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U.S. Citizenship for New Child Birth

My wife and I, you may have read on another thread, are expecting twins this April/May. In preparation I am trying to understand what will be required for their citizenship and social security support. I am a bit confused by the Consular Report of Birth Abroad reauirements, that says:

In order for a child/applicant to be documented as a U.S. citizen, all three of the essential requirements must be fulfilled.
1. Physical Presence/Residence in the United States
2. Legitimation/Legal Relationship
3. Blood Relationship (Filiation)

How can a baby birthed in the Philippines meet requirement number 1?

Any light or counsel someone might share would be most appreciated.

Wayve

Hi Wayve.  I went through the same question...well, at least my father did when he was dealing with the issue with regard to his Philippine-born children.   I was born (as well as my other siblings) in the Philippines.  My father, who was born in the Philippines of an American father (and Filipina mother) acquired U.S citizenship through his father.  Apparently, record shows that he registered us with the U.S Embassy in Manila as U.S. Citizens.  I read that same ruling you referred to...particularly item 1.  Now how can I meet that criteria when I haven't even step foot in U.S. before I was declared a U.S. Citizen?   Was I declared or did I became a U.S. Citizen at birth?   I was 10 years old when my father registered me with the U.S Embassy.  Was I a Filipino citizen before then?  My birth certificate says so.   But I do not possess the document that says, "on this day on, you are hereby declared a citizen of the United States."  All I know is that one day, my father handed me my U.S Passport and told me to pack my bags...I am going to America!   So this is what I suggest...
  Go straight to the proper authorities at the U.S Embassy in Manila, provide them a copy of your birth certificate and U.S passport....and your child/children's birth certificate,  ask them to explain the provisions of the applicable law and what you need to do to register them as U.S citizen(s).   Keep a copy of all relevant documents regarding the birth, citizenship of your child....this way they don't have to run into so much trouble later when they're older...proving how they came about becoming a U.S citizen. 
  Anyway, the officials at the U.S, Embassy in Manila will likely refer to another rule...as that particular one you read does not apply to you.   It's easier that way.   When your child's birth certificate is being prepared at the hospital, make sure you are present to supervise its preparation.  My father simply let the clerks fill out the my birth certificate...they filled it showing my father as a Filipino citizen. ...and me as well.   
   Wish you best of luck in what you are trying to achieve.

ElGatoNegron :

My wife and I, you may have read on another thread, are expecting twins this April/May. In preparation I am trying to understand what will be required for their citizenship and social security support. I am a bit confused by the Consular Report of Birth Abroad reauirements, that says:

In order for a child/applicant to be documented as a U.S. citizen, all three of the essential requirements must be fulfilled.
1. Physical Presence/Residence in the United States
2. Legitimation/Legal Relationship
3. Blood Relationship (Filiation)

How can a baby birthed in the Philippines meet requirement number 1?

Any light or counsel someone might share would be most appreciated.

Wayve

The first requirement refers to you, the American citizen parent.

Here's a link to the checklist: https://ph.usembassy.gov/wp-content/upl … anuary.pdf

For #1: your W2s, old passports, etc.
For #2: certified copy from NSO of your marriage certificate
For #3: your child's ultrasound photos; pictures of you and your wife before, during and after birth i.e. photos while you two were still dating, wedding photos, pics of you and your wife while she's pregnant, family photo at the hospital where she gave birth, and baby photos. (I put our submission photos is a small album and put stickers with dates when the photos were taken on the album sleeves.)

Use the official checklist from the embassy. The process is simple and quick at the embassy if you have all the requirements. If you want to apply for a passport for your child, fulfill also those requirements in the checklist. If you have time, you can also apply for an SS number for your child after getting the CRBA.

FCStraight :

Go straight to the proper authorities at the U.S Embassy in Manila, provide them a copy of your birth certificate and U.S passport....and your child/children's birth certificate,  ask them to explain the provisions of the applicable law and what you need to do to register them as U.S citizen(s).

No need to do this. Everything you need to provide is in the checklist in my previous post. Read everything thoroughly. There are portions in the forms that you should not sign, until after you submit the form and prompted to sign by the official at the embassy. Otherwise you will have to re-do the form.

Also, to avoid the trip to Manila (plane ride can be stressful to babies and their parents), you can ask  the consular office in Cebu if they can do the CRBA.

Hi good day. Has anyone recently been interviewed regarding CRBA application? How was the process so far? And what to do with the checklist #3 regarding the SOCIAL SECURITY NUMBER of Our little one

Just did it. The interview with the career diplomat was benign. He saw us after the staffer reviewd the application and supporting documents sith us. A few questions from the diplomat, a look at the babies and we were done. He was emgaging - I asked about his career. He is here for two years, then on to the next. His questions: Where did you meet? How long you lived together? Can I see the kids? Etc...

The staffers who preceeded were anal and by the book - stay in step, do as we told you, move along. I remember them well because I am a terrible “do as I tell you” person. Follow their direction to the T before you get there to hand in your paperwork. They will organize what is needed for you. Treat them well. Have ready (application submission and interview) more than they ask for. Lots of photos. Especially relationship photos, timelines and support affidavits. You might not need them, better to have and not need though.

Their citizenship status was received, as he told us it would be, granted within the month.

It is probable true, not all processes go the same.

Good luck

Wayne

Good job, Wayne.  Getting them a social security number should be easy enough.  Unless laws change, all USA citizens are required to file and pay income taxes on all of their world wide income, even if they have never been in the USA.  Could be an issue in 20 years, hope you enjoy them now.

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