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Adapting to the Maltese Lifestyle

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Malta's climate is one of the main factors why tourists come to this Mediterranean Island. Winter in Malta is relatively warm with mild rainfalls from November through to February. Another typical Mediterranean feature is that a lot of shops are closed during festivities/festivals and around lunchtime.

Malta has two official languages: Maltese and English. According to Eurobarometer 100% of the local population speak Maltese, 88% speak English, 66% speak Italian, and 17% speak French. This widespread knowledge of languages makes Malta one of the most multilingual countries in the European Union and very attractive for expats to easily get acquainted with the local culture.  

Many public holidays and festivals are devoted to various saints, who are honoured by traditional processions. Festivals in Malta can be quite loud and colourful. Whenever there is a festival, you can easily spot ginormous flags and blocked streets ready to welcome anyone. Most celebrations have a religious origin; however, they are not celebrated in a tranquil way. The Maltese like to celebrate and love to show their cheerful spirit in fireworks and dancing. So, if you are an outgoing and energetic person, adapting to the Maltese lifestyle can be very easy.

The Maltese are very sociable and friendly people who love to go to bars and restaurants. In addition, they love to share drinks and food with their friends and family. Thanks to their open, friendly and pleasant character, they can also be a person to rely on if you need help. For instance, if you are sincere and honest with them, you will find yourself very welcome within their families and they will share everything with you.

Some expats in Malta enjoy special tax status as they have taken advantage of a special residency programme and a lot also consider the option of opening or starting their own company. A major contributor to their business decision is the Malta tax system that offers many benefits. For example, Malta has many double tax treaty agreements with over 70 countries which create a number of tax planning opportunities. Malta also has no wealth nor inheritance taxes, nor annual property taxes. These advantages allow expats to consider Malta as a top place when considering countries to relocate to within the EU.  

The neighboring island of Gozo, on the other hand is more rural and greener than its bigger sister island of Malta. It is much more peaceful and tranquil with the occupants enjoying a much more laid back way of life. Comino (another Maltese island) has just four permanent residents altogether. However, tourists flock on the isle because of the crystal-clear waters of Blue Lagoon.  

In general, adapting to the Maltese lifestyle only takes simple attributes for you to have: to be open and genuine. The local communities care for each other and love to talk and share thoughts with each other all the time. Maltese national dishes are a gastronomical sensation, full of flavour and colour. The recipes are strongly influenced by Malta’s proximity to Sicily and North Africa. 

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Member since 01 June 2008
Small earth, Mauritius
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