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Several WAYS to move to Indonesia [per Feb 2016]

There are several ways to move to Indonesia to live.
Let us examine the methods use below and by no means exhaustive coverage of all.
The aim is to educate people of ways to come to Indonesia and live among its people and even make Indonesia a second home.

1) Skills and Work
You can get employed by an Indonesian institution and if you meet the government criterias, you can apply for a work permit sponsored by your Employer
http://www.indonesianembassy.org.uk/con … yment.html

2) Marriage
You can get married to an Indonesian and get Spousal Visa sponsored by your spouse.
http://www.indonesianembassy.org.uk/con … rried.html

3) Retirement
You can apply for yearly retirement Visa and meet the requirement of Indonesian retirees program. And no work involved.
http://kjri-perth.org.au/index.php/visa … ment-visa/

4) Cultural Visa Pass
For social visit, cultural learning and even studying. And no work involved.
http://www.indonesianembassy.org.uk/con … ocial.html

5) Investment
http://www.bkpm.go.id/

Indonesian government wants investment, and not only expertise.
And the government has set up a single window called BKPM -  Badan Koordinasi Penanaman Modal in provinces to assist in these processes.
For example 3 hours - same day service. or 3 to 5 days services to get your company started up.

The recent February 2016 Indonesian Economic Package.
New versus Old Maximum Allowed Foreign Ownership:

Industry                                                     New %Share                 Old %Share
Warehouse Distributor                         67%                                  33%
Cold Storage                                            100%                                  33%
Business Training                                         67%                                  49%
Travel Agency                                        67%                                 49%
Golf Course                                                67%                                 49%
Transport Supporting Services                 67%                                49%
Sport Center                                               100%                                49%
Film Production Houses                      100%                                49%
Crumb Rubber                                      100%                                49%
Museums                                              67%                               51%
Catering                                                     67%                                51%
Convention Services                              67%                                51%
Exhibitions & Travel Incentives           67%                               51%
Restaurant                                              100%                                51%
Construction Consultancy                    67%                                       55%
Telecommunication Services            67%                                      65%
Raw Materials for Medicines          100%                                       85%
Toll Road                                           100%                                    95%
Telecommunication Testing Agency     100%                     95%

http://www.dealstreetasia.com/stories/28156-28156/

You might want to revise the “Skills and Work” section of your post to more accurately convey the fact that a work permit is required for foreigners to work in Indonesia, and that applies to whether or not they work for their own company, or another employer. 

This link I provide below does a far better job of accurately describing what is required to legally work in Indonesia.  You might also emphasize that if the job skills necessary to perform the job functions can be found within the Indonesian citizenry, then a foreigner’s application is very likely to be turned down. 

Have a look at this link and see for yourself: 

http://www.indosight.com/blog/2015-new- … indonesia/

enduringword :

There are several ways to move to Indonesia to live.
Let us examine the methods use below and by no means exhaustive coverage of all.
The aim is to educate people of ways to come to Indonesia and live among its people and even make Indonesia a second home.

1) Skills and Work
You can get employed by an Indonesian institution and if you meet the government criterias, you can apply for a work permit sponsored by your Employer
http://www.indonesianembassy.org.uk/con … yment.html

2) Marriage
You can get married to an Indonesian and get Spousal Visa sponsored by your spouse.
http://www.indonesianembassy.org.uk/con … rried.html

3) Retirement
You can apply for yearly retirement Visa and meet the requirement of Indonesian retirees program. And no work involved.
http://kjri-perth.org.au/index.php/visa … ment-visa/

4) Cultural Visa Pass
For social visit, cultural learning and even studying. And no work involved.
http://www.indonesianembassy.org.uk/con … ocial.html

5) Investment
http://www.bkpm.go.id/

Good topic and I think this information is very important for those considering moving to Indonesia.

“Good topic and I think this information is very important for those considering moving to Indonesia.”

Especially for those with a minimum US $7.6 million dollars to invest via BKPM.   :top:

We should be clear, the work permit requirements tend to be pretty strict, essentially allowing only people with skills unavailable or rare in the Indonesian workforce to obtain one.
Once the work permit is issued, the visa is pretty much automatic for the vast majority.
It should also be noted, the applications for this are normally completed by the employer, so the employee should have very little part to play, save supplying documents and/or photocopies of them.

Investment is a wonderful thing (With some reservations), so I would normally encourage it, but that's a very limited number of people because of the big numbers involved. As I'm not mega rich, I know little of these peoples' internet surfing habits, but I would think they have lawyers to check out immigration requirements for them, so whilst mentioning massive investment is valid, it's not all that likely to be read by anyone it applies to.

Marriage is the way I entered Indonesia and obtained my first visa, but it should be noted, immigration are pretty hot at spotting scam marriages intended to get someone into the country. One hint of a set up job or anything smells wrong to the officer and they're round in a flash.
I had no problems at all because I lived in a place where everyone knows everyone else, so it was pretty obvious our marriage is real.

Fred, you raise a good point.  Finding an Indonesian wife or husband is of course not a valid way to accomplish the goal of moving to Indonesia.  Funny though how it sometimes seems to be expressed in exactly that manner.   ;)

We both probably know a few expats who have taken that approach, and we also both probably know just how badly things ended up for that hapless expat.  And of course that "bad ending" had nothing to do with immigration...rather, it had everything to do with the Indonesian spouse, who via karma (or whatever one wants to call it), ended up with "all the marbles."   :D

This is regarding to the Business Investment section.

There are seemingly alot of negativities.
If it doesnt concern or impact you directly, please allow the OP and the other forum readers benefit in finding the information themselves. Encourage them to find more, rather than discourage them.

I get the feeling that the general concern in high investment dollars, which is not true.
The high roller business of 100 M is just an example how committed Indonesian government is when a time limit is introduced - to what is actually possible. It doesnt need to take long.
However, normal processes for other normal business is faster now. Days only and online information or contacts is available.
Anyone can invest in that sectors the Indonesian government has opened up. It doesnt take alot of money to setup restaurant business, catering business, and training skills business. The BKPM is a one stop service for all businesses. Even local businesses now go there to find help in processing documents. So it is not just foreigners.
You are living in Indonesia, you love Indonesia, though you were not born here. And you have faith in Indonesian people. I applaud you for that.
And do have faith in the Indonesian government too, with its many broken system and yet the intention is clear to fix it. Where Service "layanan in Indonesia" is foremost.
We have several. good examples:
1) Indonesian President took on the role of a Salesman, he went on many countries and pitch in investors. Never before that happens in such a large scale.
2) Indonesian President went on repeatedly to infrastructure projects of building roads and etc, repeatedly in a year. The idea is that he said:" If I went there several times, then the minister must go there more than me, and his governor and underlings must go there even more. He has no ego about it, and doesn't feel it is beneath him to supervise and look.
3) The Indonesian Civil government Kelurahan and Kecamatan now opens One Stop Service PTSP. And some regencies in Tangerang and Jakarta even opens up till late on Friday night. The idea is service to the people. Some even propositioned to be open on Alternate Saturdays.
4) The idea in the future, many services can be implemented there, including all types of permits. Including Kitas, driving license, food permit - all under proposal. One window, one service.
5) We have this Jakarta Smart city officially launch date is June 2016. Where the population as auditors of the government work.
6) Single website to the president office, reporting complaints and connecting to the various bureaucracy of government.
www.lapor.go.id
We have all these mental revolution championed by the President several years ago, on a campaign platform. We have seen the effects even in 1 to 2 years. It cannot be build instantly, we are seeing continuous progress.
The people I have talked with are all optimistic about Indonesia and the potential it will bring. We are catching up with Singapore, Malaysia and Hong Kong, we had a slow start in the beginning. We have encouraging promises that we could be more than we are now. Indonesian asset is PEOPLE and population. The same with India and China.
We believe that Indonesia in a decade time and a few decades will be an important centre in this region.
Indonesia as a country is serious in bringing investment to Indonesia.  It will benefit to everyone in Indonesia and the living standards is continually improved and what is broken is gradually fixed.
The USD to Rupiah has improved significantly from 14,000 to 13200 now. After the Indonesian government realised it has to bring in more proactive reforms in the economy and changed many of the regulations.
For better and worse, we all want Indonesia to grow prosperous and the people living there too.

Ubudian :

“Good topic and I think this information is very important for those considering moving to Indonesia.”

Especially for those with a minimum US $7.6 million dollars to invest via BKPM.   :top:

Please visit the websites and contact, before making final judgments.
All investments big and small are welcomed in Indonesia.
Even local Indonesian businesses use the service BKPM to get things done in a One Stop Service. And in the future, it will be expanded.

BKPM - INDONESIA INVESTMENT COORDINATING BOARD
HQ in Jakarta.

Contact One Stop Service:
http://www.bkpm.go.id/en/contact

BKPM Regional Provinces in Indonesia
http://www.bkpm.go.id/en/contact/regional-offices


BKPM - Has many representative offices overseas that you can contact on, in the countries you reside. Do a search here.

http://www.bkpm.go.id/en/contact/bkpm-o … ive-office


Some Countries has close cooperation with BKPM and has put their own offices too.
http://www.bkpm.go.id/en/contact/foreign-desk-in-bkpm

I'm not making any judgements.  My comment is only to point out that in your initial post, your item #5 "Investments" would have far greater use and meaning to those reading this forum if it wasn't limited to investments fast tracked through BKBM which require a minimum investment of US $7.6 million dollars and are limited to those foreign investment companies who will be employing at least 1,000 locals. 

Seriously, just how many folks do you think who read this forum are considering investing 7.6 million dollars into Indonesia? 

"All investments big and small are welcomed in Indonesia."

So, with that in mind, let's concentrate on the smaller ones...like a PT company or something more likely to be within reason for the average reader.

Ubudian :

I'm not making any judgements.  My comment is only to point out that in your initial post, your item #5 "Investments" would have far greater use and meaning to those reading this forum if it wasn't limited to investments fast tracked through BKBM which require a minimum investment of US $7.6 million dollars and are limited to those foreign investment companies who will be employing at least 1,000 locals. 

Seriously, just how many folks do you think who read this forum are considering investing 7.6 million dollars into Indonesia? 

"All investments big and small are welcomed in Indonesia."

So, with that in mind, let's concentrate on the smaller ones...like a PT company or something more likely to be within reason for the average reader.

It was not limited to 7.6 million dollars.
That is why you havent read the article, websites and even contacted the office.

Big and small investment, Indonesia accept and encourage investments from other countries.
It is an opening up by the Indonesian government, similar to Visa Free to 168 countries for 1 month stay in Indonesia, non renewable and no work. The idea is that foreigners are welcome to Indonesia.

Ubudian :

"It was not limited to 7.6 million dollars."

I found that right on the home page of the BKBM web site that you linked to. 

Of course it's worded using IDR, and it states, "minimum foreign investment 100 billion IDR.  That's about 7.6 million US dollars.

You really need to read carefully, I cannot see how you fail to see that if without intentions.

The 7.6 Million dollars investment is specifically for 30 mins to 3 hours big business only - approved category business.

For other businesses, the criteria are standards normal business. And the process is one stop service and a single window. This is Indonesian government initiative to streamline and improve the processes for foreign investors and local Indonesian businesses to get the best service they can hope for.

Large investments are genarally welcome, but smaller ones are more likely.
That makes posts regarding setting up a PT the most likely to be useful to readers.
That doesn't mean there's anything wrong with mentioning major investment, just fewer people are likely to care or even bother reading a forum to get that information.

Fred :

Large investments are genarally welcome, but smaller ones are more likely.
That makes posts regarding setting up a PT the most likely to be useful to readers.
That doesn't mean there's anything wrong with mentioning major investment, just fewer people are likely to care or even bother reading a forum to get that information.

You can get assistance for setting up a PT or any other forms, in BKPM.
Fred, please read the website first, and the aims of Indonesian government, as I said here.

Regarding setting up your business venture as a way to move Indonesia, I would like to clarify that it doesnt take so much money as was indicated earlier.
The high bar of investment and thus special treatment is only for certain category of businesses.

There are more sectors opened up by the Indonesian government.
And there are other business such as restaurant or catering or something else that you can find more information. For your interests, restaurant can now be 100% foreign owned.

In the old days, setting up a company for foreigners has to go to different channels of government. Now the BKPM is there to guide the process and to be the place for submission of documents.

Please look here for the process of setting up a business in whole Indonesia and opportunities breakdown in each province.
http://www.bkpm.go.id/en/home-investment

http://www.bkpm.go.id/en/investment-pro … ur-company

enduringword :

All investments big and small are welcomed in Indonesia.

It's very clear large investments are welcome, but I have seen not a lot that suggests a foreigner is likely to get a visa to stay here that is based on investing in a small restaurant (or whatever) that is likely to compete directly with local business.

Of course I'm not a businessman here, nor have I any intention of becoming one, so perhaps you could post links to the sites that explain how small investments are welcome, and a visa will be issued to run them.

EDIT - If memory serves, the minimum investment for a PT is about Rp10 billion, far less than the Rp100 billion the major investment program is looking for, but that could be out of date now.
As small investments are seemingly welcome, I'm sure you can link to sites with more up to date information.

Thanks in advance for the help you'll be able to provide to forum users. :)

I'd like to teach English in Indonesia.  I plan on moving there in the next few years, maybe 2 or 3 at the most.  I have been there once and loved it.  I am planing another trip this year and one more before I actually move.  Any suggestions?  I'm planning in Bandung area of Java most likely.

You're American, so that's step one sorted out before you even start.
You must have a degree and a teaching certificate.
After that, it's finding a job. English first is one of many chain language schools here, but salaries tend to be a lot better in one of the international schools.

Bandung is a nice choice because it has a lot of history, old historic buildings and so many tree lined streets with colonial bungalows. It has a cooler climate than much of Indonesia and is not hectic or stressful the way that Jakarta is. People often visit Bandung because of it's many factory outlets and for it's food. The city is surrounded by mountains and there are many things to do and see in the countryside. People are also considered as very friendly compared to Jakarta people. It can take as little as 2 hours to drive to Jakarta or 3 1/2 hours by train so it's location is good. It is a city that feels like a town.

Personally I could have chosen any part of Indonesian to live in but we chose Bandung. We even moved my in-laws from a place called BSD to Bandung to give them a better lifestyle. So I think it's a good choice especially if you want to avoid the more stressful Jakarta and it's traffic problems.

I did teach hs here in the states but that was over 15 years ago.  Do I need to get another credential and from where.  I am sure mine expired because I only taught 5 years and moved on.

I hear that I might need to go to or take a course from one of those TESOL schools.  So I may check into one of those.  Is there an age limit?  I'll be 60 by time I move there so my guess is I may be considered too old.

Yes you will need a Teaching English Certificate in order to teach in Indonesia as well as a degree. I wouldn't have thought there is an age limit to attending one of those courses, but you'll need to double check on whether there is any age limit for teaching English in Indonesia. Perhaps you could send a pm to Lukereg who works at English First Language School or Fred who is the Indonesian Expert.

Digitarius,

You might find the following link to be helpful: 

http://www.internationalteflacademy.com … broad-asia

Nice link Roy.

I noticed that under "Requirements to teach in Indonesia", nationals from Ireland and South Africa have been included along with the usual UK, USA, Canada, NZ and Australia.

It might be worth reconfirming the regulations regarding exactly which countries native English speakers may come from in order to teach in Indonesia as in the past we have been told that only nationals from the UK, USA, Canada, NZ and Australia were eligible.

Regards,
Hansson

Isn’t northern Ireland considered part of the UK?  As for SA, who knows?  But we all are used to variations from one web site to another.  It would seem a logical idea for any English speaker from SA to check with the private school they have in mind for a teaching job to see if they are considered a “native” English speaker or not.  ;)

In the case you’re alluding to, (folks from SA), it was the lack of a college degree which eliminated them from consideration.  All else was moot.

Yes Northern Ireland is part of the UK. But Ireland is a completely different country.

But my point is simply to ask for clarification on which countries native English speakers seeking to teach English in Indonesia may come from. This would benefit those South Africans and Irish people interested to work in this beautiful land who may in the past have believed that they were not eligible.

In the past we have seen nationals from many countries asking whether it is possible to teach English in Indonesia, and they have always been told that only nationals from the five countries, UK, USA, Canada, NZ and Australia were eligible. So if there is a chance for them to work it would be good for them to know and for us too so that we know we are giving the correct advice.

Hansson :

Nice link Roy.

I noticed that under "Requirements to teach in Indonesia", nationals from Ireland and South Africa have been included along with the usual UK, USA, Canada, NZ and Australia.

I've also seen a couple of adverts with those requirements, but most still advertise for the five countries' citizens.
This TBI example is from this week.

http://id.jobsdb.com/id/en/job/native-n … 3001571629

Luke will probably know of any change in regulation without having to look it up.

@ Hansson

My suspicion is that it has to do with possible dual citizenship issues (particularly regarding SA)…but who knows?  You'll note that the TBI ad specifically states "passport holders" and then lists the usual countries. 

As I said, anyone who regards themselves as a native English speaker and is unclear if a particular private school in Indonesia would regard them as such, should, by simple due diligence, check it out.

Most of the posters who ask about eligibility to teach English in Indonesia do not have any particular school in mind. They are asking general questions about the possibility of being able to come to live and work in Indonesia as an English teacher. They come to this Forum so that they can hopefully get some useful advice.

Hansson :

Most of the posters who ask about eligibility to teach English in Indonesia do not have any particular school in mind. They are asking general questions about the possibility of being able to come to live and work in Indonesia as an English teacher. They come to this Forum so that they can hopefully get some useful advice.

In that case the advice which has been typically given on this forum for years meets this criteria of “useful advice”…viz, passport holders from the UK, US, Australia, Canada and New Zealand.  Of course that may not cover 100% of inquires, especially in the case of dual citizenship, and one can surely imagine other specifics that might come into play as well.

Anyone holding a passport from one of those five countries is unquestionably eligible to pursue an English teaching job in Indonesia (assuming they also meet the educational and certification requirements).  Anyone else should consider consulting with the particular school they have in mind because…this being Indonesia, we can fully suspect that not all schools will operate in exactly the same manner.
Thank you for your help.

Post 30 was correct up to the last time I checked.
I have noticed some job ads asking for citizens of 7 countries, but I haven't looked too closely at most. The couple I have looked at were for English speakers, but not English teachers.
Given South Africa only has about 31% first language English speakers, it's unlikely that country has been added to the list.

The total absence of 'chatter' about any change in the requirements probably puts the possibility to bed.

Ubudian :

I see you have an interest in this, so perhaps you could help forum members by posting links to reliable sites showing up to date information, probably from government sources.
I would normally try to do so but I'm very busy at the moment. Thank you for your help.

Thank you for your kind offer Roy.

Yes I am interested to know what the situation is regarding nationals of Ireland and South Africa and why some schools can offer them teaching jobs whereas we are always being told that they are not eligible to teach in Indonesia. It will be interesting to know how that works. However, I don't do that "searching the net, just to post links" thing.

As I think Fred said earlier, perhaps Luke is in a better position to clarify the situation. I am sure it will benefit potential expats wanting to come here from those countries and actually good for all of us to know so that we can be certain to always give the correct information to other posters.

Searching the net and referring to links provides lots of useful information, and as such you might regard this discussion linked below to be a good read.

Albeit dating from 2010, this “teacher’s chat” provides a lot of insight into the issue of whether or not Irish folks are considered native speakers or not insofar as English teaching jobs are concerned.

As you might note, and as I specifically mentioned earlier, this depends on what school is involved. 

http://www.livinginindonesiaforum.org/a … cd60800ae6

As for SA, I can find no other web site that even discusses, let alone establishes any firm documentation as to whether or not they are considered native English speakers.

Certainly we all want to be sure that we provide the most accurate and up to date information as possible, thus regarding this manner, and as already stated, the usual response…UK, Canada, US, Australia and New Zealand both historically, and currently seems to prevail.

By all means go ahead and research it Roy. I'm actually busy playing with my children and we are watching a movie on TV. I think we get 13 HD channels with our current package so lots of great movies for all the family to watch.

Do have a wonderful weekend....

Regards,
Hansson

Not sharing the same level of interest in this as you have, I'm done researching this...the rest is up to you.

Enjoy the movie with your kids.   :top:

Cheers.  -Roy

Fred, do you know if there is an age limit on someone looking to teach English in Indonesia.  I will be 60 by time I move there and was wondering if my age might be an issue. Or do you know of someone who would know the answer.  Thanks.

Unless there has been recent changes, and I don’t believe there has been any, the age limit for teachers is 60, teachers with a masters 65, and full professors, 70. 

http://sa.itb.ac.id/Ketentuan%20Lain/UU … sen%29.pdf

In the event you are planning on volunteer work as a teacher, no worries as these age restrictions apply to the issuance of the IMTA (work permit) which isn't needed for unpaid volunteer work.

Ubudian beat me to the mark. Thanks.

Thanks for this great explanation...

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