the norm.  And it never ever means manana.  I don't live well with cold weather so manta is ideal for me as far as that goes.  Supplies and normal things are that I am used to are never the norm here, and I find my trips back to Miami are occurring more and more often.  If I could turn back time, I would have knixed my relationship and stayed in the US, and I love my husband very much or I wouldn't stay here.  But now, it's not feasible for me to walk away. So I have to manage.  I'm sure it would be different if I was older, but to any younger people considering the move, stay where you are.  You can decide based on a list of what you think are important, but with ever changing laws the list is continuously changing.  I'm not completely miserable as I wouldn't continue to live it, but there are times when it's not that easy.  I would now change my list and say hot water in my house would rank very high, but who knew people live without it.  I don't, but it cost my extra to have that luxury, and if he has subsidy changes may not be economical for us, and definitely a deal breaker if I stay or go.

"I am still getting cracks in my walls and it's been over a year."
           -- Sophems in Manta

--------

The above sentence alone is a cautionary lesson as to why Expats should not buy property in earthquake-prone areas of Ecuador, in particular the coastal region.

The 7.8 earthquake occurred 11 months ago, but one can imagine why it feels like much longer than that for those who survived it and the quake-aftershocks.

--------

Welcome back to the Ecuador forum, Sophems.  We were wondering about your absence.  Glad to know you have enough energy despite bronchitis to resume posting. :)

Next time around, pick a location more amenable to avoiding / recovering from bronchitis.

cccmedia

Sophems :

Vsimple,

Great post, and I totally agree with you.  As I have no children, except my 2 dogs, which let's face it live better than most Ecuadorians, the list continually changes and I've lived here for 4 years.  Vet care here is laughable, and my one dog suffers from IBD, and it's been a battle.  Due to import restrictions, heart worm testing is no longer available.  I live in manta, and survived the earthquake which was miserable.  I will admit I spent the whole earthquake holding up my big screen TV, which I brought here while experiencing the power go out and only hearing glass shatter through out my house.  The after shocks were even worse and I had no power for 3 days, and that includes running water.  Being from Florida, I would take a major hurricane any day over earthquakes.  I am still getting cracks in my walls and it's been almost a year.  I don't eat like Ecuadorians and my food bill each month is my biggest expense. And let's face it the beef here sucks ***, so I'm not eating in a luxery style.  I spend most of my time in the kitchen, making things just to make recipes.  We did our research, travelled to 4 countries and attended international living conferences.  I was a professional and being a stay at home mom/housekeeper was and still isn't in my anatomy.  As I have come to terms with my life, I still suffer from the meltdowns of not having the normal life I am accustomed to.  Those feelings come and go, but it's not always easy.  I have learned the hard way, not to trust the expat community, as my true friendships now do not include what my original friendships were when I moved here.  Entertainment and nightlife here in manta is also laughable.  It sucks and now with import taxes is too ridiculous to go out for a night of clubbing.  Safety?  I'm always aware and never comfortable of going out. That's one of my biggest adjustments as I am/was a trusting person but here always wonder if someone is trying to take advantage of me or harm me because I am a gringo.  In a perfect world I would move back to the US and resume my life, but for now it's not in the cards as we sold everything and shipped everything else here. You just have to make the best of it, but I am young according to expat standards and didn't just make the decision on a whim.  I made my husband move here for 3 months before I quit my job to relocate to make sure it was what he a wanted.  It has taken him 4 years to finally get to the point where he's very frustrated here.  Manana, the word I f'ng hate, is just the norm.  And it never ever means manana.  I don't live well with cold weather so manta is ideal for me as far as that goes.  Supplies and normal things are that I am used to are never the norm here, and I find my trips back to Miami are occurring more and more often.  If I could turn back time, I would have knixed my relationship and stayed in the US, and I love my husband very much or I wouldn't stay here.  But now, it's not feasible for me to walk away. So I have to manage.  I'm sure it would be different if I was older, but to any younger people considering the move, stay where you are.  You can decide based on a list of what you think are important, but with ever changing laws the list is continuously changing.  I'm not completely miserable as I wouldn't continue to live it, but there are times when it's not that easy.  I would now change my list and say hot water in my house would rank very high, but who knew people live without it.  I don't, but it cost my extra to have that luxury, and if he has subsidy changes may not be economical for us, and definitely a deal breaker if I stay or go.

Thank you Sophems and btw I love reading your posts. I will add the hot water to the list and acknowledge your contribution, and by the way I can relate to the importance of it for women and maybe for some men too for all I know. When my wife is here I’m on hot water alert because one bath can knock out hot water for the entire day. To elaborate we have an electric water tank and it only holds a certain amount of hot water but obviously not enough. What I do to offset the depletion of the hot water is to boil pots of water for her bath. This has definitely helped.

Like you I also don’t trust expats. It’s too much drama with them. A lot of them need to seriously get a life. This is why I love Ecuadorians because they have a life and don’t have time for gossip or other unnecessary nonsense. But to be fair I know Ecuadorians also have drama in their individual circles but as long I’m not involved I’m fine with that.

I think we have to be real with ourselves, and for some people the coast works and others the countryside. But personally I couldn’t live being deprived from who I am and this is why I think I’m thriving here because I need this infrastructure, I need the cafes, the  restaurants, pubs, and definitely the city people who are absolutely wonderful. I need that stimulation, that interaction with city people who come from all walks of life. Hell for me is being stuck in a town in which all the people have the same mentality. This, along with weather is my main criteria.

Accessibility of visas.   Besides Ecuador, which desirable destination has an investor's visa of $25,000?  I heard from an expat in Armenia Colombia, a region where "It is estimated that a large earthquake, approximately 6-7 in magnitude, will hit this area every 20 years due to high seismic activity" that there may be a $25,000 option, but I remain skeptical.

Nards Barley :

Accessibility of visas....      I remain skeptical (about $25,000 visas):..

Contact this email address... info(at)farmedellin.oom .. and visit farinternational.com

FAR is the new name of First American Realty Medellin.

Dear FAR,

I would like to know more about your investment offerings that would qualify an Expat to obtain a Colombia visa for $25,000 or less.

Respectfully yours,
Nards Barley

Senor CC......how are the prices for living there.  And availability of American foods and things difficult (or extremely expensive) to find in Ecuador?

I think one of the big take always: attended International Living conferences. On another site where I moderate we call this company International Lying. They do.

I come from a more Bohemian and basic life style. I don't have hot water, I don't have a big screen TV (or any for decades) and my dogs eat dog food (or cat food because the bowls are next too each other and who doesn't love variety?)

My expectations are much lower, my needs much more basic. WiFi, a roof that doesn't leak, water, doors that lock, windows that open and close, electric. And ocean. BTW I just turned 55, have been here 8+ years and I work now in animal rescue and online as a researcher.

My chief criteria for choosing Ecuador? 12/12 ...equal hours of day and night throughout the year. The ultimate treatment of Seasonal Affective Disorder, a major trigger to a serious chronic illness I have dealt with my entire life.

Also, I have been literally attacked by fellow expats. At one time a hate page on Facebook me because I "knew too much" and labelled me a "Jewish Nazi" and claimed I was faking my illness, among other things. I was actually banned from attending functions in Salinas and made to leave a local bar (which subsequently was shut down for repeated underage drinking violations years later). I persisted. The attackers? Most left, some died, some are incarcerated here in Ecuador. Some still live here spewing their nastiness.

It has not always been easy, but Ecuador was the right move for me.

Susan_in_Ecuador :

I think one of the big take always: attended International Living conferences. On another site where I moderate we call this company International Lying. They do.

Think that the majority here call IL the same thing.

I'm not surprised...

It was going to catch on ;-)

One about: The most dangerous thing you'll meet in Ecuador is a gringo with a business card.


Ecuador is the smallest town you'll ever live in ...

...there's a few others of mine that have become part of the vernacular...

But Ecuatastrophe... That's Margarets

So is: How do you make a small fortune in Ecuador? You arrive with a large one.

Straight up and honest.

And IL ... Yeah, you might want Google [Pirate SEC International Living] for some not too ancient history on that publishing group and some of its illustrious and more interesting history. It's publicized in court records and recognized business publications online. Also you may be able to find a link to a post by an actual IL editor (aka writer) in which the "mindset" of IL writing is explained: Google [ International Living Modern Bride Nick Crowder]

You already know that  the internet should not be the only tool you use for researching your move, now you know it is a great tool to research your OTHER tools too. Check out who it is that's giving you your information. As you discovered, not every professional, is one.

Susan_in_Ecuador :

How do you make a small fortune in Ecuador? You arrive with a large one.

That one's about Vegas, baby. :cool:

No casinos in Ecuador since 2012.  Could that change after El Supremo doffs his big sombrero next month? :/

cccmedia

Ha! Good point... You gambling man   :one

Susan,

I was shocked to hear about the expat community espousing nasty things about you.  I have purchased land near olon.  I have heard this from the ecuadorian woman I bought the land from.  She has been subject to the nastiness as well.  I am still in the states but will be very weary of the friendships in ecuador that are from the USA.  She has made me well aware of this and now that you are writing about it I too am like you, bohemian in my ways and accepting of others any flavor or color. 

Thank  you,

ruth

Hi everyone, I've enjoyed reading all these posts and I've been taking a back seat. Why Ecuador is a great topic. To some it means a place to escape the political problems back in the USA, to some it is a way to live the simpler life and to some it is just another stop on their tour of the world. There are many reasons for "Why Ecuador". For me, I've been traveling the world via my computer fingers by looking for a place to spend my retirement. Yes I have been spoiled by living the good life here in Connecticut but I've had it with the winter weather, the cost of living and the political environment. I want my retirement dollars to last me a long time yet I don't want to give up the amenities that life has to offer that I've been accustomed to such as those in Connecticut. I may not be the typical expat that most of you are familiar with however, there may be a new wave of us looking to maintain the 'good life' that we can't necessarily afford back home. No, I am not an 'upper class snob'  but I am simply a middle-class Joe looking to live a life of luxury  (that I never was able to afford) at a relatively reasonable price. After much research I came upon a sustainable community development that had me intrigued, it's name is "Las Olas". It is on the coast a few miles south of Bahia de Caraquez and has been a 'slow moving project' for the last few years. The last few years has basically been devoted to 'moving a mountain' and terracing the land so all homes built there will have a perfect view. It is a very 'caring' project that has taken time to develope by some very 'sincere' people 9the developers). It offers either building lots for single family homes or condominiums on 1650 acres of the most beautiful land I have ever seen. Using Hormi2 building methods that are designed to withstand earthquakes and other natural disasters which are most important when choosing to live on the shoreline. The homes will also have solar panels on each roof for 'hot water' heating etc.  best of all, these homes and condo's are very reasonably priced in today's marketplace. The amenities include; beach club, championship golf course, equestrian center, tennis & pickleball center, on site restaurants, 650 acres of natural hiking trails, healthcare facility and plans to build a marketplace village just outside its gates as well as a marina. Sure, this isn't for everyone but it sure fits my bill. Take a look on line for more information. The project is moving along now with much progress as 3 homes are near completion.
Why Ecuador? I just wanted to introduce a 'different' alternative of living for those who may be interested, like I said, it may not be for everybody but it will be a 'familiar new home away from home' for me. It will be a community of people who care about sustainability and fun lifestyle as well. Check it out!

Las Olas has been discussed for many years now.  You can find hundreds of posts about it on this forum by searching.

The only thing I will say is to repeat what has been attributed to Mark Twain, "It’s easier to fool people than to convince them that they have been fooled."  OK and also, "Caveat emptor".

Dear Petere,

Buying pre-construction real estate in South America is a gamble not stacked in the buyer's favor.

The fact that three homes at Las Olas are near completion gives one no idea at all as to when your home would be ready for occupancy.

If you fall in love with Las Olas, wait to buy until an existing home comes up for re-sale.

Yes, it may cost more than buying pig-in-a-poke pre-construction.

However, peace of mind is priceless .. and you are unlikely to get that when buying in pre-construction.

cccmedia

OsageArcher :

Las Olas has been discussed for many years now....

"It’s easier to fool people than to convince them that they have been fooled."  OK and also, "Caveat emptor".

I have just read your post on the New Members thread, Petere, so I now know that you have already bought a building lot at Las Olas.

Do you have a contract with Las Olas promising to complete your home by a date certain?

If not, years of patience will probably be required.

Even if you have a contractual promise, lotsa luck getting the home delivered for occupancy on time .. or collecting on the multa that you would supposedly be paid for delayed construction.

cccmedia

cccmedia :

Yes, it may cost more than buying pig-in-a-poke pre-construction.

cccmedia

The idioms pig in a poke and sell a pup (or buy a pup) refer to a confidence trick originating in the Late Middle Ages, when meat was scarce, but cats and dogs were not.[1][2][3] The idiom pig in a poke can also simply refer to someone buying a low-quality pig in a bag because he or she did not carefully check what was in the bag.[4]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pig_in_a_poke

Nards Barley :
cccmedia :

Yes, it may cost more than buying pig-in-a-poke pre-construction.

cccmedia

The idioms pig in a poke and sell a pup (or buy a pup) refer to a confidence trick originating in the Late Middle Ages, when meat was scarce, but cats and dogs were not.[1][2][3] The idiom pig in a poke can also simply refer to someone buying a low-quality pig in a bag because he or she did not carefully check what was in the bag.[4]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pig_in_a_poke

And the at least near-equivalent in Spanish, meaning to trick someone or bait-and-switch,
Dar gato por liebre  To give a cat for (instead of) a hare

Pensé que compré tenis de Nike, pero me dieron gato por liebre, son basura de China.
I thought I bought Nike tennis shoes, but they tricked me, they're garbage from China.

Tough crowd! I'm really not worried. The developers are on the up and up. I've done my investigating. The timing of 2-3 years is fine for my plan. ¡Qué será, será!

Petere52 :

¡Qué será, será!

Perfect español, with the correct exclamation points and accent marks, no less :top: .. expressing an attitude that can get one far in Ecuador. :)

Good luck with your home at Las Olas.

cccmedia

Not so much a tough crowd......as mentioned earlier, this has been discussed at length.
I will not repeat what has been said but it is well worth reading the entire threads of Las Olas before sinking any money into construction.......

xxxx
Here is the story of what is really happening at this sustainable living development of Las Olas:
  It took a few years to virtually 'move' a mountain, clear the land and terrace the land properly so everyone will have a beautiful view. This took much engineering skill and a lot of hard work to move over 60,000 truckfulls of earth. The first 3 homes have been built and the crew has now been trained how to build a home to North American standards as well as surpass the Hormi2 standards required to make a dwelling somewhat earthquake safe. Each home has several piers that have been drilled 12 meters into the earth to anchor the dwellings (not really required but an extra safety measure none the less). The golf course is near completion and will be of such championship quality that Ecuador has not seen as of yet.  Equestrian shelters have been built and the horses have been brought in already. In other words, the developers have sunk a lot of money into this project (mind you it is debt free and out of their own pockets) and it would not be to their benefit to pull out! 
I have bought my lot and I am aware it will not be built immediately but I am sure that I have made the right decision. So please, before you judge, why not visit the site or even go on-line and view the progress. This will truly be a one-of-a-kind community development which has never been seen in Ecuador. Once again, a new way of living that may not be for everyone but well worth the wait for me.

Moderated by Bhavna 4 months ago
Reason : Please provide information on your personal experience only.
We invite you to read the forum code of conduct
Petere52 :

Hi everyone, I've enjoyed reading all these posts and I've been taking a back seat. Why Ecuador is a great topic. To some it means a place to escape the political problems back in the USA, to some it is a way to live the simpler life and to some it is just another stop on their tour of the world. There are many reasons for "Why Ecuador". For me, I've been traveling the world via my computer fingers by looking for a place to spend my retirement. Yes I have been spoiled by living the good life here in Connecticut but I've had it with the winter weather, the cost of living and the political environment. I want my retirement dollars to last me a long time yet I don't want to give up the amenities that life has to offer that I've been accustomed to such as those in Connecticut. I may not be the typical expat that most of you are familiar with however, there may be a new wave of us looking to maintain the 'good life' that we can't necessarily afford back home. No, I am not an 'upper class snob'  but I am simply a middle-class Joe looking to live a life of luxury  (that I never was able to afford) at a relatively reasonable price. After much research I came upon a sustainable community development that had me intrigued, it's name is "Las Olas". It is on the coast a few miles south of Bahia de Caraquez and has been a 'slow moving project' for the last few years. The last few years has basically been devoted to 'moving a mountain' and terracing the land so all homes built there will have a perfect view. It is a very 'caring' project that has taken time to develope by some very 'sincere' people 9the developers). It offers either building lots for single family homes or condominiums on 1650 acres of the most beautiful land I have ever seen. Using Hormi2 building methods that are designed to withstand earthquakes and other natural disasters which are most important when choosing to live on the shoreline. The homes will also have solar panels on each roof for 'hot water' heating etc.  best of all, these homes and condo's are very reasonably priced in today's marketplace. The amenities include; beach club, championship golf course, equestrian center, tennis & pickleball center, on site restaurants, 650 acres of natural hiking trails, healthcare facility and plans to build a marketplace village just outside its gates as well as a marina. Sure, this isn't for everyone but it sure fits my bill. Take a look on line for more information. The project is moving along now with much progress as 3 homes are near completion.
Why Ecuador? I just wanted to introduce a 'different' alternative of living for those who may be interested, like I said, it may not be for everybody but it will be a 'familiar new home away from home' for me. It will be a community of people who care about sustainability and fun lifestyle as well. Check it out!

Alright this is yet another criteria and it’s a good one because it further dispels the misconception of Ecuador solely being a cheap place, an oxymoron of some sort (Ecuador + Luxury). Yes there's luxury here, yes there are million+ dollar homes.

Most certainly there is luxury here in Ecuador.........in ways most Americans do not know......
Unfortunately it is for the very few..........
As for Las Olas...........I wish him luck, this project seems very uncertain and has not lived up to it's stated and frequently changing objectives.......

Do they have a water or electric source yet?

What’s also important is to make people realize that many products that a middle class person can purchase outside of Ecuador are borderline luxury items here. In essence middle class people are relegated to being window shoppers for many quality products.

The past few months as I mentioned in the Climate Thread we experienced a tremendous amount of rainfall and my shoes were taking in water, so I decided to go to a North Face shop at mall el jardín to buy a pair that were waterproof. The cost was $250, and for the same kind I could get on Amazon for $120 or even $96 on Moosejaw with a coupon. A remedy for that is to get a pair when traveling aboard. But there are items where that is not even possible like telescopes because they weigh so much and will use almost all of the allowable weight for one bag.

Some people will say well I don’t need that stuff, and to that I say good for you, but that’s you and is not reflective of the reality of cost of living here. I enjoy astronomy and want to see the rings of Saturn, as high up in the Andes is a magnificent vantage point.

My point here is if one's criteria is to maintain their quality of life it can be costly because life here is more than just about 3 small humitas for $1. Yeah it’s funny how the cheapest of cheapest items are often quoted, but the price of a decent glass of wine in a nice restaurant is never mentioned.

As for Las Olas, it’s been discussed so much on other dedicated threads and there’s no reason to spread that contention to other threads.

Alright it's been 5 months since this thread started and this is where I stand and it will naturally fluctuate with time.

35% People
30% Weather
35% Everything else

My logic is very simple, I won't be able to enjoy the 35% (Everything else) if the people are not to my liking and the weather is not great.

What I'm saying is that Ecuadorians are good people and Ecuador has beautiful weather.

As for cost of living, and why I left it out, I'll save that for another day, but living here is not as cheap as people make it out to be. A simple point if a Quito resident were to go hiking to say Mindo, how much would it cost? And using public transport? At least $60-$75 for a few hours unless you go there and do nothing, and pack your own lunch.

Ecuador is not cheap anymore and some of the prices you will pay in Ecuador are more expensive in Ecuador the in your own country or some of the countries. Such as electric, cars just few I notice

Aw please............thats way old......."how do you make a small fortune in Ecuador? Arrive with a large one"  We were using that 27 yrs ago in Costa Rica.......I really dont think you invented it Susan.....Sorry.........

pol_can :

Ecuador is not cheap anymore and some of the prices you will pay in Ecuador are more expensive in Ecuador the in your own country or some of the countries. Such as electric, cars just few I notice

The electric is a good example of cost of living because some people will say well my electric bill is only $14 of whatever. And that’s good for them BUT what is the price per kilowatt? Furthermore what is the rate being compared to? That would be an objective way to determine electricity costs because not everyone has the same consumption.

There are somethings that are however cheaper so that has to be weighed in, but I think in this day and age the cost of living variance between developing countries will continue to lessen as they develop.  So I think it’s important to choose a country in which the potential to be happy is real. A person can live in a cheaper country but if the desire is to live in Ecuador then their happiness can be affected. This fact or surpressing authentic desires can lead to unhappiness is documented.

I would imagine that the cost of elect in Ecuador varies greatly as it does in most if not all of these latin countries....For example here in Panama, the cost per kilowatt hour is approx double what the average is in the U.S. (not including Hawaii)  but there are so many subsidies here that it ends up being cheap......I pay around $16 per month........but if you run a business in the city, you will be paying bigtime.......thats where they get it........I dont know about Ecuador, but I do know that most of the energy comes from hydro power and the cost per kwh is cheap.........but maybe the system punishes you there too for trying to run a business........will be interested to hear from someone who knows better about that one...........

AMDG :

Most certainly there is luxury here in Ecuador.........in ways most Americans do not know......
Unfortunately it is for the very few..........
As for Las Olas...........I wish him luck, this project seems very uncertain and has not lived up to it's stated and frequently changing objectives.......

Do they have a water or electric source yet?

Pretty basic infrastructure....also i'd add sewer system

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