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In retrospect, would you move again to Ghana?

Hi all,

If you had to look back on your expat experience in Ghana, would you heartily say "let’s do it again"?

From the preparation stage to your actual everyday life in your new country, what did you enjoy the most?

Would you do certain things differently? Could you tell us why?

How would you describe the benefits of your expatriation in Ghana so far?

Thank you in advance for sharing your experience. We look forward to hearing from you!

Christine

Ghana is a good country but for a expat it is also a very expensive country if you have foreign currency coming into your bank account every month you can have a comfortable life but if not its not a place for people who are earning peanuts

Married a  Ghana lady, have a small business, is ok.
If you can get past the driving and the ignorence of most of the people
you'll be fine!

From my experience, I would never do it again
I went to Ghana with my son and his family.
I expected to have hardships, but never to the extent that we experienced.
I had 3 cameras stolen plus my laptop. The police are not at all helpful.
In addition, there are so many blackouts of power, so you must have a powerful generator in order to have a/c and refrigeration.
In addition, the cost of living is extremely high.
My son's company paid the rent which was unbelievable.  But, additionally the cost is food was very high.
Again, in retrospect, I would never do it again.  My son's wife stayed 10 months and then left.  The quality of the air was unsuitable for a young child and she developed asthma. So it was a really bad experience!
Sorry to be negative but this is the truth as I experienced it.

I am so sorry that your experience was not positive. I retired to Ghana 6 years ago but I was fully aware of what conditions were like as I had previously lived here as a volunteer in the 1990s. My husband made sure that we had back up water and electricity which are essential. Yes, Ghana is expensive but again I was used to Ghanaian food so could limit the amount of expensive imported food.
Before coming to Ghana it is important to do your homework and find out what your living situation is going to be and if it will allow you to have the lifestyle you want or it will be difficult.
I don't know whether I have just been lucky but I have had nothing stolen but know that the economic situation is very difficult for expats and locals alike and robbery is becoming more common but even so I still feel safe here and have no desire to leave.

There is truth in everyone's comment, incidentally I am a native of Accra, born and bred, when I was growing up in Accra the population of the country was about 8 million and surging, I doubt that Accra was over a million. Life was pleasant, clean disciplined respectful. Most of the locals spoke GA, the language of the indigenous Accra inhabitants.  But English was abundantly spoken on radio and TV. Simply put, life was beautiful and Ghanaians had a sense of dignity appreciated worldwide, even our educational system was the envy of the continent. Today, Ghana is in shambles and nobody can deceive me or water down my sentiments. Those of us who can afford to escape the everyday drudgery would find something nice to say occasionally, because, yes amid the chaos, there is a lot of funfair and easy come easy go money around. I have relocated to my land of birth Accra as a matter of choice, poised to confront the madness, not because I like it. I recognize that my life expectancy will diminish. When I was growing up in Accra, we used to hail taxis. Today they hunt you down, honk you up...too many awful things people have turned into a culture. To conclude and leave everyone to their own opinion...I'd say "I love Ghana, but I hate what it has become". I can live in isolation and lavishly, but what good is that gonna do me like a segregationist? Face facts, speak the truth about the decay so we can fix this dysfunction. Don't wade into the foolishness so you can be accepted, when you can discern right from wrong. I have seen a few expatriates doing things roman's do when in Ghana.

Well, in retrospective we would never do it again. Ghana has changed because Ghana's Government does a poor job. The only hope is that the opposition gets in power December 2016. We have blackouts over years,daily. Everything is expensive now. It doesn't matter if it's local food or imported stuff. Because the cedi is inflating. The economy has a tough time and the people in power are corrupting the money and avoid to help the firm's and factories during this hard times with intelligent policies. It will take a long time to return this country to his old good class.

Ghana is the second  most expensive country in Africa first one is Angola. with these inflated prices you dont get value for your money. shoprite is one of the cheapest shops in the other African countries where even people with low income can buy their food,  but in Ghana YOU PAY 4 TIMES MORE FOR THE SAME PRODUCTS. and if you look for quality beef and lamb meat you cannot find it. the only thing reasonably priced is the cloth.with the low wages I am wondering how the people are surviving.

I totally agree with you.  In addition the cost of housing is unbelievable.  I don't know how the Ghanians can afford a place to live!

That is very true and that is the reason the country is very corrupt.
Our salaries are just hand-to-mouth, for rent, transportation back and forth to work.
You can not have any development on your own unless you become corrupt on your duty to earn extra.

gangan2 :

Ghana is the second  most expensive country in Africa first one is Angola. with these inflated prices you dont get value for your money. shoprite is one of the cheapest shops in the other African countries where even people with low income can buy their food,  but in Ghana YOU PAY 4 TIMES MORE FOR THE SAME PRODUCTS. and if you look for quality beef and lamb meat you cannot find it. the only thing reasonably priced is the cloth.with the low wages I am wondering how the people are surviving.

I find the costs of living in Ghana relatively high and still climbing. I have been in Ghana since 1990 and have continued living there until recently. Nevertheless, I am still able to manage as I am used to the local food and rightly so, I do not need to rely on the imported stuff.

On a different note, Angola is not an expensive country. It's just so happen that Luanda is ranked the most expensive CITY globally.

Yes, in retrospect, I will want to continue staying in Ghana. Despite the fact that I am back in Singapore for the meantime, our matrimonial home and others are still intact in Ghana. I missed Ghana so much that I came back for a month of complete rest and idleness between June and July. The fufu, the banku .... have never tasted so good and mind you, it's not always true that the grass over yonder is greener. Lol

I lived in Ghana 5 years and started some small business. The business is still running but without any profit. 2010 to 2013 were good years, in 2014 turnover dropped by 50% and in 2015 another 30%. I went from 4000 dollar to 1000 dollar income. So i decided to stop and try a different country. Its very sad, because Ghana used to be a good place.

Been there.  I tested the waters for a few years.  I was back and forth.  I never fully moved there but I saw that if you have a business it is never stable.  You essentially have to have income from abroad to keep it going.  I would suggest Ghana for a young person who is ready for adventure and does not have family responsibility but if you are an older person with a family you better be employed by a multinational company or NGO.

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