Good that most of income capital or income (if any) are in none HUF

A lot of news on inflation in Hungary, a bit worrying, whereas if captial (and possible income) of readers is largely like to be in USD or EUR still the annual wage increases I think is starting to hit us a bit. Still I am very very worried on the situation on the topic of inflation (also I have to say EUR and USD).

Our capital disappears in thin air and in a my biggest fear is that the (limited) capital in 10 years time will be at least 50% less than before. (side note I do not have any income)
It is good that propertyy so far has proven to be a protection (and I hope this will continue to be our new location).
Inflation obviously is a major topic in Turkey as well (even more so), but I hope that dependency of tourism will even increase. (will prices of EUR of properties (we will see))
Classify me as crazy or other but cashing in a bit and wishing for more.

Bottom line Hungary is TOO getting expensive for me.

I have had a Hungarian job for 7 years and so did my wife, I am very very curious what will come from our pension. (I have to say Luxembourg was best, provided you work more then 10 years, you make your contribution, your employer doubles and so does the government, not only for yourself but also for 90% for spouse if you were to die (catholic country)
Excellent (of course something to be exepected from Netherlands and UK, but honestly limited)

Still inflation can hit us all heavily.

cdw057 wrote:

A lot of news on inflation in Hungary, a bit worrying, whereas if captial (and possible income) of readers is largely like to be in USD or EUR still the annual wage increases I think is starting to hit us a bit. Still I am very very worried on the situation on the topic of inflation (also I have to say EUR and USD).

Our capital disappears in thin air and in a my biggest fear is that the (limited) capital in 10 years time will be at least 50% less than before. (side note I do not have any income)
It is good that propertyy so far has proven to be a protection (and I hope this will continue to be our new location).
Inflation obviously is a major topic in Turkey as well (even more so), but I hope that dependency of tourism will even increase. (will prices of EUR of properties (we will see))
Classify me as crazy or other but cashing in a bit and wishing for more.

Bottom line Hungary is TOO getting expensive for me.

I have had a Hungarian job for 7 years and so did my wife, I am very very curious what will come from our pension. (I have to say Luxembourg was best, provided you work more then 10 years, you make your contribution, your employer doubles and so does the government, not only for yourself but also for 90% for spouse if you were to die (catholic country)
Excellent (of course something to be exepected from Netherlands and UK, but honestly limited)

Still inflation can hit us all heavily.

We don't worry about inflation too much.
Of course no one wants to pay more and get less.
We have more then we need, worked and saved all of our lives. In fact we live way below what we can afford.
Just an old,"Hippie" habit of ours.
We have been "middle class" in income and there have been times here and there when we asked my mother to borrow funds.She NEVER gave us a loan however so we learned to deal with going without.
That's life, up and down.
For many years my husband in Ca. would cash his weekly pay check after work inside the bank.He was still in his diry machinist work clothing. They would say hello Mr. T and have him step into the VIP lane to be serviced by a clerk. Always so happy to see him.
When the economy went bust and he closed his shop, he went into the same bank wearing a nice suit and tie but they wouldn't even give him the time of day without a income.
That's life, have to learn to fend for yourself because no one is there to help when you really need help.
Guess that's why we are so frugal we are on our own, always have been.
When you get older you realize what a waste of life working was. working for somene else at least.
Even when we could afford brand new cars, we always bought used and looked for a deal even if we had to fix something on the car.

I had a weakness for fine clothing and other items but somehow they don't seem very important to me any longer.
Our son who moved to Japan is turning into a mimimalist.
That's a shock to us, he always had everything his heart desired growing up.

As far as collection any sort of SS at reatirement age in Hungary, the last time my husband went into the SS office in person in Budapest, he was told you need a min. of 15 years work history in Hungary to qualify for even the lowest SS/ penison whatever you want to call it.
He did 9 long years here but it is not enought to collect a dime from Hungary for his retirement.

I wouldn't count on anything from Hungary if I were you.
Sorry, as my mom would say, "That's the way the cookie crumbles".
We are just glad we are living off our hard work in the USA and not from our hard work in Hungary. It just doesn't pay much here for retirement years.
We are greatful we don't have to pinch every penny if we really need something. We have learned to pass on some things but never shy away from buying something important that is for our health or well being.
There is nothing more important then ones health.
I'm sorry for the seniors here who must make due on a small income.
That being said, there are many very wealthy people here in Hungary as well.
I wonder what is going to happen when the start the digital money system? Maybe we will get 10 cents on the dollar in our bank accounts? Maybe they will start everyone from a zero balance?

cdw057 wrote:

...

Still inflation can hit us all heavily.

In some countries it's an total disaster of currency devaluation - look at Afghanistan.  Like anyone is going to stick to Afghanis.   The black market in USD must be thriving.  In Myanmar (Burma) it's impossible to get hold of foreign currency.   

Closer to here, the price of fuel is now 500 HUF.  If I remember correctly it was about 320 HUF at the beginning of the year.

Knock on effects everywhere down the supply chain.

cdw057 wrote:

I have had a Hungarian job for 7 years and so did my wife, I am very very curious what will come from our pension..

To receive the guaranteed Hungarian minimum pension you have to work in Hungary for 20 years. One can get a reduced, no lower limit, pension after working 15 years.

Seven years only in Hungary.... You may not get anything unless your national government where you are a citizen has an agreement with Hungary about pension payments. EU rules may also apply if an EU citizen (but not being an EU citizen, I am not familiar with those rules. But EU citizens can easily look them up.)

Hope this helps.

cdw057 wrote:

Bottom line Hungary is TOO getting expensive for me.

I guess this has a lot to do with lifestyle. And lifestyles differ. I do not buy alcohol or cigarettes for example. My largest single vice and expense is coffee (about 2000 HUF a month).

My basic subsistence costs in Hungary are about $2 a day (i.e. food costs, energy, internet, etc). That to me is pretty cheap. Everything else is simply funds I can "splurge".... :cool:

radiumpotato wrote:
cdw057 wrote:

I have had a Hungarian job for 7 years and so did my wife, I am very very curious what will come from our pension..

To receive the guaranteed Hungarian minimum pension you have to work in Hungary for 20 years. One can get a reduced, no lower limit, pension after working 15 years.

Seven years only in Hungary.... You may not get anything unless your national government where you are a citizen has an agreement with Hungary about pension payments. EU rules may also apply if an EU citizen (but not being an EU citizen, I am not familiar with those rules. But EU citizens can easily look them up.)

Hope this helps.

Hungary has agreements with many other countries on social security payments for reciprocal recognition.

Do you (or anyone) happen to know if one can make voluntary contributions to the HU pension fund? Mrs F is short on years from being abroad with me.  She's looking  into it but maybe we can find out faster so we can do something about it.

In my own country, it's easy to make contributions to make up the past 7 years.  Why 7 years? No idea but you can simply pay into the system voluntarily by making lump sum payments.   It might be the same here.

radiumpotato wrote:
cdw057 wrote:

Bottom line Hungary is TOO getting expensive for me.

I guess this has a lot to do with lifestyle. And lifestyles differ. I do not buy alcohol or cigarettes for example. My largest single vice and expense is coffee (about 2000 HUF a month).

My basic subsistence costs in Hungary are about $2 a day (i.e. food costs, energy, internet, etc). That to me is pretty cheap. Everything else is simply funds I can "splurge".... :cool:

What and how can you eat, heat and connect for $2 per day? 

Apart from radioactive krumpli?

fluffy2560 wrote:

What and how can you eat, heat and connect for $2 per day?

Like I said. It is about lifestyle. I have a very low key lifestyle. And I divided by two since my wife and I share expenses (ergo... that was "my" cost, not "household" costs -- in case there was any confusion).

For one thing, I am a vegetarian. I have a garden and get about half my food there. Shopping costs for required subsistence basics are about 6000 HUF every week for us both. So about $1.25 a day for me (excluding coffee).

Eon bill is about 8,000 HUF a month. About $.4 a day for me (again, half costs)

Heating by wood. We have land, and use some of our own wood. Extra wood costs about 70,000 HUF a year, cost spread over the year, about $.3 a day (again half costs).

Internet - 6000 HUF a month, again at half cost rate, about $.25 a day.

All approximations, but "within reality".... mostly.

$1.25+$.4+$.3+$.25 = $2.20 a day. Which is like I said. "About" $2 a day.

And again... Lifestyle makes a difference. Not everyone is living the Budapest or Hévíz life style.... Which is okay as well. Everyone can be different.  :top:

And... that is my subsistence costs. That is I can survive.... If I may or may not not fully enjoy it is another matter.  :cool:

P.S. Some may say I am extreme minimalist. And they may be right. But back in the USA similar extreme minimalists are paying maybe an order of magnitude more than I am here in Hungary. So... Basically, what I am saying is.... Hungary need not be an expensive place. It... depends....

Hope this helps.

radiumpotato wrote:
fluffy2560 wrote:

What and how can you eat, heat and connect for $2 per day?

Like I said. It is about lifestyle. I have a very low key lifestyle. And I divided by two since my wife and I share expenses (ergo... that was "my" cost, not "household" costs -- in case there was any confusion).

For one thing, I am a vegetarian. I have a garden and get about half my food there. Shopping costs for required subsistence basics are about 6000 HUF every week for us both. So about $1.25 a day for me (excluding coffee).

Eon bill is about 8,000 HUF a month. About $.4 a day for me (again, half costs)

Heating by wood. We have land, and use some of our own wood. Extra wood costs about 70,000 HUF a year, cost spread over the year, about $.3 a day (again half costs).

Internet - 6000 HUF a month, again at half cost rate, about $.25 a day.

All approximations, but "within reality".... mostly.

$1.25+$.4+$.3+$.25 = $2.20 a day. Which is like I said. "About" $2 a day.

And again... Lifestyle makes a difference. Not everyone is living the Budapest or Hévíz life style.... Which is okay as well. Everyone can be different.  :top:

And... that is my subsistence costs. That is I can survive.... If I may or may not not fully enjoy it is another matter.  :cool:

P.S. Some may say I am extreme minimalist. And they may be right. But back in the USA similar extreme minimalists are paying maybe an order of magnitude more than I am here in Hungary. So... Basically, what I am saying is.... Hungary need not be an expensive place. It... depends....

Hope this helps.

Have you got any kids there?  Or dogs or cats?  Cars?

We look like we're living it large compared to life in Krumpli megye.

We live really on the cheap here too.
Maybe about 1,700forints  per day on food for 2 people.
Sometimes even less then that.
We cook at home and sometimes have too much left overs.
I'd say overall we live on approx. $600. to $700. per month on average.
Some months more when auto insurnace is due but we are able to save every month and are not in any debt.
It's a nice feeling to be free of debt.

Lately however we've been spending on our health.
We don't smoke and I've been off my wine for months now and coffee I've also given up for now.
Biggest expense ATM is vitamins and minerals .
Been spending a couple hundred US bucks a month recently on shipments of AHCC from Japan and Finland.
Health is wealth.

fluffy2560 wrote:
radiumpotato wrote:
cdw057 wrote:

I have had a Hungarian job for 7 years and so did my wife, I am very very curious what will come from our pension..

To receive the guaranteed Hungarian minimum pension you have to work in Hungary for 20 years. One can get a reduced, no lower limit, pension after working 15 years.

Seven years only in Hungary.... You may not get anything unless your national government where you are a citizen has an agreement with Hungary about pension payments. EU rules may also apply if an EU citizen (but not being an EU citizen, I am not familiar with those rules. But EU citizens can easily look them up.)

Hope this helps.

Hungary has agreements with many other countries on social security payments for reciprocal recognition.

Do you (or anyone) happen to know if one can make voluntary contributions to the HU pension fund? Mrs F is short on years from being abroad with me.  She's looking  into it but maybe we can find out faster so we can do something about it.

In my own country, it's easy to make contributions to make up the past 7 years.  Why 7 years? No idea but you can simply pay into the system voluntarily by making lump sum payments.   It might be the same here.

You can pay into the system fr the years you lack in work years in Hungary.
You'd have to figure out if it is really worth what you'll get in return however.
My husband checked it out years ago.
He worked in the old commie system so the money wasn't like now.
things were reasonable back then, could ride the bus and trams for about 5 forint each way.
They told him he could pay for the 6 years he lacked to qualify for the 15 years of work history but the return wasn't very much. Just not worth it.
You'd have to figure out if you actually would get anything vs how many years of life you have left and how much you had to pay in to get anything.
We really don't need the 48,000 per month or whatever was on the table when we went in.
Not unless we get a quarantee that he will live to be 120 years old.
I know more peple who kicked it years before they could collect a dime in retirement then people who are living well in their ,"golden years" really they aren't all that golden, more like fools gold.

I paid myself a minimum wage and my wife even lower (part time), the purpose was (partially) to get into the system. For my pension I rely on my history in Luxembourg (worked 10+ years which is extremely generous (a third of employee, employer and governement (provided you worked 10+). As for Hungary I am pretty sure I will also something (Schengen), but do not expect much, worked many many years in the Netherlands also not too much. (I have to see on the UK, but a nice thing was there even I worked there for 2.5 years a voluntary (contributed by employer (not me) became EUR 50 K (no clue how this happened but it more than helps),
Overall I think for regular pension I expect Luxembourg to pay 65%, Netherlands for 25%, Hungary for 7 and UK for the remaing 7.

Please note I am not rich by any means, but capital (and hopefully pension) will allow me to live comfortably (just as I see not in Hungary (I do smoke, and drink))
Having a far too big house does not help (repairs, replacements of things,...)

Most people do downsize when they retire.

Marilyn Tassy wrote:

Most people do downsize when they retire.

I've seen that movie.

fluffy2560 wrote:
Marilyn Tassy wrote:

Most people do downsize when they retire.

I've seen that movie.

It is true, not a Hollywood script.
My  80 something year old neighbor didn't downsize though in Ca.
She had a cute home but lived alone with her tiny dog.
It was a shame her nice crystal clear swimming pool was only for show or the once a year swim party for her grandchildren.
She had her gardening  team of 4 men come every week to keep up her lawn and yard, a pool man.
4 large bedrooms and 2 full baths just for herself.
She spent 99% of her time in her front room which she had made into one huge room with windows all around so she could keep her eyes on the neighborhood.
She never used her kitchen , her son would either bring lunch everyday or take her out to lunch everyday.
She must of had a few bucks in her account because I know how expenisve having a pool was  we did our own lawn and pool care and it still wasn't cheap.
I can't really see us now in that home with empty rooms and a lawn to mow.

Marilyn Tassy wrote:
fluffy2560 wrote:
Marilyn Tassy wrote:

Most people do downsize when they retire.

I've seen that movie.

It is true, not a Hollywood script.
My  80 something year old neighbor didn't downsize though in Ca.
She had a cute home but lived alone with her tiny dog.
.....
I can't really see us now in that home with empty rooms and a lawn to mow.

I live my fantasy life by comparing it to movie scripts, reality shows, general TV and Hollywood gossip output.

There's quite a bit of stuff around on Discovery channel around tiny houses, renovating and messing about with construction.  Usually in places like Maine or Alaska. 

Some of the tiny houses are quite innovative but makes you wonder why people will bother there as land is probably a small percentage of the cost of providing a habitable place.   And materials like wood must be very cheap in those kinds of places.  Unlike here, where everything is made out of concrete and brick.  Very solid though.

I wish someone would come around here to construct our garden so we had an actual lawn available to mow.

We downsize in terms of size of property, likely also downsizing in the bill, having said that propably not in day-to-day living. actually me and my wife visited our GP this morning, he told me I have to eat more and swimming (I have to light but in bad condition). Hopefully will turkey bring me more frequent eating (currently once per day), swimming pool in the complex will probably help (swimming in the sea only from time to time I think). The smoking very strongly discouraged by the GP will probably not help (in Turkey financially not). drinking (he did not mention) is the around the same as in Hungary.

cdw057 wrote:

We downsize in terms of size of property, likely also downsizing in the bill, having said that propably not in day-to-day living. actually me and my wife visited our GP this morning, he told me I have to eat more and swimming (I have to light but in bad condition). Hopefully will turkey bring me more frequent eating (currently once per day), swimming pool in the complex will probably help (swimming in the sea only from time to time I think). The smoking very strongly discouraged by the GP will probably not help (in Turkey financially not). drinking (he did not mention) is the around the same as in Hungary.

As an ex-smoker I can appreciate the addiction but it's really a big risk to health.  Definitely worth thinking giving it up.  I'm now a non-smoker and non-drinker.  Smoking began to make me feel ill so  I gave up in my 40s.  And the drinking I stopped perhaps 3 years ago.  It seriously improved my blood pressure, I have more energy and lost some weight.  Overall it's working so I'll stick with it.  I've also added more plant based stuff to my diet and that's working well too. But the real improvement is walking about 15km a week.  That's made a big difference.

fluffy2560 wrote:

Have you got any kids there?  Or dogs or cats?  Cars?

We look like we're living it large compared to life in Krumpli megye.

As I said, the costs are mine. That is, what it costs me, myself and I to live for my subsistence costs*. I even excluded my wife. Don't tell her....  ;)

But to answer your other questions, no at home children (I don't think the OP has any either for example), no current pets (my dog of 14 years died this year**), no car since I am an avid cyclist (look at my avatar here) and easily haul 30 KG in my trailer to do shopping. So all part of my lifestyle that reduces costs. And I fully admit... that is certainly not going to be everyone's lifestyle. I am not tooting myself or judging others. Simply showing possibilities.

For those with 3 children, 5 pets, 2 cars, and extras like ex wives, gambling habits, expensive vacations***.... only to name a few different lifestyle options, things can be certainly different.

* And as I already said, other income I can enjoy however I want... and I do. After all, the money you save not spending on what you need, can be spent much more fun on what you want.....  :D

** I probably spent more on his health care the last year of his life than I did in all other costs he had for me the entire rest of his life. That was my choice, and my pleasure to make his last year as comfortable as possible.  Side note: Weirdly, everyone I know thinks they have the right to comment how much I did for my dog in his last year, often saying I should have done less (i.e. put him down), not knowing most of the issues were all treatable, and with treatment gave him a normal quality of life -- they were just expensive. I mention this only to avoid similar non-informed comments.

*** Actually, some expensive vacations, even for me, would be a nice change of pace.....  :cool:

radiumpotato wrote:

For those with 3 children, 5 pets, 2 cars, and extras like ex wives, gambling habits, expensive vacations***.... only to name a few different lifestyle options, things can be certainly different.

That's quite a list.  But only 2 cars?  I can see us eventually having up to 4 cars here when the kids come of driving age. There's a discount if you mass produce 4 x Hungarian children here.  And a free minivan. 

At one point we had more than 5 pets.  The kids ordered them.  We're down to a dog, a cat and some fish (I count them as one pet).

I see a lot of building work going on - people spending money on their houses and not expensive foreign holidays. Pandemic I suppose.  Might explain why we cannot get anyone to come around here to fix my garden/drains/shed/wall etc.

radiumpotato wrote:

.....
** I probably spent more on his health care the last year of his life than I did in all other costs he had for me the entire rest of his life. That was my choice, and my pleasure to make his last year as comfortable as possible. 

Side note: Weirdly, everyone I know thinks they have the right to comment how much I did for my dog in his last year, often saying I should have done less (i.e. put him down), not knowing most of the issues were all treatable, and with treatment gave him a normal quality of life -- they were just expensive. I mention this only to avoid similar non-informed comments...

Sorry about your dog.   I've heard from others than 7 years old is the point where dogs start to have health problems.  Don't know about cats so much.  Our cat is semi-feral so we only see it perhaps once a day.  On the other hand the dog hanging out with us 24x7.

We've discussed HU attitudes to domestic animals quite a lot in these forums.  My observation is that those in the countryside see cats and dogs as things/tools, not as family members and they wouldn't waste money and time on a sick animal which had little commercial value.  Town dwellers are more likely to think of them as pets and family members and will theoretically spend just about any amount.

Compared to  my own country (UK) veterinary care is cheap here.  If your dog or cat is ill there, it's much more likely to be put down simply because care is so high.  Spaying a medium sized dog (30-40kg sized) costs north of HUF 130K in the UK. It was much cheaper here, like HUF 30K.  Quite a difference.

fluffy2560 wrote:
radiumpotato wrote:

.....
** I probably spent more on his health care the last year of his life than I did in all other costs he had for me the entire rest of his life. That was my choice, and my pleasure to make his last year as comfortable as possible. 

Side note: Weirdly, everyone I know thinks they have the right to comment how much I did for my dog in his last year, often saying I should have done less (i.e. put him down), not knowing most of the issues were all treatable, and with treatment gave him a normal quality of life -- they were just expensive. I mention this only to avoid similar non-informed comments...

Sorry about your dog.   I've heard from others than 7 years old is the point where dogs start to have health problems.  Don't know about cats so much.  Our cat is semi-feral so we only see it perhaps once a day.  On the other hand the dog hanging out with us 24x7.

We've discussed HU attitudes to domestic animals quite a lot in these forums.  My observation is that those in the countryside see cats and dogs as things/tools, not as family members and they wouldn't waste money and time on a sick animal which had little commercial value.  Town dwellers are more likely to think of them as pets and family members and will theoretically spend just about any amount.

Compared to  my own country (UK) veterinary care is cheap here.  If your dog or cat is ill there, it's much more likely to be put down simply because care is so high.  Spaying a medium sized dog (30-40kg sized) costs north of HUF 130K in the UK. It was much cheaper here, like HUF 30K.  Quite a difference.

Veterinary care in the UK is extortionate.  Our pup managed to get an ear infection when he decided to teach himself to swim and dive headfirst into the river, so I took him to the vet yesterday - 15 minutes later we walked out with some ear drops and £77 less money in the bank.  I just checked on Amazon, I can buy the ear drops from them for £13, so next time he gets a sore ear, we'll be trying that first.

Our previous dog (Golden Retriever) lived until he was 18 years old; he'd had fits since he was born (he was a rescue dog that the previous owners got rid of because of the fits), but he responded well to massage therapy and apart from going blind in his last years, lived to a ripe old age, I still miss him.

We no longer have or wish to have a pet.
Reason being we hate to let them go and spare no expense on them, they are children to us.
We spent thousands of dollars on our Doberamn between this training, purchasing him, vet bills, having him in quaranteen in Hawaii for 4 months and me not working all that time so I could be free to spend my days in the cage/run with him 5 to 6 days per week.
The state of Hawaii charged $850. for the 4 months he was locked up plus any extras if needed. His crate to fly with was $165.00 if memory serves me. These are 1995 prices too.
Daily treats to keep him happy while locked up were perhaps $5.00 per day, he loved large chews from the pet store.
I remember paying $450. just so he could see a dermatologist who flew to HI every month for a skin clinic. Plus the cost of the tests for his skin rash.What a gig for that vet! Fly to Hawaii once a month for a week, charge $450 for an office visit and free holiday in Hawaii every month.

His last 18 months or so was costly as well.
He was on medications that cost more per lbs. At 108 lbs he costs about as much as a human to keep .
We actually never really counted the money spent on him but it was worth every dime.
In 1986 we paid over $500. for boarding him so we could visit Hungary.
I almost didn't go to Hungary because my heart didn't want to board him for so long,6 weeks.
It was a good kennel and they walked the dogs daily.
My mother was willing to keep him fr free but I thought he was in better care in a kennel, no worry abut someone letting him out of the yard .
My mother and many other people told me why spend $500. on a kennel, why not get rid of him and get another dog when you return? Some peple just don't get it. Like one could get rid of their child and pick out another one later.
We even paid over $300. in 1999 to have him cremated and get his ashes back.
Think I'm not rich enough these days to have a pet.

Healthcare, being for animals or for humans ourself is very important, life even more important, we had 2 (big) dogs and a certain period of time 6 (!!!) cats, two of the cats died of age (15+), some died (or just disappeared. (We left with 2 (wonderful) cats), we found a neighbour (admittedly for genereous compensation as we are moving an apartment (not village where they are used to). The remaining dog had to be put to asleep (very very loyal, but agressive to any outside of the household).

Sad period, but I felt best we can do.
For humans, I probably care not as much (our choices to eat, drink and even smoke).  (This includes myself).
What is sad is that money can buy (even if cats from a friendly babuschka), the cats were family for many many years, but they like home and not so much people and going into a (small) apartment (???)

OK me and my wife has some health issues, but all of us have when getting older, in any case we can complain and go to a doctor (GP), for cats (and dogs) it is more difficult.

Marilyn Tassy wrote:

We no longer have or wish to have a pet.
Reason being we hate to let them go and spare no expense on them, they are children to us.
We spent thousands of dollars on our Doberamn between this training, purchasing him, vet bills, having him in quaranteen in Hawaii for 4 months and me not working all that time so I cld be free to spend my days in the cage/run with him 5 to 6 days per week.
His last 18 months or so was costly as well.
He was on medications that cost more per lbs. At 108 lbs he costs about as much as a human to keep .
We actually never really counted the money spent on him but it was worth every dime.
We even paid over $300. in 1999 to have him cremated and get his ashes back.
Think I'm not rich enough these days to have a pet.

I don't know, people have these "pocket dogs" like little terriers.  They look like fashion accessories more than pets to some people.   

But some dogs like a Jack Russell are nice little dog, tough and strong which doesn't take up much room and wouldn't cost so much to keep.  When I was a kid,  we used to dog sit a Jack Russell and it was a lot of fun (especially when you're under about 12.)   

For some reason I've seen a lot of people walking Sausage Dogs recently.  Seems to be a popular dog suddenly.

fluffy2560 wrote:
Marilyn Tassy wrote:

We no longer have or wish to have a pet.
Reason being we hate to let them go and spare no expense on them, they are children to us.
We spent thousands of dollars on our Doberamn between this training, purchasing him, vet bills, having him in quaranteen in Hawaii for 4 months and me not working all that time so I cld be free to spend my days in the cage/run with him 5 to 6 days per week.
His last 18 months or so was costly as well.
He was on medications that cost more per lbs. At 108 lbs he costs about as much as a human to keep .
We actually never really counted the money spent on him but it was worth every dime.
We even paid over $300. in 1999 to have him cremated and get his ashes back.
Think I'm not rich enough these days to have a pet.

I don't know, people have these "pocket dogs" like little terriers.  They look like fashion accessories more than pets to some people.   

But some dogs like a Jack Russell are nice little dog, tough and strong which doesn't take up much room and wouldn't cost so much to keep.  When I was a kid,  we used to dog sit a Jack Russell and it was a lot of fun (especially when you're under about 12.)   

For some reason I've seen a lot of people walking Sausage Dogs recently.  Seems to be a popular dog suddenly.

I think for a tiny dog a mini-pini is cute.
They seem to act like they are a full sized dog and not a mini-just full of themselves.
They also remind me of a shrunken Doberman.

Our latest dog is a Patterdale Terrier - they're a medium-size breed; I'd never heard of them before and we got Boris from one of my wife's patients; he turned up in the surgery with his legs badly scratched and when my wife asked what had happened, he said his dogs had produced pups - 5 days later we had Boris and he is an amazing dog, currently fast asleep on my feet.

Dachsunds (sausage dogs) were initially bred as hunting dogs - rodents and badgers, they even have a miniature breed; wouldn't be my 1st choice - very hard to house train.

Cynic wrote:

Our latest dog is a Patterdale Terrier - they're a medium-size breed; I'd never heard of them before and we got Boris from one of my wife's patients; he turned up in the surgery with his legs badly scratched and when my wife asked what had happened, he said his dogs had produced pups - 5 days later we had Boris and he is an amazing dog, currently fast asleep on my feet.

Dachsunds (sausage dogs) were initially bred as hunting dogs - rodents and badgers, they even have a miniature breed; wouldn't be my 1st choice - very hard to house train.

Aw, puppies are nice.  If you had two dogs the same, you could call the other one Doris. Or Johnson.

My bro sent me videos of his cavapoo.  Apparently it's obsessed with chasing squirrels and has taken up trying to climb trees.

I don't know why Sausage Dogs are around so much now.  Or why I see people with them in the forest.  It seems a very strange dog to take walking in the burb forests of Budapest.  All those little legs and rough terrain.

Why are they hard to house train? I suppose they understand mainly German.  Or Sausage.

I am not sure which is the wurst.

Marilyn Tassy wrote:

...
My mother and many other people told me why spend $500. on a kennel, why not get rid of him and get another dog when you return? Some peple just don't get it. Like one could get rid of their child and pick out another one later.
We even paid over $300. in 1999 to have him cremated and get his ashes back.
Think I'm not rich enough these days to have a pet.

Just a couple of years ago, I would have been one of those people saying it doesn't really matter about the dog, i.e. it's just nothing really, one out and one in, don't have any affection for it. 

Or I wouldn't have a dog at all. I was worried it would be a real tie and we'd always be in a bind finding someone to look after it. 

But perhaps not unusually, I've come to appreciate her much more.  She's been a surprise asset since the pandemic.  It's given me something more to do more than sitting at a desk or domestic DIY etc. And she forces me out to do exercise in a routine way.  We've just come back from 3.5km and ~40 minutes brisk walking around one of the hills here. 

I am not sure about my feelings towards her.  From personal experience I know that people "fall in love" with their children - part of bonding with them. I am not sure I'm "in love" with the dog even though she is more or less a member of the family.  I like her though but love, no, don't think so. 

I know she's keen on me as I'm chief dog walker and her personal snackologist.

When we first brought our little Dobie puppy home my husband said he would never have a place in the house fr him.
He was being toilet trained when we got him so we had him indoors but in the laundry room near the back door.
He couldn't mess up to much of the house at night being in the laundry room.
My husband's big plan was to build him a doghouse and have him outdors.
Never happened. He had his own room in our house,  a nice corner rom where he could gaurd from several sides or the property.
Dogs never eat with humans, well ours did.
He had his dinner by himself but always jined us at the dinner table for a few snacks.
His chin would rest ontop of the dinning table and his eyes would just roll around waiting for his treats.
He was tall enough that he could eat off a dish from our table if he stood.
He even ate with a soup spoon and fork at times!
Call us crazy but we loved him like a child.
In fact to this day our son says his brother was a dog.

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