How Worried Are You Coronavirus?

The Institut Pasteur of Paris is working on a vaccine that could be ready for the summer of 2021 ... we can already see the numbers of deaths increasing in China ... all the countries bordering China must be worried because all will affected be sure... , I think that a lot of expats will have to return to their countries ... because the cost in matters of health will be very high (most of them without medical insurance)  in case of illness .....you will see like now in China...all of them are going back home!!

Let's hope noone is forced to return to Netherland because the influenza virus there would give them heart cancer!  :whistle:

Mike Wagner :

Chinese are gone but were allowed to come and came while it was breaking out in China. The fact that they're gone at this point is pretty irrelevant. In a country with high population density, poor healthcare and close to zero care about other people's well-being, the chances of an outbreak are rather high. (I truly hope I am wrong though)

I wouldn't say "zero care". My temperature is checked every time I walk into my building. I also have to change my plans because the government has closed Cat Ba and Ha Long Bay to all tourism. The army has taken over the ferries to Cat Ba. There were similar precautions in Singapore during the SARS outbreak. While the VN government may not care about people per se, I think this is more of an economic concern for many nations.

Ontheroad57 :

Cambodia’s Hun Sen made a statement yesterday saying he would “ kick anyone out of the country seen wearing a mask” 

He said you all look stupid & are scaring people away..

Personally,,,I’m wearing one of those heavy brass diving bells.

Masks are useless so good for Hun Sen!

True, and a fact most people are unaware of. Even Surgical masks are pretty much useless against Coronavirus. Only an N95 Respirator or similar is effective.

Indices :

True, and a fact most people are unaware of. Even Surgical masks are pretty much useless against Coronavirus. Only an N95 Respirator or similar is effective.

Thar's what we wear and gifted to friends and relatives, 3M N95 - 9211 and N95 - 8511.  A handful of N100 - 8293 we're keeping for ourselves.

"I think this has largely been a social media virus. "
Sure it has.
Thats why the Chines govermnent has closed off cities with 20 million people . Or is that just fake news in your opinion..?

Thepakkizeggypharts :

"I think this has largely been a social media virus. "
Sure it has.
Thats why the Chines govermnent has closed off cities with 20 million people . Or is that just fake news in your opinion..?

Out of a population of 1.43 Billion..

Thepakkizeggypharts :

"I think this has largely been a social media virus. "
Sure it has.
Thats why the Chines govermnent has closed off cities with 20 million people . Or is that just fake news in your opinion..?

Out of a population of 1.43 Billion !
No one is saying the virus should not be taken seriously but it needs to be kept in proportion to other risks.

Well, the number of confirmed cases in Vietnam has dramatically risen to 12.

Vietnam confirms two more novel coronavirus infections

https://e.vnexpress.net/news/news/vietn … 51454.html

Thepakkizeggypharts :

"I think this has largely been a social media virus. "
Sure it has.
Thats why the Chines govermnent has closed off cities with 20 million people . Or is that just fake news in your opinion..?

What the Chinese have done is preemptively quarantined entire cities to stop the SPREAD of the virus, until they can determine who is actually infected.

No, the social media virus is the widespread panic outside of China over something that is simply not that threatening if you take practical precautions to limit your exposure.

1. Wash/sanitize your hands, often.
2. Be aware of touching your face with your hands.
2. Don't go to Wuhan or have close contact with those that do.

Unless you have an underlying respiratory condition, then you should be fine. Awareness and a basic grasp of science is all that's required.

Suppobill :
Thepakkizeggypharts :

"I think this has largely been a social media virus. "
Sure it has.
Thats why the Chines govermnent has closed off cities with 20 million people . Or is that just fake news in your opinion..?

What the Chinese have done is preemptively quarantined entire cities to stop the SPREAD of the virus, until they can determine who is actually infected.

No, the social media virus is the widespread panic outside of China over something that is simply not that threatening if you take practical precautions to limit your exposure.

1. Wash/sanitize your hands, often.
2. Be aware of touching your face with your hands.
2. Don't go to Wuhan or have close contact with those that do.

Unless you have an underlying respiratory condition, then you should be fine. Awareness and a basic grasp of science is all that's required.

Well said, good to hear some sanity rather than unjustified panic. You are more likely to be killed by some idiot on the road than get a virus from them.

This virus could save lives to kill 400 million plus. The real "bad case" (not worst case) figs suggest 400 million could die within a year.

However, best case is deaths are limited as coranaviruses mutate very fast and non deadly strains strains spread starting a new cold virus - SARS basically evolved itself into a non deadly strain.

Save lives you ask? It is estimated that 1.6 million die a year in Chima alone due to pollution. The slump in the economy in China, will reduce pollution saving lives. Maybe more than die from ncov2019.

But anyone saying it isn't potentially serious doesn't understand Maths or science. The numbers as we have them are frightening with an R0 of 2.7 to 4 and a long asymptomatic period.....

Ciambella :
Indices :

True, and a fact most people are unaware of. Even Surgical masks are pretty much useless against Coronavirus. Only an N95 Respirator or similar is effective.

Thar's what we wear and gifted to friends and relatives, 3M N95 - 9211 and N95 - 8511.  A handful of N100 - 8293 we're keeping for ourselves.

Everyone talks about masks.

Nobody talks about handwashing.

Listen to the doctor:

want-to-avoid-virus-forget-face-masks-top-airline-doctor-says

Q: What’s important if you are on a plane to ensure you don’t get infected?

A: Hand hygiene -- because contrary to what people think, the hands are the way that these viruses most efficiently spread. Top of the list is frequent hand washing, hand sanitizing, or both. Avoid touching your face. If you cough or sneeze, it’s important to cover your face with a sleeve. Better yet, a tissue to be disposed of carefully, and then sanitizing the hands afterward. Washing your hands and drying them is the best procedure. When that’s not easy to do, alcohol-based sanitizer is a good second-best.


Q: Does wearing masks and gloves help prevent infections?

A: First of all, masks. There’s very limited evidence of benefit, if any, in a casual situation. Masks are useful for those who are unwell to protect other people from them. But wearing a mask all the time will be ineffective. It will allow viruses to be transmitted around it, through it and worse still, if it becomes moist it will encourage the growth of viruses and bacteria. Gloves are probably even worse, because people put on gloves and then touch everything they would have touched with their hands. So it just becomes another way of transferring micro-organisms. And inside the gloves, your hands get hot and sweaty, which is a really good environment for microbes to grow.

The people of  China need our help.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nkF4qYd … ploademail

From the husband of a Chinese doctor.

OceanBeach92107 :

Nobody talks about handwashing.

We always wash our hand diligently before and after every activity, a dozen times a day, so there's no change with this virus.  We also have a travel bottle of BioProtect hand sanitizer in every bag/backpack/purse (I've been buying a carton of 48 bottles each time) so we're never without hand protection.

Ciambella :
OceanBeach92107 :

Nobody talks about handwashing.

We always wash our hand diligently before and after every activity, a dozen times a day, so there's no change with this virus.  We also have a travel bottle of BioProtect hand sanitizer in every bag/backpack/purse (I've been buying a carton of 48 bottles each time) so we're never without hand protection.

Obvious advice for those that are privileged enough to be able to afford all the masks and sanitisers you mention. But for most families here they are struggling to get all they need just to live and feed their children.

Indices :

Obvious advice for those that are privileged enough to be able to afford all the masks and sanitisers you mention. But for most families here they are struggling to get all they need just to live and feed their children.

I would've agreed with that statement except that I'm acquainted with and living among thousands of people whose priorities are not exactly sensible, whose idea of preparation is rushing around paying peak price for goods (any kind of goods, not just masks or hand sanitizers) instead of recognising the needs and purchasing the tools ahead of time.

Yes, any expat income is a lot higher than the locals' average salary so you may say we're privileged, but at the same time, many expats don't sit at the corner cafe every morning and eat out weekly as many locals do. 

"Struggling to get all they need just to live and feed their children."? Granted, I've never lived in the countryside so I'm not familiar with the quality of life there, but in large and small cities -- Hanoi and its vicinity, Hue, Da Nang, Nha Trang, Saigon and its vicinity, Ba Ria, Vung Tau, etc. -- the struggle can be lessened with understanding and practicing strict budget. Unfortunately, staying within a strict budget is something most Vietnamese do not understand. They talk about it all the time, but they don't actually practice it.   

A great majority of Vietnamese, even the ones who sell goods at neighbourhood markets, are gold hoarders. I mentioned this fact a couple years ago on this forum: don't judge a Vietnamese by the mismatched pyjamas and cheap bathroom slippers they wear on the street. More than 75% of the "poor" women to whom you wouldn't give a second glance are wearing enough gold under their clothing or hiding enough gold in their houses to pay for a motorbike.

Perhaps they're struggling to pay the rent or the children's tuition, but "struggling to get all they need just to live and feed their children"? Hardly. Not when just about any woman can come up with the money to pay for eyebrow tattooing and permanent lipstick spraying.

Last, but definitely not least, this is an expat forum.  The advices asked and given here are from expats and to expats. We're not advising the random Đinh, Lê, Lý, Trần, or Nguyễn family to buy 3M masks and BioProtect hand sanitizers. We're talking about the expats who can afford 3M masks and have the resource to buy good sanitizers. No Vietnamese who has to struggle to put food on the table is going to come to this forum asking for our advices, ever.

"Out of a population of 1.43 Billion.."
That is  completely irrelevant.
The fact that 20-30 million people are locked in their cities is an indication of the massive threat this virus poses to humanity. That knobhead in cambodia Hen Sen should be whipped for his greed and stupidity. Stay safe out there folks...while you still can.

Ciambella :
Indices :

Obvious advice for those that are privileged enough to be able to afford all the masks and sanitisers you mention. But for most families here they are struggling to get all they need just to live and feed their children.

I would've agreed with that statement except that I'm acquainted with and living among thousands of people whose priorities are not exactly sensible, whose idea of preparation is rushing around paying peak price for goods (any kind of goods, not just masks or sanitizers) instead of recognising the needs and purchasing the tools ahead of time.

Yes, any expat income is a lot higher than the locals' average salary so you may say we're privileged, but at the same time, many expats don't sit at the corner cafe every morning and eat out weekly as many locals do.  In fact, my husband and I rarely ever spend money for food and drink outside of the house as most Vietnamese workers do. 

"Struggling to get all they need just to live and feed their children."? Granted, I've never lived in the countryside so I'm not familiar with the quality of life there, but in large cities -- Hanoi and its vicinity, Hue, Da Nang, Nha Trang, Saigon and its vicinity -- the struggle can be lessen easily with simple understanding and practicing strict budget.  Unfortunately, staying within a strict budget is something most Vietnamese do not understand.  They talk about it all the time, but they don't actually practice it.   

A great majority of Vietnamese, even the ones who sell goods at neighbourhood markets, are gold hoarders.  I mentioned this fact a couple years ago on this forum:  don't judge a Vietnamese by the mismatched pyjamas and cheap bathroom slippers they wear on the street.  More than 75% of the "poor" women to whom you wouldn't give a second glance are wearing enough gold under their clothing to pay for a motorbike.

Perhaps they're struggling to pay the rent or the children's tuition, but "struggling to get all they need just to live and feed their children"?  Hardly.  Not when there's money to pay for eyebrow tattooing and permanent lipstick spraying.

Last, but definitely not least, this is an expat forum.  The advices asked and given here are from expats and to expats.  We're not advising the random Đinh, Lê, Lý, Trần, or Nguyễn family to buy 3M masks and BioProtect hand sanitizers.  We're talking about the expats who can afford 3M masks and have the resource to buy good sanitizers.  No Vietnamese who has to struggle to put food on the table is going to come to this forum asking for our advices, ever.

I understand what you are saying but I think your view of life here is somewhat rose coloured and presumptuous. To say these posts do not relate to the Vietnamese ignores the fact that many ex-pats have Vietnamese wives and children, many of whose families would quite frankly laugh at the idea that they have hidden gold under their clothing and do indeed struggle without eating out ( which at times for locals is cheaper than actually cooking in cramped poorly equipped conditions ), getting tattoos or makeup etc. There are always exceptions but to suggest that is the norm is not true.
Unfortunately feeling the need to state how you are able to buy 48 sanitisers at a time or purchase high end facemarks for all and sundry in your family is quite unnecessary other than to show that you can.
My wife and, I am sure,  many others read these posts but you are right in saying they would never ask for advice and it is easy to see why. Ex-pats are or should be entwined with the Vietnamese, we are not a separate elite bunch of immigrants.
As for life in the rural areas it might be a good idea for you to get around a bit.

Indices :
Ciambella :
Indices :

Obvious advice for those that are privileged enough to be able to afford all the masks and sanitisers you mention. But for most families here they are struggling to get all they need just to live and feed their children.

I would've agreed with that statement except that I'm acquainted with and living among thousands of people whose priorities are not exactly sensible, whose idea of preparation is rushing around paying peak price for goods (any kind of goods, not just masks or sanitizers) instead of recognising the needs and purchasing the tools ahead of time.

Yes, any expat income is a lot higher than the locals' average salary so you may say we're privileged, but at the same time, many expats don't sit at the corner cafe every morning and eat out weekly as many locals do.  In fact, my husband and I rarely ever spend money for food and drink outside of the house as most Vietnamese workers do. 

"Struggling to get all they need just to live and feed their children."? Granted, I've never lived in the countryside so I'm not familiar with the quality of life there, but in large cities -- Hanoi and its vicinity, Hue, Da Nang, Nha Trang, Saigon and its vicinity -- the struggle can be lessen easily with simple understanding and practicing strict budget.  Unfortunately, staying within a strict budget is something most Vietnamese do not understand.  They talk about it all the time, but they don't actually practice it.   

A great majority of Vietnamese, even the ones who sell goods at neighbourhood markets, are gold hoarders.  I mentioned this fact a couple years ago on this forum:  don't judge a Vietnamese by the mismatched pyjamas and cheap bathroom slippers they wear on the street.  More than 75% of the "poor" women to whom you wouldn't give a second glance are wearing enough gold under their clothing to pay for a motorbike.

Perhaps they're struggling to pay the rent or the children's tuition, but "struggling to get all they need just to live and feed their children"?  Hardly.  Not when there's money to pay for eyebrow tattooing and permanent lipstick spraying.

Last, but definitely not least, this is an expat forum.  The advices asked and given here are from expats and to expats.  We're not advising the random Đinh, Lê, Lý, Trần, or Nguyễn family to buy 3M masks and BioProtect hand sanitizers.  We're talking about the expats who can afford 3M masks and have the resource to buy good sanitizers.  No Vietnamese who has to struggle to put food on the table is going to come to this forum asking for our advices, ever.

I understand what you are saying but I think your view of life here is somewhat rose coloured and presumptuous. To say these posts do not relate to the Vietnamese ignores the fact that many ex-pats have Vietnamese wives and children, many of whose families would quite frankly laugh at the idea that they have hidden gold under their clothing and do indeed struggle without eating out ( which at times for locals is cheaper than actually cooking in cramped poorly equipped conditions ), getting tattoos or makeup etc. There are always exceptions but to suggest that is the norm is not true.
Unfortunately feeling the need to state how you are able to buy 48 sanitisers at a time or purchase high end facemarks for all and sundry in your family is quite unnecessary other than to show that you can.
My wife and, I am sure,  many others read these posts but you are right in saying they would never ask for advice and it is easy to see why. Ex-pats are or should be entwined with the Vietnamese, we are not a separate elite bunch of immigrants.
As for life in the rural areas it might be a good idea for you to get around a bit.

Just wondering how much experience you have living in VN, as your posts seem to be very illinformed.

Colinoscapee.

I was in Vietnam just after the Americans pulled out, had a spell of 11 years in rural areas and have now spent another 12 yrs predominantly living here. There is a vast difference of opinion and experience between those that live as ex-pats and those that are heavily involved in life here. Backgrounds, locations, wealth etc etc tend to produce a variety of views that are accurate within the relevant lifestyle rather than reality. Everyones experience is different.

Indices :

Colinoscapee.

I was in Vietnam just after the Americans pulled out, had a spell of 11 years in rural areas and have now spent another 12 yrs predominantly living here. There is a vast difference of opinion and experience between those that live as ex-pats and those that are heavily involved in life here. Backgrounds, locations, wealth etc etc tend to produce a variety of views that are accurate within the relevant lifestyle rather than reality. Everyones experience is different.

You do realise that Ciambella is Vietnamese, therefore her insight will be greater than yours as an expat.

Indices :

Colinoscapee.

I was in Vietnam just after the Americans pulled out, had a spell of 11 years in rural areas and have now spent another 12 yrs predominantly living here. There is a vast difference of opinion and experience between those that live as ex-pats and those that are heavily involved in life here. Backgrounds, locations, wealth etc etc tend to produce a variety of views that are accurate within the relevant lifestyle rather than reality. Everyones experience is different.

That revelation that Ciambella is Vietnamese has put a dent in your argument.

colinoscapee :
Indices :

Colinoscapee.

I was in Vietnam just after the Americans pulled out, had a spell of 11 years in rural areas and have now spent another 12 yrs predominantly living here. There is a vast difference of opinion and experience between those that live as ex-pats and those that are heavily involved in life here. Backgrounds, locations, wealth etc etc tend to produce a variety of views that are accurate within the relevant lifestyle rather than reality. Everyones experience is different.

You do realise that Ciambella is Vietnamese, therefore her insight will be greater than yours as an expat.

I am not doubting Clambella's experience but it rather depends on her circumstances. We are all different. You could be born and bred in the UK for example all your life but if you lived in London you would have an entirely different view of British life than someone that lived in Glasgow or Cardiff. Clambella stated that she does not know much about rural areas etc. No one is right or wrong about whatever way they see life here, it is different for everyone.

Indices :
colinoscapee :
Indices :

Colinoscapee.

I was in Vietnam just after the Americans pulled out, had a spell of 11 years in rural areas and have now spent another 12 yrs predominantly living here. There is a vast difference of opinion and experience between those that live as ex-pats and those that are heavily involved in life here. Backgrounds, locations, wealth etc etc tend to produce a variety of views that are accurate within the relevant lifestyle rather than reality. Everyones experience is different.

You do realise that Ciambella is Vietnamese, therefore her insight will be greater than yours as an expat.

I am not doubting Clambella's experience but it rather depends on her circumstances. We are all different. You could be born and bred in the UK for example all your life but if you lived in London you would have an entirely different view of British life than someone that lived in Glasgow or Cardiff. Clambella stated that she does not know much about rural areas etc. No one is right or wrong about whatever way they see life here, it is different for everyone.

You thought she was an expat, telling her to get out and educate herself.

You can put a spin on it any way you like, the point is, she will always understand life and the culture way better than most expats.

I know her personally, so I can speak with a fair degree of trust in what she writes.

colinoscapee :
Indices :
colinoscapee :


You do realise that Ciambella is Vietnamese, therefore her insight will be greater than yours as an expat.

I am not doubting Clambella's experience but it rather depends on her circumstances. We are all different. You could be born and bred in the UK for example all your life but if you lived in London you would have an entirely different view of British life than someone that lived in Glasgow or Cardiff. Clambella stated that she does not know much about rural areas etc. No one is right or wrong about whatever way they see life here, it is different for everyone.

You thought she was an expat, telling her to get out and educate herself.

You can put a spin on it any way you like, the point is, she will always understand life and the culture way better than most expats.

I know her personally, so I can speak with a fair degree of trust in what she writes.

It was perfectly obvious from Clambella's previous posts that she is Vietnamese and much of her advice is very valuable in circumstances that relate to her individual experience. But that experience is not related to all issues. Neither is mine, yours or anyone else's. What is your problem with stating an opinion ?
We all have different views, that's the whole point of the forum isn't it ?

Indices :
colinoscapee :
Indices :


I am not doubting Clambella's experience but it rather depends on her circumstances. We are all different. You could be born and bred in the UK for example all your life but if you lived in London you would have an entirely different view of British life than someone that lived in Glasgow or Cardiff. Clambella stated that she does not know much about rural areas etc. No one is right or wrong about whatever way they see life here, it is different for everyone.

You thought she was an expat, telling her to get out and educate herself.

You can put a spin on it any way you like, the point is, she will always understand life and the culture way better than most expats.

I know her personally, so I can speak with a fair degree of trust in what she writes.

It was perfectly obvious from Clambella's previous posts that she is Vietnamese and much of her advice is very valuable in circumstances that relate to her individual experience. But that experience is not related to all issues. Neither is mine, yours or anyone else's. What is your problem with stating an opinion ?
We all have different views, that's the whole point of the forum isn't it ?

Damn, do I really need to explain myself.

I feel you would make a good politician.

The number of comfirmed cases has soared sharply to 13 (an increase of one).

Vinh Phuc province hosts Vietnam’s 13th nCoV patient

https://e.vnexpress.net/news/news/vinh- … 52006.html

colinoscapee :
Indices :
colinoscapee :


You thought she was an expat, telling her to get out and educate herself.

You can put a spin on it any way you like, the point is, she will always understand life and the culture way better than most expats.

I know her personally, so I can speak with a fair degree of trust in what she writes.

It was perfectly obvious from Clambella's previous posts that she is Vietnamese and much of her advice is very valuable in circumstances that relate to her individual experience. But that experience is not related to all issues. Neither is mine, yours or anyone else's. What is your problem with stating an opinion ?
We all have different views, that's the whole point of the forum isn't it ?

Damn, do I really need to explain myself.

I feel you would make a good politician.

Have good day.

I would think that a woman's bra would be more effective than a regular mask, given that during WW1, many men on the front lines used women's bras to effectively inhibit contamination from Mustard Gas.

FloridaRefugee :

I would think that a woman's bra would be more effective than a regular mask, given that during WW1, many men on the front lines used women's bras to effectively inhibit contamination from Mustard Gas.

I wonder what the reaction of the Cambodian boss would be to people wandering around with bras on their heads   :o

I am concerned about the corona virus spreading in Vietnam but also more concerned about the effectiveness of the average mask seen on the streets. During WW1, men fighting on the front lines often wore women's bras to inhibit contamination from Mustard Gas....perhaps it is time to "get in on the ground floor" and invest in women's bras? Hhmmmm

But then again, unforeseen problems may emerge when considering the padded bra....when doubled up, may cause asphyxiation.....more research should be considered before committing to such an endeavor.

Indices :

I was in Vietnam just after the Americans pulled out, had a spell of 11 years in rural areas ....

So based on that statement, you were in Vietnam from maybe 1974 to 1985.  This would place you in the country squarely during the premiership of Le Duan who died in 1986.   As this was a period of forced collectivization in the countryside, and an actual decline in personal income from the war years, how did an Englishman survive?  You certainly were not teaching ESL. It was also a period when many of the same people that you can see walking the streets today were in reeducation camps.  I realize that Vietnam was theoretically open to citizens of countries like the UK that had declined to participate in the war but I am wondering if you could walk the streets freely.

There was food rationing, and coupons were required to purchase food.  As a foreigner, how did you get ration coupons?  (My wife has told me that she made extra money as a teen smuggling refined sugar from Ben Tre to Tien Giang Province as even that much trade was illegal.  This was to assist her family even though her father was fully employed as a Party official.)  Again, as an Englishman, how did you keep body and mind together during that time, especially living in the countryside.

:lol:

FloridaRefugee :

I am concerned about the corona virus spreading in Vietnam but also more concerned about the effectiveness of the average mask seen on the streets. During WW1, men fighting on the front lines often wore women's bras to inhibit contamination from Mustard Gas....perhaps it is time to "get in on the ground floor" and invest in women's bras? Hhmmmm

Anyone thinking that Western healthcare will cope if there are signicant outbreaks is kidding themselves. Certainly in the UK, most hospitals are barely functional at the best of times. No disrespect intended to the medical staff, rather commenting on decades of shite management and squandered budgets.

Masks are useless. CV sails right through N95 filters and even if it didn't, unless you have glued the thing to your face you'll just be sucking unfiltered air in from around the sides.

Anyway, best wishes to all, but fear and stress and traffic and many other things will kill you before CV is ever likely to.

USS Oriskany CVA 34 Tonkin Gulf Yankee, Dixie Staions, 72-73. I have been here since June of 2009.

THIGV :
Indices :

I was in Vietnam just after the Americans pulled out, had a spell of 11 years in rural areas ....

So based on that statement, you were in Vietnam from maybe 1974 to 1985.  This would place you in the country squarely during the premiership of Le Duan who died in 1986.   As this was a period of forced collectivization in the countryside, and an actual decline in personal income from the war years, how did an Englishman survive?  You certainly were not teaching ESL. It was also a period when many of the same people that you can see walking the streets today were in reeducation camps.  I realize that Vietnam was theoretically open to citizens of countries like the UK that had declined to participate in the war but I am wondering if you could walk the streets freely.

There was food rationing, and coupons were required to purchase food.  As a foreigner, how did you get ration coupons?  (My wife has told me that she made extra money as a teen smuggling refined sugar from Ben Tre to Tien Giang Province as even that much trade was illegal.  This was to assist her family even though her father was fully employed as a Party official.)  Again, as an Englishman, how did you keep body and mind together during that time, especially living in the countryside.

It was not an easy time and one I see no reason to go into apart from saying I was mainly involved in infrastructure projects. I had a university degree in mechanical engineering obtained by the time I was 22. My skills were especially useful during that period and rarely travelled without escort. The atrocities I witnesses on a daily basis are best left buried.

I've started a new thread about the dangers of wearing a mask too much:

DO NOT Wear A Mask Unless...

New topic