Where meet people "my age"?

Lol,

I realize I sound like an old fart but I am a young 55 year old. And although I get along well with the younger crowds, I believe some of us men (and probably women too) never grow out of their 20'ies/30'ies, I do think I can have longer lasting relationships with people of my age if I meet them outside a disco or a crowded restaurant. So where do people meet in Budapest in their 50'ies? Not the attached ones, obviously, but the ones who are divorced, widowed, free-spirited? Should I take up yoga, swimming, or find a choir? Asking for a friend... ;)
/Pal

As "old married lady" I really can't say but it comes to logic that you have to be out there to be seen and to meet people.
It's best to do things you like doing and not fake it, like if you dislike yoga then don't force yourself just to maybe meet someone.
One thing to be aware of though or so I've heard from people is to be aware of people who wish to befreind you because they see you as a wallet.
My friend moved to Budapest with her father who was in his late 50's.
Women loved going out with him as long as the steak dinners kept coming.
After a while he just stopped trying to meet ladies.
It's best to be low key and not flashy or you will attract the wrong people into your life.
If you were able to meet people easily in your own turf then you shouldn't have too hard of a time here either.Just be yourself.

PalCabral wrote:

Lol,

I realize I sound like an old fart but I am a young 55 year old. And although I get along well with the younger crowds, I believe some of us men (and probably women too) never grow out of their 20'ies/30'ies, I do think I can have longer lasting relationships with people of my age if I meet them outside a disco or a crowded restaurant. So where do people meet in Budapest in their 50'ies? Not the attached ones, obviously, but the ones who are divorced, widowed, free-spirited? Should I take up yoga, swimming, or find a choir? Asking for a friend... ;)
/Pal

It's a tough question at any age. 

My own thoughts are to join some activity clubs - tennis, handball, canoeing, hiking, golf, cycling, sailing, football, dancing or whatever.   

It's a bit obvious to say it but shared experience helps bond people together. 

I've got a dog which I walk quite a lot on my own as my Mrs Fluffy is often much busier than me and not quite as keen to go out wandering the hills. The dog walking is as much for me for health purposes as much as the dog.    It's amazing to me how many people stop to talk while their dogs are sizing each other up.  And surprisingly many of them speak English.   I'm obviously not looking for anyone as I'm happily with Mrs F but the dog is a brilliant ice breaker.

I think there might be some weird shortage of single people in their slightly older years.   We know a few people ranging from 30 to 60 who are on their own and have been for some years usually after failed relationships.  Some of them have what I think are unrealistic expectations - like a 50 year old who wants to be with a 23 year old.  Might happen, might not, but someone in their 50s is more likely to be with someone of the same age.   

We tried to set up potential partners on blind dates but it's never worked out - so far!  Couple I know are using dating sites - not much happening on that front either.  People usually are set in their ways.

I'm reminded of the poem for the lonely by Irish comedian and author Spike Milligan - easy to remember.  Here it is:

"Hello"

;)

Marilyn Tassy wrote:

As "old married lady" I really can't say but it comes to logic that you have to be out there to be seen and to meet people.
It's best to do things you like doing and not fake it, like if you dislike yoga then don't force yourself just to maybe meet someone.
One thing to be aware of though or so I've heard from people is to be aware of people who wish to befreind you because they see you as a wallet.
My friend moved to Budapest with her father who was in his late 50's.
Women loved going out with him as long as the steak dinners kept coming.
After a while he just stopped trying to meet ladies.
It's best to be low key and not flashy or you will attract the wrong people into your life.
If you were able to meet people easily in your own turf then you shouldn't have too hard of a time here either.Just be yourself.

Very good points. No, I don't fancy myself doing yoga but I am open-minded enough to say that I wouldn't knock it if I haven't tried it.

fluffy2560 wrote:

My own thoughts are to join some activity clubs - tennis, handball, canoeing, hiking, golf, cycling, sailing, football, dancing or whatever.   

It's a bit obvious to say it but shared experience helps bond people together. 

I've got a dog which I walk quite a lot on my own as my Mrs Fluffy is often much busier than me and not quite as keen to go out wandering the hills. The dog walking is as much for me for health purposes as much as the dog.    It's amazing to me how many people stop to talk while their dogs are sizing each other up.  And surprisingly many of them speak English.   I'm obviously not looking for anyone as I'm happily with Mrs F but the dog is a brilliant ice breaker.

I think there might be some weird shortage of single people in their slightly older years.   We know a few people ranging from 30 to 60 who are on their own and have been for some years usually after failed relationships.  Some of them have what I think are unrealistic expectations - like a 50 year old who wants to be with a 23 year old.  Might happen, might not, but someone in their 50s is more likely to be with someone of the same age.   

We tried to set up potential partners on blind dates but it's never worked out - so far!  Couple I know are using dating sites - not much happening on that front either.  People usually are set in their ways.

I'm reminded of the poem for the lonely by Irish comedian and author Spike Milligan - easy to remember.  Here it is:

"Hello"

;)

I agree with your suggestions, but find that sports is generally great to meet people of your own sex but sometimes harder to meet someone from the other, but it's about what sport/activity it is, of course. I can see the dog being an ice breaker, very good point. I like to walk a lot myself, that's kind of my "hobby" so having a dog to keep my company wouldn't perhaps be such a bad thing. But I travel a lot so there's that side to it too. Blind dates are hard, I hate them, and my friends know not to even try. It's so awkward unless you're really up for it. I don't know if you remember the move "Blind date" with Bruce Willis and Kim Bassinger? One of my favorite movies. The date starts so well but ends so bad. "Whatever you do, don't give her alcohol".

I like societies where people can socialize across age groups. Latin countries are often like that, but it tends to be more within the families than with strangers. I have the impression that Hungary is also less fixated by age, but that could be a misconception. Scandinavia is on the other hand very divided socially when it comes to age groups. Anyways, thank you for you suggestions!

PalCabral wrote:
fluffy2560 wrote:

My own thoughts are to join some activity clubs - tennis, handball, canoeing, hiking, golf, cycling, sailing, football, dancing or whatever.   

It's a bit obvious to say it but shared experience helps bond people together. 

I've got a dog which I walk quite a lot on my own as my Mrs Fluffy is often much busier than me and not quite as keen to go out wandering the hills. The dog walking is as much for me for health purposes as much as the dog.    It's amazing to me how many people stop to talk while their dogs are sizing each other up.  And surprisingly many of them speak English.   I'm obviously not looking for anyone as I'm happily with Mrs F but the dog is a brilliant ice breaker.

I think there might be some weird shortage of single people in their slightly older years.   We know a few people ranging from 30 to 60 who are on their own and have been for some years usually after failed relationships.  Some of them have what I think are unrealistic expectations - like a 50 year old who wants to be with a 23 year old.  Might happen, might not, but someone in their 50s is more likely to be with someone of the same age.   

We tried to set up potential partners on blind dates but it's never worked out - so far!  Couple I know are using dating sites - not much happening on that front either.  People usually are set in their ways.

I'm reminded of the poem for the lonely by Irish comedian and author Spike Milligan - easy to remember.  Here it is:

"Hello"

;)

I agree with your suggestions, but find that sports is generally great to meet people of your own sex but sometimes harder to meet someone from the other, but it's about what sport/activity it is, of course. I can see the dog being an ice breaker, very good point. I like to walk a lot myself, that's kind of my "hobby" so having a dog to keep my company wouldn't perhaps be such a bad thing. But I travel a lot so there's that side to it too. Blind dates are hard, I hate them, and my friends know not to even try. It's so awkward unless you're really up for it. I don't know if you remember the move "Blind date" with Bruce Willis and Kim Bassinger? One of my favorite movies. The date starts so well but ends so bad. "Whatever you do, don't give her alcohol".

I like societies where people can socialize across age groups. Latin countries are often like that, but it tends to be more within the families than with strangers. I have the impression that Hungary is also less fixated by age, but that could be a misconception. Scandinavia is on the other hand very divided socially when it comes to age groups. Anyways, thank you for you suggestions!

Depends what you are doing.  Obviously more ladies will like dancing than hang gliding but you never know.  One of my 30 something daughters has joined a canoe club.  Who'd have thought? And good for her!  She is already in a scuba diving club.  She likes outdoor pursuits so shouldn't really be a surprise to me.

You can always borrow a dog.  That goes on around here.  People borrow our dog.  I've just been walking my dog and there were a few women out with their hounds.   Most of them jogging in lycra or just walking the canines.

If we're quoting romantic movies, I'll raise you Pretty Woman!

Don't know much about Latin countries but weird stuff comes out all over.

Mrs F and I checked out a nurse in her early 40s for a blind date for someone.  The nurse brought her mother along.   Jeez, really?   WTF?

I also had a blind date with someone years ago who spent most of her time chain smoking roll up cigarettes and swilling down beer.  She had a fearsome set of gnashers which I am sure would have been equally  at home ripping the tops of the aforementioned beer bottles.   And she wasn't that charming or fun - a sort of rock chick without a bike. 

Needless to say it didn't go further.  But I did. To here.

I haven't dated since I was a teenager.
Met my husband when I was 19.
He often tells me that if he had understod half of what I was talking about back then, he would of run away.
His way of being a smarty pants, his English was really , really bad when we met but we had,"chemistry".
He is 7 years my senior and I've always sort of liked talking to experienced older peple, always had older friends. Guess having older siblings you learn to adapt to more mature people to be excepted?
My husband and I used to take a elderly neighbor t senir dances in Hungary.
What a trip those were. Sme 90 year old men had mre energy then your average teenager, at least they moved on the dance floor.
My husband and I were ,"Youngsters" at these dances, we tok our neighbor for something different to do once in awhile plus that was the only place she could meet her 86 year old BF without their children knowing. She had to sneak around to see her man on the side!
Families here really do get in your business.
There used to be many free music events in Budapest, almost every weekend in the summertime but since C-19 it's sort of just a memory now.
Used to have a fun beer garten located in the city park where cover bands would play on weekeknds and they had a dance floor and a bar.
For say $10. you could have a night of it, the cost of a couple beers and a tip.
All ages would go dance and hear the music.
Some bands were rather decent too, a Beatles cover band, Stones, Pink Floyd and such.
I meet peple where ever I go, a real pain for my husband.
I have no problem striking up a cnversation with just about anyone. Think that's a big reason my husband isn't into teaching me Hungarian. He is afraid I'll just come off as a crazy lady talking to everyone.
Just be open but also be on your gaurd, again hate to keep saying it but sme not all peple will want something from you, drinks, a meal or whatever and I always help a freind but not everyone is looking fr a freind, more like a chump.
My son came here with us when he was 20 or so. We visited an old friends ex-wife and daughter. The girl was my son's age and she invited him out with her friends.
Turned out they just wanted someone to pay their bar tab.
Sometimes people think you are frm a rich country so you must be rich as well.

Marilyn Tassy wrote:

I haven't dated since I was a teenager.
Met my husband when I was 19.
He often tells me that if he had understod half of what I was talking about back then, he would of run away.
His way of being a smarty pants, his English was really , really bad when we met but we had,"chemistry".
He is 7 years my senior and I've always sort of liked talking to experienced older peple, always had older friends. Guess having older siblings you learn to adapt to more mature people to be excepted?
My husband and I used to take a elderly neighbor t senir dances in Hungary.
What a trip those were. Sme 90 year old men had mre energy then your average teenager, at least they moved on the dance floor.
My husband and I were ,"Youngsters" at these dances, we tok our neighbor for something different to do once in awhile plus that was the only place she could meet her 86 year old BF without their children knowing. She had to sneak around to see her man on the side!
Families here really do get in your business.
There used to be many free music events in Budapest, almost every weekend in the summertime but since C-19 it's sort of just a memory now.
Used to have a fun beer garten located in the city park where cover bands would play on weekeknds and they had a dance floor and a bar.
For say $10. you could have a night of it, the cost of a couple beers and a tip.
All ages would go dance and hear the music.
Some bands were rather decent too, a Beatles cover band, Stones, Pink Floyd and such.
I meet peple where ever I go, a real pain for my husband.
I have no problem striking up a cnversation with just about anyone. Think that's a big reason my husband isn't into teaching me Hungarian. He is afraid I'll just come off as a crazy lady talking to everyone.
Just be open but also be on your gaurd, again hate to keep saying it but sme not all peple will want something from you, drinks, a meal or whatever and I always help a freind but not everyone is looking fr a freind, more like a chump.
My son came here with us when he was 20 or so. We visited an old friends ex-wife and daughter. The girl was my son's age and she invited him out with her friends.
Turned out they just wanted someone to pay their bar tab.
Sometimes people think you are frm a rich country so you must be rich as well.

The story of the elderly neighbor is fabulous. Shows you and your hubby have good hearts.

I am like you when it comes to speaking to people. I'm really not shy, mainly because I think people are interesting, and perhaps I believe I have something interesting to bring to the table too? I strike up conversations with people all the time, and I don't let petty things like language get in my way either. But I do know that in some cultures that's not considered normal, but where I come from, northern Norway, we're a chatty bunch, maybe because there are so few of us and we're far apart? I feel good when I interact with people and I hope I provide some of that back.

Yeah, it's the second time you warned me about being a sucker. Don't misunderstand me, I appreciate your concern. I like to think I am a good judge of character and I usually have "breaks" in place before I really trust someone. At the same time, I've been in places where my rather small "wealth" has been huge in comparison to the locals, and where I have allowed myself to be suckered in as a "meal-ticket" just because it allowed me an entrance to a world I wouldn't have been able to access on my own, for a relatively affordable price. We're talking Mexico, Cuba, Chile, Morocco here. As long as we're not talking hundreds of dollars/euros, a dinner and a couple of drinks drinks is a cheap way to learn to know people and find out more about them, I think. What I mean to say is that as long as you know and can afford being taken on a ride, you may actually enjoy the experience and scenery of the ride itself. And just to be crystal clear, it's a tricky subject and easy to misinterpret me perhaps, I do not mean taking advantage of people because I have the financial upper hand. Not at all. I just want to be able to be with them.

Tell you a story of my first time in Hungary/Budapest. It was 1987 and it was the grim times. However, having been to many of the Eastern block countries, I actually believe Hungary was the best of them. There were things to buy in Hungary, there were vegetables and food, the stores had goods and there were restaurants where the menus did not have everything except the beet soup stricken out. After 3-4 days in Budapest, we took the train to Romania. We shared the compartment with a group of young Hungarians, our age, early twenty something. They had filled their bags with goods to sell: jeans, jackets, kitchen stuff. At the first station across the border. well over midnight, the train was flooded with Romanians trying to buy anything they could get their hands on. Our Hungarian friends financed their entire trip to Romania this way, because Romania was the opposite of Hungary in those days, they had nothing there, nothing. I obviously wished I had known this. I had loads of old clothes at home I didn't use and that I easily could have switched for the Romanian god awful currency. But I didn't have access to people in Hungary at that time, too many barriers, there was just no way information about how to finance your vacation in Romania would reach me. Not sure exactly how this story ties up with what I said earlier, sometimes I just say things that I think is related and thinking about afterwards I fail to remember the connection ;)

/Pal

Yes, my first visit to Hungary was in 1978 then again in 1986.
First time here my husband brought an extra suitcase full  of Levi jeans , any style, size he could find.
I asked what the heck and he said he would be giving these jeans as gifts because someone would know someone who wanted them.
I was 23 my first time here, had our 2 1/2 year old baby boy in tow.
We came because we wanted my MIL to see her, "American" grandson and it had been over 7 years since my husband left Hungary.
My husband of course brought gifts for everyone and told me to bring as many outfits that I wanted to for the 6 weeks we were here. ( I realized later he probably wanted to show me off as his Ameircan wife and that he was doing well in the US)
Most of the time I was in my MIL house or close to her country house and had no need of all the clothing I had brought over.
Boots for this outfit, jackets with this skirt, I brough so many things that we had 6 suitcases and 3 carry ons for that short time here.
What a waste because everytime I dressed up to go out everyone was just staring at me like I landed from Mars.I was embarrassed and in the end just wore 2 simple outfits over and over again.
I know we have been to places like Mexico and Belize in the past, not a big deal to over pay here and ther just finding true friends that don't care about money can sometimes be hard.
My old school mate friends I know had some money but we never in 50 years every even talked about money.
We were too busy laughing to discuss real world issues. ( well at least not personal money issues)
Sadly they have passed in these last 2 years but not much one can do about that.
My husband arrived in the US with like $5. in his pocket years later he was hiring Ameircans to work for him.
Up and down times are just part of life.
I have met in the past people on the st. here in Budapest, mostly they were walking their dogs.
Used to chat almost daily on my way to the gym here to a elderly Hungarian man who was in his 80's. He had a Doberman and I just told him his dog was nice. Turns out he spoke perfect English and had taught at a uni in the USA. Nice man always friendly and I got to pet his dog every morning.
Guess a dog is a good ice breaker after all.

Marilyn Tassy wrote:

....
I have met in the past people on the st. here in Budapest, mostly they were walking their dogs.
Used to chat almost daily on my way to the gym here to a elderly Hungarian man who was in his 80's. He had a Doberman and I just told him his dog was nice. Turns out he spoke perfect English and had taught at a uni in the USA. Nice man always friendly and I got to pet his dog every morning.
Guess a dog is a good ice breaker after all.

It's a surprising thing to me that it seems dogs are very good for a chat.   Then there's there's always the dog school which would involve more interaction.   

Here, they are opening an indoor "dog school" or "playground" in a brand new building on the industrial area.  I have no idea if they would make money doing it.  Paying say 2K HUF a session with the dog there or simply walking in the forest for free, I think I know which I would prefer.

I sort of hate and love our dog.  She forces me to do stuff like walking regularly which I'm not entirely a fan of but when we do it, I find it's for good for me afterwards.  I've noticed it's making me fitter and I've lost some weight doing it.  But we have to have purpose when we're out.  Like something to entertain me as much as her.  If we don't, it's very boring.   She must be able to run off the lead otherwise it's totally pointless.

Last week, we went to Lajos Forras spring near Pomaz/Szentendre.   There are some nice hilly doggy walks around there including a nice new viewing tower with good views of Budapest in the distance.   The road up there is rough so proceed with caution.  I can recommend the water - it's absolutely pure and  tastes great.  Take quite a few empty bottles!    Lots of people there collecting water.  Something for us and something for the doggy.

I used to walk my sisters Great Dane and Black Lab at the same time when I was spending school summers at her place.
Most people in Hollywod that walked were put off and crossed the st.rather then pass us.
I's always get some guy yelling at me, "What? You think I'm afraid"? So silly since it was obvius they crossed over and away.

Good protection dogs...
Had similar experiences when I walked my Doberman, most people were afraid to get too close.
Personally I don't usually bother to chat anyone because of just any old dog, has to be a breed that attracts my interest.
Usually large working dogs or hunting dogs. I do find mini-pinnies rather cute though.
My mother, God rest her, used to freak out all the time because I had a Doberman, she always said why didn't you get a ,"girly" dog, something cute and cuddly?
I'd tell her because I'm not cute and cuddly.
I hate to say it but nothing is funnier to me then a big dude with a tiny little dog.

Marilyn Tassy wrote:

I used to walk my sisters Great Dane and Black Lab at the same time when I was spending school summers at her place.
Most people in Hollywod that walked were put off and crossed the st.rather then pass us.
I's always get some guy yelling at me, "What? You think I'm afraid"? So silly since it was obvius they crossed over and away.

Good protection dogs...
Had similar experiences when I walked my Doberman, most people were afraid to get too close.
Personally I don't usually bother to chat anyone because of just any old dog, has to be a breed that attracts my interest.
Usually large working dogs or hunting dogs. I do find mini-pinnies rather cute though.
My mother, God rest her, used to freak out all the time because I had a Doberman, she always said why didn't you get a ,"girly" dog, something cute and cuddly?
I'd tell her because I'm not cute and cuddly.
I hate to say it but nothing is funnier to me then a big dude with a tiny little dog.

I dunno, my thinking is that protection dogs aren't really needed here.  It's like carrying a weapon or a large bat.   Our dog weighs 40kg.  Unlikely however to get into a fight as it's not her thing.

When our doggy interacts with other dogs, it seems to be unrelated to the breed but interest of the smell of the dog or just curiousity. I just let her get on with it.  She'll back down immediately if the other dog is aggressive.  I just walk away and eventually she'll get bored and run back to me.

I have tried to see if she has more interest in GRs (Golden Retrievers) than other dogs and I think that's quite possible.  Bit strange as I don't think dogs can recognise each other or themselves in a mirror.

A good smallish dog might be a cockapoo.  My bro has one and it's very friendly, relatively intelligent and importantly, doesn't shed hair.

My mother had a Cockapoo that one of her friends gave her.
The poor boy was so nervous all the time he would pee inside the house.
My mom was always yelling at it to go outside which made him lose it even more.
He could however dance on his hind legs , like an Irish Jig.
It ran away one day, my half brained half sister saw it but was unable to catch him , think he ran for his life actually, far away from the crazy house. He saw my half sis and ran the other direction.
He has belonged to a quiet elderly lady and being dumped into a noisy house with teenagers and party people was too much for the poor thing.
Some other time one of mom's friends passed and she was given the women's dog. A tiny Chiwawa. another poor little thing that didn't belong in a wild house with teenagers.
Think that guy lasted a month or two before mom found him another home.
Mom wasn't crazy about that breed, too nervous and always shaking, well I'd shake too if I was him, the house was too much action all the time.
Our mixed breed family dog lived 17 years but he grew up in the mad house and got used to it.

Marilyn Tassy wrote:

My mother had a Cockapoo that one of her friends gave her.
The poor boy was so nervous all the time he would pee inside the house.
My mom was always yelling at it to go outside which made him lose it even more.
He could however dance on his hind legs , like an Irish Jig.
It ran away one day, my half brained half sister saw it but was unable to catch him , think he ran for his life actually, far away from the crazy house. He saw my half sis and ran the other direction.
He has belonged to a quiet elderly lady and being dumped into a noisy house with teenagers and party people was too much for the poor thing.
Some other time one of mom's friends passed and she was given the women's dog. A tiny Chiwawa. another poor little thing that didn't belong in a wild house with teenagers.
Think that guy lasted a month or two before mom found him another home.
Mom wasn't crazy about that breed, too nervous and always shaking, well I'd shake too if I was him, the house was too much action all the time.
Our mixed breed family dog lived 17 years but he grew up in the mad house and got used to it.

My bro inherited his cockapoo (or was it a cavapoo?) and it came from a very quiet house - just a couple and occasionally their adult student daughter.   The guy got dementia and some other condition and could fall over the dog so it had to go really - always around their feet I suppose.  I would have thought the dog was a good companion for a dementia person who still had mobility.  Non-judgemental and simple thing for a simpler life with  dementia.   

My bro and his better half had looked after it numerous times so they seemed the perfect choice for a new home.  The dog has settled in well.  Thinks it's just on holiday.  It'll adapt anyway and I expect it'll forget quickly enough. 

Cats and dogs are really rather disloyal. I think it's all about food - they love whoever it is who feeds it.

How this thread turned into a dog thread I don't know  :D  You guys need to get out more, or maybe you should stay in more?  ;) I am personally more of a cat person but try going out with a cat. For 5 minutes they are standing in one single spot smelling a flower and the next they're down the street like a rocket chasing a fly or a moth.

I guess what we are saying though is that it is 1) good to get out and 2) it's good to socialize, even if it is the dog that makes us socialize?

Sticking to the former point, which is why I started the thread, I just found a group on Facebook called International Meeting Point who are organizing meets in Budapest for expats and locals. You guys have any experience of this group?

Another thing, do you think there would be any interest for someone teaching Norwegian, Swedish, Danish or Portuguese (yeah, try to find the odd one out) in Hungary? Not that I actually consider myself a "teacher" I do know a lot of languages and the nordic ones are super easy for me.

PalCabral wrote:

How this thread turned into a dog thread I don't know  :D  You guys need to get out more, or maybe you should stay in more?  ;) I am personally more of a cat person but try going out with a cat. For 5 minutes they are standing in one single spot smelling a flower and the next they're down the street like a rocket chasing a fly or a moth.

I guess what we are saying though is that it is 1) good to get out and 2) it's good to socialize, even if it is the dog that makes us socialize?

Sticking to the former point, which is why I started the thread, I just found a group on Facebook called International Meeting Point who are organizing meets in Budapest for expats and locals. You guys have any experience of this group?

Another thing, do you think there would be any interest for someone teaching Norwegian, Swedish, Danish or Portuguese (yeah, try to find the odd one out) in Hungary? Not that I actually consider myself a "teacher" I do know a lot of languages and the nordic ones are super easy for me.

I'm guilty of hijacking the thread to discuss dogs as a mechanism for social interaction.   That's my excuse.   I freely admit it.  I'm afraid this is what happens here.  There's the Absolutely Anything Else thread where this sort of discussion is not off-topic. 

BTW, at the Lajos-Forras spring, I saw a cat on a lead.  Someone was taking it for a walk. It is possible.    Personally I think cats are completely stupid animals.  Our cat is an idiot that's hungry all the time.  A dog at least can follow instructions.

Sounds good teaching people languages but I suppose Swedish, Danish and Norwegian are very similar. Hereabouts it used to be German as a second language  with English of course as the  lingua franca.   I guess if you know German, it'd be possible to learn Swedish relatively easily - I noticed some commonality.   Dutch is even easier and a good stepping stone to German.  My kids are learning Spanish and German in school.

None of this answers your question really.  It's mostly random nonsense.

fluffy2560 wrote:

I'm guilty of hijacking the thread to discuss dogs as a mechanism for social interaction.   That's my excuse.   I freely admit it.  I'm afraid this is what happens here.  There's the Absolutely Anything Else thread where this sort of discussion is not off-topic. 

BTW, at the Lajos-Forras spring, I saw a cat on a lead.  Someone was taking it for a walk. It is possible.    Personally I think cats are completely stupid animals.  Our cat is an idiot that's hungry all the time.  A dog at least can follow instructions.

Sounds good teaching people languages but I suppose Swedish, Danish and Norwegian are very similar. Hereabouts it used to be German as a second language  with English of course as the  lingua franca.   I guess if you know German, it'd be possible to learn Swedish relatively easily - I noticed some commonality.   Dutch is even easier and a good stepping stone to German.  My kids are learning Spanish and German in school.

None of this answers your question really.  It's mostly random nonsense.

Yes, German is in the same ballpark as the Scandinavian languages so I picked it up quite easily. Well... I butcher the grammar pretty violently but I tend to make myself understood. I only had two years studying it in school but once in Germany it tends to come back. I had 6 years of French and I'm a lot weaker in that language. But I've lived a total of 5 years in Brussels and so I got a chance to practice my school French and so I get by in French too, todler-level French  :lol:

I checked the map for Lajos-Forras. That's quite a hike from the city. I guess you drive there and then walk, right? Looks very pretty. I love living somewhere where the nature isn't that far away. As I mentioned, taking walks is my thing and I love a good walk out in the nature.

PalCabral wrote:

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I checked the map for Lajos-Forras. That's quite a hike from the city. I guess you drive there and then walk, right? Looks very pretty. I love living somewhere where the nature isn't that far away. As I mentioned, taking walks is my thing and I love a good walk out in the nature.

It is quite a way to Lajos Forras although it's easy to get to Szentendre via the HEV suburban railway and find a way from there. 

I wouldn't walk up the hill to the spring. I'd drive up there as Mrs F and kids wouldn't do it.   Dog is up for anything of course.  There's supposedly a route from Pomaz but I haven't tried it.  There's not much there except a very run down and derelict Turistahaz.  Still, it's nice in the hills.  Lajos Forras is a once in a while trip.  Mrs F hadn't been there and was impressed by the water.  Remarkably fresh and cool even on a hot day. And straight out the mountain.

I usually go around where I live.  We're off to the hills supposedly to take La Doggia on her walkies.  We usually do 3 to 5 km per trip.   But I've just noticed it's raining so we're halted temporarily. 

If you have an Android phone, download the FREE HUMap walking application. It shows all the paths in the hills in the country and uses the GPS in the phone to show you where you are.  I use it all the time when we're investigating a new route.

An easy "city walk is to get to the start of the cogwheel railway, take it up (uses BKK/BKV tickets), walk across to Normafa through the forest and take the chair lift or children's railway down (or walk) (extra tickets, not BKV/BKK) and then get the bus (or tram) back to the start.

Unfortunately you need a muzzle for the dog on the cogwheel railway and there's no way to transport the dog on the chairlift.  I expect same rules on the children's railway.

PalCabral wrote:

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Yes, German is in the same ballpark as the Scandinavian languages so I picked it up quite easily. Well... I butcher the grammar pretty violently but I tend to make myself understood. I only had two years studying it in school but once in Germany it tends to come back. I had 6 years of French and I'm a lot weaker in that language. But I've lived a total of 5 years in Brussels and so I got a chance to practice my school French and so I get by in French too, todler-level French  :lol:

I used to think my school French was OK but now I'm watching French speaking movies/TV shows on Netflix and I understand very little.  I suppose it was 46 years ago I learnt French in school.  I get snippets when they are speaking.  I would prefer to learn Spanish but so many common words I can get the gist sometimes anyway.  My bro was a fluent Spanish speaker - he lived in Venezuela and Spain for some years.

We put the English subtitles on and always listen to the original sound track. 

What I'd really like is the ability to show two or more sets of subtitles at once - original language and English and perhaps Hungarian.  I lived in The Netherlands for some years and the subtitling of their TV output was a fantastic learning aid for me.  If I could see the original language subtitles and the English language ones it'd really be useful as a learning experience. 

Now my ears ain't so good so I like subtitles anyway - all the time - even if it's in English.

fluffy2560 wrote:

I used to think my school French was OK but now I'm watching French speaking movies/TV shows on Netflix and I understand very little.  I suppose it was 46 years ago I learnt French in school.  I get snippets when they are speaking.  I would prefer to learn Spanish but so many common words I can get the gist sometimes anyway.  My bro was a fluent Spanish speaker - he lived in Venezuela and Spain for some years.

We put the English subtitles on and always listen to the original sound track. 

What I'd really like is the ability to show two or more sets of subtitles at once - original language and English and perhaps Hungarian.  I lived in The Netherlands for some years and the subtitling of their TV output was a fantastic learning aid for me.  If I could see the original language subtitles and the English language ones it'd really be useful as a learning experience. 

Now my ears ain't so good so I like subtitles anyway - all the time - even if it's in English.

For reasons I know a lot of Portuguese. Before I learned it I knew some Spanish. The two are like Norwegian and Swedish, the same words but pronounced differently and then the odd curveball where the same word means something totally different in the two languages. Funny thing is, the Portuguse all know English well, everyone born after 1965 had it as their first foreign language. They speak English really well. The Spanish don't! Even they've had English in school too they're awful speaking it. Why? Because they dub everything on TV to Spanish and so they never hear English, or any other language, spoken. In Portugal they don't, they always subtitle in Portuguese and leave the original language be. The Germans and the French had the same problem but nowadays they are actually quite good in English.

I know a lot of people are worried that we all will speak English soon, forgetting our original languages but I don't believe it. The human brain is fully capable of speaking multiple languages and separate them. As I said, I've spent a lot of time in Brussels and I am so impressed with the Belgians being able to switch from French to Flemish from one sentence to another. That's two very different languages, one latin, the other germanic, still they can handle it. It's about respect, I think, the willingness to extend to someone else language to understand them. I like to think that.

PalCabral wrote:

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For reasons I know a lot of Portuguese. Before I learned it I knew some Spanish. The two are like Norwegian and Swedish, the same words but pronounced differently and then the odd curveball where the same word means something totally different in the two languages. Funny thing is, the Portuguse all know English well, everyone born after 1965 had it as their first foreign language. They speak English really well. The Spanish don't! Even they've had English in school too they're awful speaking it. Why? Because they dub everything on TV to Spanish and so they never hear English, or any other language, spoken. In Portugal they don't, they always subtitle in Portuguese and leave the original language be. The Germans and the French had the same problem but nowadays they are actually quite good in English.

I know a lot of people are worried that we all will speak English soon, forgetting our original languages but I don't believe it. The human brain is fully capable of speaking multiple languages and separate them. As I said, I've spent a lot of time in Brussels and I am so impressed with the Belgians being able to switch from French to Flemish from one sentence to another. That's two very different languages, one latin, the other germanic, still they can handle it. It's about respect, I think, the willingness to extend to someone else language to understand them. I like to think that.

Belgians have to learn their national languages from year dot plus English.  It surprised me - dealing with a Belgian group once - that things had deteriorated between the language speakers there because of politics.  One guy told me his son couldn't speak French to any level as his family were Flemish (i.e. Dutch) speakers.  They preferred to talk in English to other groups.  Perhaps that was just neutral and considered non-nationalistic.    That sort of nationalistic thing goes on here but it's really shooting yourself in the foot economically not to encourage language skills and trying to dumb down your population.  I believe university students here have to take at least one language whatever subject they are studying. 

Obviously my kids will be OK here as they are speaking both English and Hungarian (and at least one other - either Spanish and German).  My daughter's friend speaks pretty good English as well -  I think it's exposure to the Internet.  All that TikTok, Instagram and so on. 

Language switching is called "code switching".  My kids do it - they stick in English words in the middle of Hungarian sentences. It's common here in the Fluffy family to use Hunglish here and there!  In an interesting development over the years is the use of Hunglish jokey statements - using the meaning or pronunciation or spelling of a HU word in say a funny English sentence and vice versa.

I cannot see local languages being usurped by English.  I think it'll just merge over 100s of years.  When I lived in NL, their attitude was Dutch - language of culture, English - language of commerce.   As always with the Dutch a very practical answer.  Always admired their pragmatism.

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