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Dealing with homesickness in Canada

Hello everyone,

Being an expat in Canada can turn out to be a wonderful human, social or professional adventure... with potential moments of nostalgia and homesickness along the way.

What are your personal tips to prevent homesickness?

How do you deal with such feelings?

Are there shops or stores offering products from your home country in Canada? Or maybe venues with music and ambiance from your homeland?

Thanks for sharing your experience,

Priscilla

Hi Priscilla, there are lots of stores offering British fare these days I live in red deer Alberta and the Wal mart here. As I am sure in all locations, across Canada at least, have a British section in fact they also have a French and a German section. Amusingly they are all separated by one aisle, which makes me wonder if the instigator of these sections Had a sense of humour. I am told there is a huge store in Calgary called the Scottish store I am not sure,  of it's name, but it is a veritable feast of wares from candies to crisps to mowbrays pork pies and pasties.... Yummmmm?

Nostalgia is like sunburn: that's not bad during the day ...but at night it hurts.                                                   there has not, as far as i knew , a cure for nostalgia.

Part of integrating is making new memories. You can make friends, participate in activities that bring you happiness or peace. Homesickness is a feeling that will stay even if you are happy in your country of residence. But remember why you left in the first place and keep in touch with your gang back abroad .

I can only speak for Toronto. This city breeds diversity from people, customs, communities to food so you'll always have something from your home country e. g. Korean Town, Little India, Corso Italia etc. However, you'll always miss home so my advise is self care. Take your time to adapt, mentally,  physically and emotionally. It is important to pay attention to yourself. I live here without any safety net at all and it's rough and a struggle. Check my page on Facebook, see if it helps: facebook.com/My-WRAP-Movement-Mindful-Bullet-Journalling-188353748251213/

Oh well let me take a swipe at this.

If you're living in a large city the likes of Toronto / GTA, Vancouver, Calgary, or Montreal for example, you can be rest assured that there's probably a neighborhood that would most likely embody your cultural background somewhat. Besides, these cities are diverse and have large influx of immigrants. Even the average super stores carry your Asian, Caribbean,  Mexican, Italian etc fares - knowing that they want to include all demographics that'll frequent their stores. Then there are countless of restaurants too and one for every types of culture known. So yes, you can never go wrong by heading to a major city if loneliness and homesickness seems to be a constant affliction.

If you're in a smaller city like myself, then you'd ought to put up with what you've got. Making new friends, accepting this new paradigm and changing your mindset helps.

If all fails, you can always pick up the phone or smart phone and skype / facetime the other side. Last of all, buy a ticket and head back home for a short visit.

I am interesting writing you to help me to work and live in Canada iam received two promotions work in Canada agricultural company , promise to schedule interview after documents submitted . Ask him how interview process and no response.                  What I don' now?                                                   You need comment on your topic I live in Egypt             thank you and best regards                                                          ibra55

Well in one phrase: changing country, it's like changing spouse, or husband, most end up having nostalgia of both...

i didn't understand well what you mean exactly.??
i assume you are using a machine translation tool, you can write to me in Arabic.

I am trying hard to adjust... it has been nearly 2 months away from home but i miss home everyday :(

There are friends, wives, fathers and brothers only (almost) in the homeland. The exiled is everywhere alone. However, Real and objective  happiness comes  mostly from  misfortune. ..                                                                                                                                                                   In brief:  exile is mortal....But paradoxically as it may seem, it's also a way to achieve immortality,                                                               if you  survive to it..

If you are new comer, you must live in bigger cities unless someone is living in smaller community is very close to you. Canada is the best for those who can work hard and can make their way. Stay positive and work hard you will soon get the reward.

I make sure I talk with my family at least once a week using a video calling service (Skype, FaceTime or the like). I have a small close group of friends and keep myself busy. I joined a sport team which has helped me a lot to build community and a sense of belonging. I meet with me friends regularly and the ones that are far I call over the phone. I stay updated with what's happening with everyone through Facebook and WhatsApp. Sometimes you just feel lonely but then I remember why I've made the choices I've made. I want to be and grow roots in Canada. I've sacrificed a lot to be here (being away from family, starting over, etc), and it was a choice I made with the certainty it is the best for me.

The best way to keep away the sadness is to go out, enjoy your surroundings and see the world through a child's eyes. Be curious, let yourself be impressed by the beauty and diversity, and live in the present moment. Make your life the best it can be at this moment. Take one day at a time. Join a team or take a class, and meet new like-minded people.

I've only met 3 people from my country in Canada, rarely speak with them and there are no places that are from my country home...nonetheless, from time to time there is a song from a Puertorrican artist on the radio and there are latin restaurants I enjoy going to from time to time to get a little taste of Latin America.

Trying to find people from your own country or even areas of the town or city that have a lot of expats from your part of the world tend to remind you that you're no longer living in your homeland and exacerbate feelings of homesickness. Here are a few suggestions that might help you.
1. Homesickness is usually closely tied to feelings of isolation and depression. Try to get involved in activities you enjoy and where you can actually talk to people face to face (phones and the Internet aren't a good substitute for a live body).
2. In Canada, with the long cold winters and, in some places, lack of sun, it's easy to become depressed and think that life was so much better in your own country - maybe it was but you're here and need to cope with reality. Eating well is extremely important. Even if you live alone and don't have a lot of money, stay away from fast food and junk food. If you're not out in the sun much, keep up with a Vitamin D supplement.
3. Be aware of what seems to trigger feelings of homesickness and be ready to get past them (see 1.)
4. Do not hang out with other people who are homesick. Maybe misery does love company but this won't ,make you less unhappy. Find upbeat people and enjoyable activities to spend you time on
5. When you contact your family and friends back home, don't indulge in a  "phone and moan". - you'll only feel worse and so will they. Try writing or emailing  and have a good look at what you're saying before you send it: you're a  lot less likely to feed your feelings of homesickness in writing than orally.
6. At some point, you will probably take a trip back home and will find that it isn't how you remember it. Things change and so do you. The reasons why you left may well be even more apparent.

Above all, look on your time in Canada as an adventure and an opportunity to learn and to explore a different country. Remember that nothing lasts forever.

Hello!!

The easiest thing for me to deal with homesickness is by eating my traditional food. I did it a lot, I ended up having my own recipe blog. At first it serves as my virtual notebook of my traditional recipes but lately it has developed as one of my hobbies. Having a lot of hobbies also occupy my mind and reduce my homesickness.

Do you have new hobbies that you developed on your new country of residence?

kirriemuir :

Trying to find people from your own country or even areas of the town or city that have a lot of expats from your part of the world tend to remind you that you're no longer living in your homeland and exacerbate feelings of homesickness. Here are a few suggestions that might help you.
1. Homesickness is usually closely tied to feelings of isolation and depression. Try to get involved in activities you enjoy and where you can actually talk to people face to face (phones and the Internet aren't a good substitute for a live body).
2. In Canada, with the long cold winters and, in some places, lack of sun, it's easy to become depressed and think that life was so much better in your own country - maybe it was but you're here and need to cope with reality. Eating well is extremely important. Even if you live alone and don't have a lot of money, stay away from fast food and junk food. If you're not out in the sun much, keep up with a Vitamin D supplement.
3. Be aware of what seems to trigger feelings of homesickness and be ready to get past them (see 1.)
4. Do not hang out with other people who are homesick. Maybe misery does love company but this won't ,make you less unhappy. Find upbeat people and enjoyable activities to spend you time on
5. When you contact your family and friends back home, don't indulge in a  "phone and moan". - you'll only feel worse and so will they. Try writing or emailing  and have a good look at what you're saying before you send it: you're a  lot less likely to feed your feelings of homesickness in writing than orally.
6. At some point, you will probably take a trip back home and will find that it isn't how you remember it. Things change and so do you. The reasons why you left may well be even more apparent.

Above all, look on your time in Canada as an adventure and an opportunity to learn and to explore a different country. Remember that nothing lasts forever.

Well said...

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