Hoping all is well for expats living near Taal Volcano

I hope all is well for expats living near or are affected by the recent eruption of Taal Volcano. I  know many expats have made residence in towns near the volcano such as Tagaytay because of cooler climate. 

I believe Calif-Native and Teejay live in the province of Cavite. Some expat members  mentioned they live in Lipa, Batangas.

The Canadian national who's renting my parents' vacation house in Tagaytay moved temporarily to Taal Vista Lodge because there was no power and water for days in Tagaytay. An expat friend who lives at Splendido moved in temporarily with relatives in Pampanga.

Ash fall reached as far as Quezon City, where I and my family live. The day after the explosion, I noticed fine black sand scattered on our patio and balcony. Out of stock on N95 face masks and even surgical / medical masks.

Hoping that you're all okay.

We sincerely wish all residents/expats a speedy end to the unforseen sufferings caused by the TAAL eruption in "BATANGAS" & surrounding "TAGAYTAY" area.
Just yesterday night  (23rd Jan) on GMA News network there was a live broadcast showing some protesting residents demanding that they needed to go back into their homes to attend to their animals & the PHP Army which had a "lock-down" of the area in place, finally relenting & allowing them to return!...."Whaaaatttt????"
I personally feel this is totally uncalled for by the PHP Army to allow such blatent violation of  the "Lock Down", though i do feel for the villagers sufferings/loss of earnings ...it would only give an oppourtunity for 'looters' to raid the area that was left deserted by law abiding/suffering residents/expats.
At least they should have taken down the particulars of these returning villagers who demanded to return, so checks can be made if anything were to go missing (which I did NOT witness)..whatever it is..."Human Life Safety" has to be kept a the priority".
We sincerely wish the very best/safe return of all our expats/residents to their homes and way of life.
God bless

I watched an old documentary about Mt St Helens.

It started with a phreatic eruption just like Taal. Then came the quakes. The authorities evacuated everyone. This started two months before the big eruption in May 1980.

As time dragged on the people grew restless and demanded to be allowed to return. The state governor relented and made everyone sign releases to get back in the the St Helens danger zone.

then in May 1980 it exploded VEI 5

Hi guys;

Hope all in getting better in "BATANGAS" & surrounding "TAGAYTAY"areas; understand the warning level still stands[at]3),

The residents/expats I presume would have managed to move back into their homes and got on with their lives.

Any experiences/advice that anyone cares to share which would be appreciated.

Thanks

Our home is about 18km from the volcano.  We did not know of the eruption for about two hours until a friend living in the SM Wind condos just across the highway from the ridge overlooking the volcano sent us a pic and told us of the eruption.

We went to the back of our home and looked out to see the volcanic cloud rising in the sky, the lighting, and the huge cloud of ash heading our way.  At that time we also began to feel the stronger of the 100's of earthquakes that were occurring and then the ash began to fall.

That day through the following morning we accumulated about 2 inches of ash on our home and the scenery around us was like something out of a Hollywood movie.  Gray, bleak and desolate, though the winds had changed direction and the ashfall had ceased.
During that time we also lost power and water, though the water was restored within about 2 hours or so.

The greenery around the house was destroyed and we began the cleanup. We hired a crew of three to clean the roof, gutters, and fences. It took about three days for them to do a good cleanup and washing of the roof, etc..
We then began cleaning the rest of the mess ourselves, The dust was bad for about a week and the house and area around had to be cleaned over and over.

We had no power for about a week, though we had emergency lighting, candles and plenty of batteries. We heated water on the stove for a warm and welcome shower and made the best of it. 
Without power, it became necessary to begin cooking everything in the refrigerator,  we had plenty of hot home-cooked meals. 

Meralco, we found out, had trouble restoring power because of the accumulation of ash on the insulators on every power pole and transformer. The ash had a high iron content and was causing shorts and arcing, so every insulator had to be cleaned before power could be restored. A monstrous job and to have power back in a week was, in our view, a job well done.

All in all, we fared quite well in comparison to those who lived in communities immediately surrounding Taal lake and the volcano. We know a family in Silang who are sharing their home with 7 other families of relatives from the town Lemery who are just now returning to their homes to try and make them liveable. 
Some homes were literally crushed from the weight of the ash.  Many lost everything.

We are counting our blessings and hoping that the volcano will now rest for another 40 years or more as life is returning to normal for many of us. For others its silence at least allows them to try and rebuild and clean up the horrendous mess the eruption left behind.

TeeJay4103 :

Our home is about 18km from the volcano.  We did not know of the eruption for about two hours until a friend living in the SM Wind condos just across the highway from the ridge overlooking the volcano sent us a pic and told us of the eruption.

We went to the back of our home and looked out to see the volcanic cloud rising in the sky, the lighting, and the huge cloud of ash heading our way.  At that time we also began to feel the stronger of the 100's of earthquakes that were occurring and then the ash began to fall.

That day through the following morning we accumulated about 2 inches of ash on our home and the scenery around us was like something out of a Hollywood movie.  Gray, bleak and desolate, though the winds had changed direction and the ashfall had ceased.
During that time we also lost power and water, though the water was restored within about 2 hours or so.

The greenery around the house was destroyed and we began the cleanup. We hired a crew of three to clean the roof, gutters, and fences. It took about three days for them to do a good cleanup and washing of the roof, etc..
We then began cleaning the rest of the mess ourselves, The dust was bad for about a week and the house and area around had to be cleaned over and over.

We had no power for about a week, though we had emergency lighting, candles and plenty of batteries. We heated water on the stove for a warm and welcome shower and made the best of it. 
Without power, it became necessary to begin cooking everything in the refrigerator,  we had plenty of hot home-cooked meals. 

Meralco, we found out, had trouble restoring power because of the accumulation of ash on the insulators on every power pole and transformer. The ash had a high iron content and was causing shorts and arcing, so every insulator had to be cleaned before power could be restored. A monstrous job and to have power back in a week was, in our view, a job well done.

All in all, we fared quite well in comparison to those who lived in communities immediately surrounding Taal lake and the volcano. We know a family in Silang who are sharing their home with 7 other families of relatives from the town Lemery who are just now returning to their homes to try and make them liveable. 
Some homes were literally crushed from the weight of the ash.  Many lost everything.

We are counting our blessings and hoping that the volcano will now rest for another 40 years or more as life is returning to normal for many of us. For others its silence at least allows them to try and rebuild and clean up the horrendous mess the eruption left behind.

Teejay4103;

Many thanks for the update

Wow... '18km' fm the volcano that itself seems so very close to the epicentre. It must have been a real tough time for all at home.
Its pretty shocking to hear that you managed to stay in-doors throughout the eruption, and carry on with your daily activities. Well I guess being at a safer distance in structurally sturdy house, and also being well prepared/stocked up for such emergencies made all the difference., and Kudos to the Meralco power for restoring electricity within a week.
This should be a good reminder to all of us that things do happen, & being well prepared cannot be taken lightly.

Hang in there, better days are coming. Hope you & fmly feel a little better every day.

Manwonder

Many thanks for the update

Wow... '18km' fm the volcano that itself seems so very close to the epicentre. It must have been a real tough time for all at home.
Its pretty shocking to hear that you managed to stay in-doors throughout the eruption, and carry on with your daily activities. Well I guess being at a safer distance in structurally sturdy house, and also being well prepared/stocked up for such emergencies made all the difference., and Kudos to the Meralco power for restoring electricity within a week.
This should be a good reminder to all of us that things do happen, & being well prepared cannot be taken lightly.

Hang in there, better days are coming. Hope you & fmly feel a little better every day.

.


While our home may only be 18km from the volcano, we are also at a much higher elevation than the mouth of the volcano, so lava flow is not a concern.
The towns in Batangas surrounding the crater at lower elevations as well as Tagaytay itself being along the north rim are obviously in a much more precarious location than our home.  We also felt only a few of the stronger earthquakes and our home suffered no damage from them as we do not live along any known fault lines. (We investigated before we built).

My wife lived in Imus Cavite during the Mt. Pinatubo eruption. Imus is approximately 160 km from Pinatubo and their home was covered in a thick blanket of ash that was even found in countries outside of the Philippines.

Trying to hide from volcanic ash in the Philippines, in our view, is a bit like trying to hide from sunlight. It's hard to do, and the areas that may not be subjected to ashfall from an eruption are not areas we choose to live in.  We chose the area we are in for many reasons, its higher elevation for cooler air, no fault lines and no flooding were but a few determining factors.  With the mouth of the volcano being at a much lower elevation, ashfall is our only concern as far as the volcano goes.

Thank you for your kind thoughts. We are doing well and we pray for the thousands who are not.

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