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Immigration/Consul labyrinth question

Greetings!
My husband and I both retired last year. We are getting rid of almost everything and moving to Chapala area Mexico.
In the dizzying process of planning travel (we are selling our home and cars, going to fly down) I wonder how people maneuver the horse vs cart timing labyrinth?
It is dizzying, as we see the Mexican Consul here in Denver on 6.18.18. At that time we are supposed to give him our address in Mexico, and date of departure.
But we haven't sold our house yet, and don't know how long it will take to get our Residente Temporal VISA. We would like confirmation before we sell.
Any ideas? I know many people have gone through is process. Any help would be appreciated!

Hi, my wife and I moved FULLTIME to Mexico last August so went trought the process.

New process might be in place for the Visa larga duracion (up to 10 years) because lots of foreigners have the permanent or temporary residency cards and spend only the winter in Mexico.

If your intention is to live FULLTIME in Mexico and have comply with the financial criterias  then I suggest you request the  permanent visa (1 time process with INM in Mexico and cheaper).
List of all visa for foreigners:
https://www.gob.mx/tramites

Our case, we live in Nayarit:

1- sold our belongings within 2 months (lucky I guest) but occupied and used it until 1 day prior to departure (24-08-2017)
2- appointment with consulate one month before departure (25-07-2017) duration 90 minutes got permanent visa approval the kept our passports a few days to glue the visa within it. Also had our birth and marriage certificates certified (being Canadians apostle process for Americans)
3- our mexican address was know but you could have a hotel address for the appointment, but at INM better to have the official address because any change must be reported to INM
4- arrived in Mexico with 4 suitcases plus 2 carry-on didn't need more everything available in Mexico (26-08-2017) IMPORTANT on the FMM form given on the plane the CANJE box is marked thus the INM officer will stamp and give 30 days for you to go to the INM office
5- INM process (3 visits - 14 days total), all done ourselves, we speak Spanish but the INM reps often speak english. 1st: pictures, payment, copies, 2nd: fingerprints and certificates of CANJE to permanent residency status, 3rd: pickup of official residency cards on 12-09-2017. (lucky we always have been served by the same INM rep)
https://www.inm.gob.mx/gobmx/word/index.php/jalisco/

Afterwards, got the following:
1- Nayarit driver's license
2- INAPAM old age rebate cards
3- IMSS insurance coverage

Within 2 months of our arrival, we were settled in and enjoying life.

PS:
1- we are renting less maintenance and great value (2 bdr, full equipped 9000$ pesos/month)
2- we don't have a vehicule because everything walking distance from our apartment (butcher, fish market, groceries, fruit stores, hospital, doctors, dentist, restaurants) (1km or less)

Adios y buena suerte en su proyecto, GyC.

Thank you so much for your helpful reaponse!
Good and wise suggestions. We are debating the purchase vs rental ideas.
We have wondered about the residente Permanente VISA.
I understood these all have to be initiated in the States, then completed in Mexico.
Thank you again for your post, greatly appreciated!
Colleen

The immigration office here in Chapala is used to a lot of foreigners coming down. The process is fairly quick and you will usually have your temporary or permanente (whatever you entered the country with) in  a month, maybe 6 weeks tops. This can often be reduced with the aid of a immigration lawyer. They are very cheap here so it might not be a bad investment but they do speak English at the immigration office here which helps smooth things out. As the other poster said, try to get a permanente visa if possible, cheaper in the long run but worst case you come in on a temporary. Bad side about that is that you can't buy a car with a temporary

Thank you for your input. I wasn't aware one can't purchase vehicle with temporary. One more reason to go straight for the permanente!
Hoping this all goes smoothly~
So many details, like spinning plates!
:/

We have all been through it. Just take one thing at a time and it will all get done  :)

A great reminder- thank God we are retired, and may take this at a pace that works for us.
Such a bittersweet endeavor, as we LOVE Colorado, and have grown sons here.
But we LOVE lakeside - the people are the kindest, gentlest I have ever met.
Thanks again for your ideas.
😊

I appreciate the ideas and helpful hints. We are still wondering about the travel date. How particular is the consul regarding this? Our appt with Mexican Consul is on June 18th, our home is on the market, but we don't know for sure when we will be traveling to Mexico. Should we plunk in a date, we may need to change it...

rmajijic :

The immigration office here in Chapala is used to a lot of foreigners coming down. The process is fairly quick and you will usually have your temporary or permanente (whatever you entered the country with) in  a month, maybe 6 weeks tops. This can often be reduced with the aid of a immigration lawyer. They are very cheap here so it might not be a bad investment but they do speak English at the immigration office here which helps smooth things out. As the other poster said, try to get a permanente visa if possible, cheaper in the long run but worst case you come in on a temporary. Bad side about that is that you can't buy a car with a temporary

A Residente Temporal can buy a vehicle, get a Mexican drivers license and join Mexican Socialized Medicine.

alleycat1 :
rmajijic :

The immigration office here in Chapala is used to a lot of foreigners coming down. The process is fairly quick and you will usually have your temporary or permanente (whatever you entered the country with) in  a month, maybe 6 weeks tops. This can often be reduced with the aid of a immigration lawyer. They are very cheap here so it might not be a bad investment but they do speak English at the immigration office here which helps smooth things out. As the other poster said, try to get a permanente visa if possible, cheaper in the long run but worst case you come in on a temporary. Bad side about that is that you can't buy a car with a temporary

A Residente Temporal can buy a vehicle, get a Mexican drivers license and join Mexican Socialized Medicine.

I stand corrected and thanks for setting me straight. My apologies to the OP for leading them astray. I went today to find out the real truth and was given this information for required documents:

1) Photo ID. This needs to be your passport
2) Immigration Visa
a) Temporary Visa – With proof of Address in buyers name (official receipt CFE, Telmex, Telcel, Mexican Bank statement)
(note: Jalisco will not accept a rental agreement with a Temporary Visa as Proof of Residence)
b) Permanent Visa – With proof of address in buyers name, or can use a rental agreement with proof of address in home owners name (in this case, must provide photo ID of home owner)
3) Proof of address in buyers name - CFE, Telmex or Mexican Bank Statement showing full address and no older than 60 days
4) CURP.  This number is issued by immigration and is found on your Temporary or Permanent Visa card
5) RFC – This is a tax number issued by SAT (Servicio de Administration Tributaria) and is easily obtained
6) Email address
7) Telephone number

Hi, I retired January 2018 and looking to relocate to Merida. I went to Mexican consulate here in Miami last week to start the process but was told I must wait 1 year after retirement to apply for permanent residency.....The rep told me they need to see 12 months of retirement pay stubs.

Prattd22 :

Hi, I retired January 2018 and looking to relocate to Merida. I went to Mexican consulate here in Miami last week to start the process but was told I must wait 1 year after retirement to apply for permanent residency.....The rep told me they need to see 12 months of retirement pay stubs.

12 months is not the norm. 6 months of proof of minimum monthly income is at most Mx. Consulates. Try another Mx. Consulate. If it were me I would apply for a Residente Temporal not a Residente Permanente as it will be easier to get approved. Good Luck

Okay thanks. I just want the 5 years to start because I know that i will be applying for citizenship.

"General Legal Affairs
Letter of naturalization by residence
This document is issued to foreigners who accredit a residence in national territory with the card issued by the Ministry of the Interior certifying the condition of temporary resident, or with the card proving the permanent resident status, at least during the last five years immediately prior to the date of its request, in accordance with the provisions of articles 20 of the Law of ...."

5 years on any INM resident visa/card.

This is a qoute from the SRE -  the Mexican state deparment's website.

https://sre.gob.mx/carta-de-naturalizac … residencia
Link to SRE WEBSITE mention above

Awesome....thanks so much. Very important info that is vital to me. Thanks Again

Would be interested in your experience yesterday at the Consulate in Denver for your visas.  We are getting ready to do the same and would like to hear about your experience.  Thanks!

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