Best service to ship household items to Brasil

I recently Purchased a condo in Praia do Morro Guarapari  and want to ship small household items computers art and necessities from the US. Can anyone with experience recommend the best service to use..  Point out the pitfalls

Thanks Mike

I'm curious to see the responses.  Also, curious to know if such shipments can be made to Vitoria, and then arranged to be transported inland from there via truck or train.  Congrats on the purchase of your new condo, Mike.

Janet

If you're moving to Brazil as a resident rather than a tourist (family reunion, employment contract, retirement, student or volunteer visas under at least some circumstances), you're permitted ONE ocean shipment and ONE air shipment, duty-free.  The regulations are complicated, so it's important to choose a mover that has experience in moving people to Brazil, and has a Brazilian partner with a strong presence at this end, to pick up the move when the ship or plane arrives.  Allied and North American are owned by Sirva, an international logistics company with a strong presence in Brazil.  I had a very good move with them.  There are probably others, so it's worthwhile to get several quotes.  Beware of companies without Brazil experience:  general experience in long distance moves, even international moves, is probably not enough. 

Any professional moving company familiar with Brazil can arrange a door-to-door move, including delivery from the international port of entry.

Many people who are not moving a household but can fit their belongings in normal luggage have just paid excess baggage charges and taken that route, and have reported little or no trouble.

Viajanete :

I'm curious to see the responses.  Also, curious to know if such shipments can be made to Vitoria, and then arranged to be transported inland from there via truck or train.  Congrats on the purchase of your new condo, Mike.

Janet

Vitória is a small port, and most of the traffic into and out of it is related to mining; if a container vessel happened to be calling there at a convenient time for  your move your shipment might be booked on it, but it would be unlikely.  It's usually faster and cheaper for anything being shipped by water from North America to Southeastern Brazil to go to Santos, and be trucked from there.  That's where the best infrastructure is, and the most frequent arrivals.

Thanks once more, Abthree. 👍

If you ask, your mover can tell you what ship your goods go on, and you can track it on commercial navigation websites.   You may be surprised at the route your shipment takes to get to you.  Mine left Baltimore on a ship that was going to transit the Panama Canal, and spent a week in Cartagena, Colombia before being loaded onto a second ship that would round the north coast of South America and come up the Amazon.  🌎

Thanks for the replies. I have spoken to one so far and it was informative. He recommended door to door service. I was not aware of the one move duty free allowance so thanks for that. I have been thinking of taking the baggage route for our first travel there the condo is furnished 
Cheers

Good plan if you don't have too much stuff.  Hand-carrying the computers is a good idea, if possible.   Import duties on electronics are high, and if you ship them, count on them being opened and inspected.

I too would bring a laptop, phone and plugs, and clothes with you,' it will not be cheap to move big items, I had to ship it over, land in Santos overland costs was worst to the destination,
took all I could on the plane and paid free extra luggage fees,
It would be months

I'm seeing lots of advice from expats that, if you're paying your own moving costs (i.e., not an employer), it is often wiser simply to sell or store "all" your belongings and start over in Brazil.  Can you refer me to a Brazilian website that might give me an idea of the cost of various household items?  I'm setting up my budget, both my "settling in" budget and my "after-settling-in" budget.  Also welcome would be any information/tips on YOUR experience in furnishing your first place in Brazil.  As always, thank you!

A good place to start is amazon.com.br.  Their selection isn't nearly as broad as the parent company's, but they’ve worked hard to improve both selection and service since the covid crisis began.  It will give you a good idea of prices, too.

Most things you'll need, it makes sense to get in Brazil.   This includes TVs and household appliances,  especially if you'll be living in an area where the power is 220V.  The country has a well-developed consumer goods industry, often with good selection,  and fair or better quality.

Some small things that are commonplace in the US and can be hard to find here, especially of the same quality:
1. A simple drainboard!  This was my biggest surprise.   Not the rack where you put the dishes to drain, the tilted board that goes under it and takes the water back to the sink.  You can get the racks here, but drainboards seem to be unheard of.
2. Measuring cups and spoons in English units; you can get metric here easily.  A small tape measure in inches and feet, too.
3. Kitchen gadgets - anything in your gadget drawer, like a jar opener, if you're lucky enough to have one.
4. Serving pieces.  Brazilian dinnerware and flatware are fine, but good serving pieces are hard to find.  That includes ice cream scoops and paddles.
5. I really wish that I had brought my big, covered roasting pan.  I haven't found anything comparable.
6. If you're bringing a Roomba or any other specialized appliance like that, bring at least a year's supply of accessories (e.g., filters, brushes, etc.) as well.
If I remember any more "must-haves", I'll post them.   Fortunately, there aren't that many.

Well, electronics has about 60% of taxes on each item. (Phones, TV, Micro Waves, and such)
Depends on the city. If you have a Walmart, Bahia, Americanas type stores you can compare shopping. That said many items are made in China, therefor recommend a brand in which you have repair shops. Mobilia's  (furniture) range cheap to the higher end.

I may have mentioned I looked into shipping furniture (car also), but I had to arrange a moving company to Miami, then the international shipper would send via boat to Santos. Then the cost from Santos to Foz was about the same as to Miami.
The costs of furniture at home were not worth the shipping costs. (As to the car, tax on such was more than the value of the car (plus shipping and insurance), so no brainer.
Look online at brastemp;
Fridge R$3200 for the top of the line
Stove R$ 900 (4 burners) to $R 2600 for 5 burners (all propane)
Washer (depends on size) recommend 12kg to 15 kg $R 950 (they have a 12kg w/ water heater if you need hot water.)
Dryer $R 1800 (recommend 220v to dry faster). Now many just use clotheslines
Micro wave....find anywhere
Leather recliner $R 2000
Sofas from $R 500 and up.

That's what I have bought. Over the years here. (plus numerous under sink/shower water heaters. Agin for best hot water 220v, but have flip flops on!
There are other police makes, but Panasonic and other imports, hold on to your "skivvies". taxes once again are killers.
If you have favorite brand type add brand name .com,br to see if available
I will add electric plugs from the US are different than BR. Unless you want a lot of adapters all over the house it is best to buy in BR.
Even some portable heaters (1500 w may overload your plugs) Have a "true electrician" update circuit breakers. Go for good techs, not "handymen" for electric, gas, and major home stuff. There are some trying DIY, but it gets old trying to figure out "what the heck" is all this.

Quality of furnitures are not good in Brazil. If you have nice and valuable items like
oak or mahogany you might want to transport them. There are cities that use 110v like
Porto Alegre, Curitiba. If you´re going to a 220v city and you plan to bring American appliances bring transformers of at least 1,000 watts especially for cooking (heavy though). If you transport furniture, then you can include them. Ovens, refrigerators
and washing machines are of reasonable quality but not as good as american. Computers - bring them with you and your Instant Pot. I repent I did not bring my Kamado grill which is good for smoking and rotisserie!

Household appliances or furnitures, google:

1. magazineluiza.com.br
2. Colombo
3. Casa Bahia
4. Lojas Americanas
5. Submarino
6. Ponto Frio
7. amazon.com.br

robal

Wow!! You guys are great! Thanks for the helpful input. I'll keep all of it in mind.
Funny on the Kitchen Gadget comment. One thing I love about Brazil is the simplicity. My favorite Brazilian Gadget I brought to the states is my bottle opener. It's a small carved fish with a screw in it. It hangs next to the beer fridge on the patio and I use it all the time. Funny when some American friends can't figure it out right away.
Cheers

CALRIO :

Wow!! You guys are great! Thanks for the helpful input. I'll keep all of it in mind.
Funny on the Kitchen Gadget comment. One thing I love about Brazil is the simplicity. My favorite Brazilian Gadget I brought to the states is my bottle opener. It's a small carved fish with a screw in it. It hangs next to the beer fridge on the patio and I use it all the time. Funny when some American friends can't figure it out right away.
Cheers

I think kitchen utensils are the only ones I like. Pots and pans though, not so much because they use a lot of aluminum. I still have a stainless steel carved like a fish where a whole salmon would fit ready for an oven bake. I bought it at a public market in Guaratuba, Parana a beachside town where they sell fresh seafood...

robal

One solution about voltage is to get an electrician and wire your house for 110v and 220v. You should know and plan where you would connect that specific appliance...
I have it in my house.

robal

Robal is right, Have one 220 and one 110 in almost every room.
Bath the same with the 220 for the showerheads.
As mentioned is an old home with brick and motor, it is a bitch to run new wires,
Now, most are running split room a/c's.
After I moved in the old hard wired security had to go and replaced with web-based, but on holes in every room were used to get 220v  wires to replace a 110v wall plug. Again start with breaker boxes,
Some rooms the kitchen should have a stove, fridge separate but mine all were on one circuit dishwasher and just 3 plugs,s You use a dishwasher, toaster, sink hot water and Micky wave and your hear juice goes down,
Dedicate one plug for PC's and printer. Also, have one for charging the phone.
Kids come how and they have 2 prone and fight to use a play near, So they breakout and adapter with 3 phones connected.
All the choices seem to be plastic covers and break because they don't hold the sock when removing, (clipped on covers, not screwed in.
While on that subject older homes have 2 prone and no ground, New appliances will have 3 prong ends for grounds, adapters bypass the ground. I brought 2 surges protectors from US and use for PC/Printers use and then wit PCs.
Mark all plugins 200 or 110. HAVE A 110/200 outside for mowing. If possible bring a goof rated cord with you. Mowing with these thin cord here and they heat up. I wanted individual shut off under each sink, but remember metric and imperial connection do not work.

You guys really ARE great!  That's exactly the kind of information I'm looking for.  Yes, please - if you think of additional info, please supplement!  I will definitely be living simply for awhile.  Even thinking of using patio furniture IN the house until such time as I can get more solid pieces.   Thanks for the suggested names / brands.

Same here on electricity.

Manaus is a (mostly) 110V city.  Our building was built in the '70s, and had three single outlets in the kitchen, one single outlet each in every other room, and three 220 outlets - 2 for AC in two out of three bedrooms, and one for hot water in one of three bathrooms.   We replaced everything:   all new, upgraded breakers of course, eight double outlets in the kitchen, at least two double outlets in every other room, the last bedroom wired 220V for AC, and a second bathroom,  so guests can have hot water, too.  Ceiling fans in every room.  Part of a two month renovation, while we lived somewhere else.

Here’s a few:

Like Home Depot

Small Household Store

Here’s a few:

http://www.leroymerlin.com.br/
http://www.pontofrio.com.br/
http://www.casasbahia.com.br/



Leroy Merlin

Pontofrio

Casasbahia

All have websites with pricing

Regards,

Tim

One more thing when shopping and want to compare prices. Use:

buscape.com.br

It will compare the prices of the different stores like submarino, casas bahia, magazine
luiza etc. So it will give you the lowest price of an item to the higher ones...

By far the cheapest I've found:
International Parcel Service (http://www.ipsparcel.com/)
    ○ Door-to-door service
    ○ Insurance:  max insurance $300 for all boxes. ;-(
        § 1 items: $270 (prices as of 6/23/2020)
        § 2 items: $356 ($178 ea, confirmed)
        § 3 items: $703 ($234 ea)
        § 4 items: $937 ($234 ea)
    ○ With $3000 insurance: price for two boxes goes up to $559 ($279 ea)

By far the best price comparison site for cheapest shipping services: International Parcel Service (http://www.ipsparcel.com/)
    ○ Door-to-door service
    ○ Insurance:  max insurance $300 for all boxes results in the cheapest prices:
        § 1 items: $270 (prices as of 6/23/2020)
        § 2 items: $356 ($178 ea, confirmed)
        § 3 items: $703 ($234 ea)
        § 4 items: $937 ($234 ea)
    ○ With $3000 insurance: price for two boxes goes up to $559 ($279 ea)

Unless really special, buy on BRASIL.

You will save a lot of headaches and frustration.

Yes, I am homesick for many items I'm the USA.

If you can bring as extra baggage, then much simpler and safer.

Have a great day

Calrio - "pitfalls"..... I've been watching folks move from the USA to Brazil and the other way around since the early 80s. Some people have no problems whatsoever, especially if they live near port cities or have good contacts.

Way back when, I new people that were on a ship that bounced back and forth from Santos to Milwaukee Wisconsin. That was great. Everything we moved made it without a hitch.

Then in the 90s I had a friend in Minneapolis that shipped a container of his stuff (even had a car aboard back then) and the whole container got ripped off on arrival at Vitoria in Espirito Santo.

In my last move here (my first was in 1984) I carried 3 suitcases with my most dear possessions that fit into suitcases (arrived - no problem), sent 8 small boxes of books via the postal service (arrived - no problem) and contracted a company (not sure they still exist) in Chicago to take 2 large boxes (about the size of a large stove) with paintings, special carpets, my favorite sound speakers, a BOB Yak bike trailer and a whole spreadsheet of other items all detailed and given a green light by the shipping company. Months passed and the Chicago company stopped taking calls. I had somebody drop in to the store and they were assured that my goods had made it to Santos (destino=Paraiba). More months and the next visit to the store we found that supposedly the company was lining up a shipper to the northeast. Months passed and supposedly the material was en route and in storage in a small city near Belo Horizonte. More months and I get a call from a lawyer who tells me that the Civil Police of the small town raided the warehouse and found my items to be contraband and that with his help and a lot of money I could fight to get the items back.

Hah! I had unexpectedly gone into "voluntary simplicity" mode and had been stripped of a lot of my possessions. I never tried to recoop my goods because it seemed like there were only layers of scammers that I would have to face to probably not get back those things that had value to me.

Be really careful when you ship stuff here and if at all possible just leave it behind. You can get most anything here in Brazil (still no BOB Yak bike trailers!!) OR you can slowly bring the most personally valuable items back with each visit you make home.

MattB

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