Signing out of a krankenkasse

Hi,

So i was working for deutsche post over the summer and as i wasnt a student unlike a year ago my employer was obliged by law to register me in a krankenkasse. Now that my contract has come to an end on the 28th do I need to inform my insurance company that I've moved back to my home country or does my employer inform them that my contract is over and I have no further obligations towards them. It's strange because most people seem to suggest that I need to present the Abmeldung certificate to them. But in my case, for one I didnt even register at the burgersamt (coz my contract lasted less than 90 days) and secondly  I ignored all the letters they gave to me (coz I wasnt planning on going to the doctor) so I didn't set up an account, get my card and I have no real good way to contact them. Do they even have my data if I didn't give it to them so they can forget about me and I can live peacefully without any unpleasant receipts in the future?

Thanks so much if you have any knowledge on this.

Wow! Like people have suggested, the correct way is to send them a copy of a  Abmeldung form with a letter informing them of the details. But you were required to register within 2 weeks of arrival in Germany and from what you write it sounds like you failed to do so.

And if you were a student before the job, you should have registered your residency already.

Sounds unlikely you ever got properly accepted into the health care system without having registered or completing any of the paperwork. An employer is required to pay half of one's health insurance but you and not they are the ones who have to register! Not how it works. And as a student you were also required to get insured and could likely have stayed on with the same provider if you had informed them of your changed status. Were you insured as a student?

I can't make definite evaluations of your situation with the information given but it sounds like you have made a  mess of things.

You were possibly uninsured which is a second violation of the law. Hope you don't plan to return to Germany in the future because you might have just burned your bridges with such behavior. Even a citizen of another Schengen country has to obey the laws even if they don't need a visa to work or study.

And a rationalization like you didn't plan to use coverage is baffling. Who plans on having an accident? But when one lands in the hospital they can not use such excuses.

Why would one choose to be in such a compromising illegal status? To save a few Euros by not paying your share of the insurance coverage? Likely you are actually liable to pay what would have been charged during your entire time in Germany.

And as a side matter one has to wonder about a Pole named Hernadez, if that is really your name. Curious as to the backstory of that.

TominStuttgart wrote:

I can't make definite evaluations of your situation with the information given but it sounds like you have made a  mess of things.


THAT!!!
Everybody living in Germany must have health insurance at any time.
If you were student before this job (which your post indicates), you were supposed to have one at a subsidized rate. If you somehow got away with not registering with one, you can still be backcharged once an insurer finds this out and forces you to register. This can even be done several years afterwards, so don't tell anyone that you were student before!
And once you worked, you were supposed to have health insurance, too. The employer must have reminded you of this several times, before they were (by law) required to register you with a health insurance of their choice and pay them the compulsory fees (half of which they pay, the other half deducted from your pay - check your payslip!).
The insurance does automatically continue after the job ends and then you alone are liable for both halfs of the fee. You need to terminate it - by showing your de-registration as proof that you left the country. If you don't terminate, you owe them the fees indefinitely, as they are not allowed to throw you out (nobody can under any circumstance lose health insurance cover in Germany!).
You also had to register your residence within a week of moving in - with a fine up to €5000 for violating this rule.

What is your way out now?
- If you left the EU and intend to never return, leave the bridges burnt and do nothing.
- If not (because they will chase you within the EU for the charges!), you must go to your local town hall and register retroactively - explain to them that you didn't know or didn't understand this requirement, apologize and hope for their leniency (sometimes people get away with no or a very small fine!). Then de-register immediately and keep that sheet of paper!
Find out from your employer which health insurer you are member of, then send them the de-registration paper (you can do that up to three months retroactively).
Remember that you owe them (and thus have to pay) the fees from your last day of work until you de-registered. You could have avoided that by registering as unemployed (in which case the government pays your health insurance) - but that cannot be done retroactively, so you lost the chance!

wow, that was not my intention at all. What I assumed my employer paid (It was taken out of my gesamtbrutto salary so in reality I paid for it) as shown in my Abrechnung is all I needed to pay. They specifically wrote to me that my employer registered me with them in a krankenkasse and I assumed all I needed to do was to provide them with some more information in case eg.  I wanted to get coverage for my dependants who i dont have or get a card issued in case I wanted to visit a doctor. They didn't warn me about consequences of failing to do that - i was already registered. I assumed I was already in their system and they never asked for additional money to be paid. As for Anmeldung - for kurzbeschaftigung <90 days various sources told me I do not need it. One thing also - I was a student in Poland 2 months prior to my employment and I wanted to resume it come October. All I did in Germany was a 2 months gig at DP. What a debacle.

my small brain is confused again - they took away 590 eur from my salary in the form of all kind of Beitrage and 400 eur in Lohnsteuer. Is that the part my employer paid or I paid (it was taken out of my gesamtbrutto total so i could make cases for both)? Also - anmeldung in burgersamt - there's a rule im sure it exists that if you are employed for less than 90 days (seasonal work etc) you dont need to have an anmeldung. Can you verify it?

"Steuer" (=tax) is not the same as health insurance premium (="Krankenkassenbeitrag").
And as short-term worker from an EU country, you don't need to be registered for social security (but it seems your employer did that anyway), but that is different from registering your residence (which is still required).
In future assume less and ask more!

I really would like  to solve this issue without visiting the burgersamt. If I travelled to one of their branches in Berlin with all the paperwork  would I be able solve all this mess in one day. Ive just signed a 1 year rent agreement in Poland, maybe that will do instead of obtaining the Abmeldung certificate.

You can of course contact the health insurer to ask what other proof they accept (showing that you left Germany permanently).
Just a rental contract will not suffice - after all, you could be commuting between the countries.

Ron Hernandez wrote:

Hi,

But in my case, for one I didnt even register at the burgersamt (coz my contract lasted less than 90 days) and secondly  I ignored all the letters they gave to me (coz I wasnt planning on going to the doctor) so I didn't set up an account, get my card and I have no real good way to contact them.


This is what stands out for me. I am still confused on some of the details but to simply ignore the communications about what one is supposed to do is asking for trouble. And like Beppi mentioned, one has to register their address, the 90 exception is on getting covered under the local social security system, not the same thing.

I contacted my krankenkasse and they said that once my employer informs them of the ending of my employment they will retroactively cancel my insurance on the day when I was no longer employed. Thanks for the replies.

Ron Hernandez wrote:

I contacted my krankenkasse and they said that once my employer informs them of the ending of my employment they will retroactively cancel my insurance on the day when I was no longer employed. Thanks for the replies.


Sounds like you were somehow registered with them after all. Curious if all payments due were made; if so then it sounds like you have that problem taken care of.