Commuting to Sao Paulo City from the South East Coast

I took my current job a little under 3 years ago leaving the UK with my ideal vision of life, living beside the beach enjoying the Brazilian culture, one step closer to paradise. Except I have been living in the city centre of Sao Paulo ever since and only get out to the beach every now and then and not nearly as much as I would like. In a moment of lockdown lucidity I have been considering transforming my work / life routine. I reckon I can get my boss to agree to me working from home for a few days a week and in the office for the rest. That would mean I could consider living out of town along the São Sebastião coast, It would mean I would have to make possibly two return trips a week to the city and stay over night for work with friends or airbnb etc. But at the first opportunity drive back to Camburi which on a good day (I am told) takes around 2.30hrs drive. Do you think this is possible without to much stress? Obviously paying for a nice comfy car is a must!
Jay

You just reminded me my difficulties when I was doing my postgraduate studies. I would say it´s a little stressful. That´s a 5- hour round trip 2x a week - on a good day? How about on a bad day of congested traffic like summertime? And don´t forget driving while very tired and sleepy. Brazil is global number 1 in traffic accidents!

robal

Hi Robal, haha, the things we put ourselves through as students! Where was that - the states? I was speaking to an old professor here in S.P. he used to drive out to Camburi in the late 80's from Sao Paulo city when the road was just an old dirt road heading out into the middle of nowhere, lots have changed since then.. I have had a rethink, and realistically it makes more sense for me to stay in the city during weekdays and work towards having a weekend bolt hole beside the beach, for now, this makes far more sense.
So my next question is about cars and damn they look expensive! I kid you not but my car back in the UK, a Japanese Honda import, over here costs ten times the price second hand, that's a 1000% mark up! What model do you guys recommend to invest in?  Whats a good buy here in Brazil? reasonably well priced, reliable, nice to drive, etc ? ? Any suggestions welcome!

Most imports have close to 60% taxes. (This includes some built in BR.)
Many are not reliable, even new.
Purchased a new Ford, have so many problems. Since you are in a large city you have access to better dealers. Here we have dealers, but only a small inventory. Many parts have to be ordered.
VW is expensive and was reliable, but many here switched due to price and service. Most imports are assembled here, but parts are a high cost for dealers to have on hand, so they order.
Well priced, reliable, and nice to drive is a personal thing. Think fuel consumption a top issue.
What was your driver in the UK?

Hi Texanbrazil, thanks for the advice, shame about the VW these were a good choice to go for in the UK. I guess what would help me is to understand a little of what is necessary from a car using it as a weekend driver in and out of the city? Sao Paulo roads are unlike anything I'm familiar with in Europe, so presumably something with good suspension helps, but not necessarily 4X4 right? And then there is the downpours, something else to consider when purchasing a car. And  in the UK I was used to going for vehicles running on Unleaded, over here whats the go to fuel?  AC has never been an issue for me, I prefer it natural.. My last car was a convertible (Honda CRX Del Sol), I needed to make the most of all the sunlight I could living in England!

Good suspension is a must. As to a 4X4, only gets you stuck far off a road.
Sis in law had the CRX and was good,  but never keeps a car longer than 3 years. (I should have bought is, but did not need extra ins & tax payments)
As to roads. A lot better From Curitiba eastward. Have a place in Curitiba and I thought I could drive to back and forth. Well once was enough. Had rough road, blow out, and took 12 hours, so we fly.
I believe you should think about a/c. It can get hot and in SP stop & go traffic you may need it.
I am a truck guy, but gasoline too high. With all these "speed bumps" and "potholes, need as much clearance as you can get.
Many run ethanol (must have flex) because it is cheap, but with alum. engines and burning hot I do half and half sometimes. 
I have a BMW and regret it due to roads and parking spaces are for little bitty cars. Many car door dings!
Higher cost = higher annual insurance and Taxes.
Thing is VW still good, but I have never seen some of the models (any car brands) in the US and IMO they rename a model because they cut corners and lower price.
Also, think about security. Garage and streets. I just read PRF just stopped 2 vehicles and both were stolen from SP.

bloomboy,

It depends on how long you´ll stay in Brazil for now; if staying for more, consider whether you want to change cars very so often like every 3 years or so. If you plan to sell later, you should consider a vehicle that preserves its value better than the rest. Of course you know that when a new car is driven off the dealership it depreciates around 30% right then. It is the worst investment ever!

bloomboy :

Hi Robal, haha, the things we put ourselves through as students! Where was that - the states? I was speaking to an old professor here in S.P. he used to drive out to Camburi in the late 80's from Sao Paulo city when the road was just an old dirt road heading out into the middle of nowhere, lots have changed since then.. I have had a rethink, and realistically it makes more sense for me to stay in the city during weekdays and work towards having a weekend bolt hole beside the beach, for now, this makes far more sense.
So my next question is about cars and damn they look expensive! I kid you not but my car back in the UK, a Japanese Honda import, over here costs ten times the price second hand, that's a 1000% mark up! What model do you guys recommend to invest in?  Whats a good buy here in Brazil? reasonably well priced, reliable, nice to drive, etc ? ? Any suggestions welcome!

Post graduate in the US. I´m a Toyota man so the lowest priced Toyota would be Etios. But you should have a higher clearance car and also an all-wheel drive for stability especially during outpours and with a CVT transmission for faster acceleration and easier handling for the São Paulo traffic. So now it depends on your budget.

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