Any expats in Germany willing to be interviewed for my thesis?

Hi everybody!

I hope it's alright that I am posting this question here, I did message a moderator about this a few days ago but I never got an answer. If I am breaking any rules by posting, I apologize.

My name is Chris and I am currently studying sociology in Erlangen near Nuremberg. For my bachelor's thesis I am looking to study the home- and work-life concerning expats currently living in Germany and also the conditions for why and how they came to Germany in the first place. As my work would be centered around a qualitative angle I am looking to interview a couple of expats, preferably from the same industry sector as to better draw comparisons, however this is not necessary.

The interviews would most likely be between one and two hours long, depending really on how much you want to talk and they can be conducted either in Person, if you are in the region of Bavaria/Franconia or over the Internet (Skype, Discord etc.). The interviews would be recorded to make analysis easier; the recordings would of course be treated confidentially.

If you are interested in doing such a interview feel free to respond or direct message me; I would be very grateful! Ideally the interviews would be held between the 30.01.20 and the 16.02.20.
Also, again, if this is not the right place to post I apologize and will of course delete this topic.

Kind regards,

Christian

I don't see a problem about such a thing as long as it is legitimate. In the past some people have posted surveys that sounded fairly questionable. But honestly; an hour or two! That sounds excessive. If one is concise and logical then one would expect such a thing might take up to 20 or 30 minutes...

It is absolutely legitimate! And maybe I wasn't clear, this wouldn't be a survey but rather a narrative Interview, meaning no back and forth with questions and short-ish answers but rather a couple of questions requiring longer answers. Put into other words, think of telling a story started by input from myself. The less I talk, the better, honestly.

As to the length, that would be the absolute max! I understand it seems rather long, 45 minutes to an hour would in actuality be more realistic. I put that length because, in theory, such a lengthy interview is possible, however unlikely. Again, this would depend entirely on how long you as the interviewee would want to talk.

I understood it is an interview rather than a survey but it's really a question if people will bother with such a thing if it takes so long. And whether something is legitimate depends on the questions; not to sound too sceptical but every scammer also claims they are legit. Just saying.

I completely understand that it is a rather long time, however I am hoping that people might still be interested, you never know.

Pertaining the legitimacy: I am of course willing to offer a number of options of proof to anyone interested in such an interview, I could take a picture of my student ID and people could, in theory, also contact my tutor at my university. I would need to run this by him but I am sure he wouldn't mind me sharing his contact info.

The home and work life you want to study is probably as diverse as the target group (expats from all over the world live in Germany, after all). What is the (scientific) point of interviewing a small-ish number of them, selected by a potentially biased method, and drawing conclusion from that unrepresentative sample?
I have attended similar interviews a number of time, mostly out of curiosity, and always asked to get a copy of the resulting thesis. Most of them were a waste of time!

I didn't go into a lot of detail, the interview would be concerning aspects of the home and work life but would really mainly focus on the transitional process of coming into Germany and comparing the current life in Germany with the previous life in the home country. I am only interviewing a small number of people as it is a bachelor's thesis and I only have three months in total to complete it. Interviewing a large number of people would of course be better from a scientific point of view but just not feasible in this case I'm afraid.
I would of course be happy to hand out copies of the finished thesis but of course I cannot promise anything grand. Again, as mentioned, this is merely a bachelor's thesis and thus it will probably not constitute groundbreaking research. I don't mean to imply that I will not give it my best, I am however trying to be realistic with it.

Well, I wish you good luck in finding candidates!
(I am German, so don’t qualify.)

Thanks, I appreciate it!

Well I see no shame in that it was a suggestion and who wouldn’t wanna be part of a large theme. I find it epic, contacts available

Thanks Kzman, I have sent you a message.

Some additional info about the thesis, if anybody is interested:

The thesis will focus on structural discrimination towards migrant (i.e. non-German) workers in Germany. Basically, I want to see how attractive of a country Germany is for migrant workers, as in what kind of incentives, if any, are offered to attract workers from outside of Germany. The structural discrimination aspect is reflected in my hypothesis, where I claim that workers with higher education and/or high-skilled workers are more sought after and thus it is made easier for them to work in Germany than for lower educated and/or low-skilled workers. It would not focus on racial discrimination.

Have you studied the rules for non-EU citizens to get a work visa, or the conditions and reasoning for a blue card? It’s obvious that Germany, like virtually every country, looks to attract highly educated people with demanded skills rather than unskilled workers. No secret about that, it’s codified in the rules.  The only hope for such people is either by marrying a EU citizen thus having much easier requirements or getting asylum, integrating, finding work and managing unlimited residency, a settlement permit or citizenship before they might be asked to leave.

Yes of course countries want to attract higher educated workers, I don't aim to ignore this in my thesis. But I aim to explore the topic in more detail and see what exactly non-German workers have to say about the situation. I don't want to give too much away either in order not to influence potential candidates, if that makes any sense.
Also, the question of citizenship and/or unlimited residency, while potentially playing a part in the process, is not necessarily a focus of my research.

TominStuttgart :

Have you studied the rules for non-EU citizens to get a work visa, or the conditions and reasoning for a blue card? It’s obvious that Germany, like virtually every country, looks to attract highly educated people with demanded skills rather than unskilled workers. No secret about that, it’s codified in the rules.  The only hope for such people is either by marrying a EU citizen thus having much easier requirements or getting asylum, integrating, finding work and managing unlimited residency, a settlement permit or citizenship before they might be asked to leave.

I think questioning what his thesis is about or what not or even about what kind of evaluation he had, to come up with his thesis, is not our job, instead his professors'. Neither do I think he's here to debate and be questioned why he is doing what he is doing. He didn't ask for an opinion, instead asked the people in the forum if anyone is interested to be interviewed.

If you're not interested, that's fine. I don't see the need to further question why and how he's doing it. It's absolutely irrelevant.

B

BeZwe :
TominStuttgart :

Have you studied the rules for non-EU citizens to get a work visa, or the conditions and reasoning for a blue card? It’s obvious that Germany, like virtually every country, looks to attract highly educated people with demanded skills rather than unskilled workers. No secret about that, it’s codified in the rules.  The only hope for such people is either by marrying a EU citizen thus having much easier requirements or getting asylum, integrating, finding work and managing unlimited residency, a settlement permit or citizenship before they might be asked to leave.

I think questioning what his thesis is about or what not or even about what kind of evaluation he had, to come up with his thesis, is not our job, instead his professors'. Neither do I think he's here to debate and be questioned why he is doing what he is doing. He didn't ask for an opinion, instead asked the people in the forum if anyone is interested to be interviewed.

If you're not interested, that's fine. I don't see the need to further question why and how he's doing it. It's absolutely irrelevant.

B

That's your opinion and it really doesn't interest me. I gave him you insights on the subject and if you don't like them then that’s your problem. Some people appreciate intelligent feedback. And it was not an attack on him; I really have no idea if he knows much about the official immigration rules concerning this subject. If not, it might be very relevant or at least a good context to start from.

TominStuttgart :
BeZwe :
TominStuttgart :

Have you studied the rules for non-EU citizens to get a work visa, or the conditions and reasoning for a blue card? It’s obvious that Germany, like virtually every country, looks to attract highly educated people with demanded skills rather than unskilled workers. No secret about that, it’s codified in the rules.  The only hope for such people is either by marrying a EU citizen thus having much easier requirements or getting asylum, integrating, finding work and managing unlimited residency, a settlement permit or citizenship before they might be asked to leave.

I think questioning what his thesis is about or what not or even about what kind of evaluation he had, to come up with his thesis, is not our job, instead his professors'. Neither do I think he's here to debate and be questioned why he is doing what he is doing. He didn't ask for an opinion, instead asked the people in the forum if anyone is interested to be interviewed.

If you're not interested, that's fine. I don't see the need to further question why and how he's doing it. It's absolutely irrelevant.

B

That's your opinion and it really doesn't interest me. I gave him you insights on the subject and if you don't like them then that’s your problem. Some people appreciate intelligent feedback. And it was not an attack on him; I really have no idea if he knows much about the official immigration rules concerning this subject. If not, it might be very relevant or at least a good context to start from.

Insights are always great. However, "Intelligent" feedback or insight is not what he asked for, instead a possible interest for an interview. The said "feedback" is deviating from the whole and ONLY purpose of the enquiry. That's all I'm saying.


B

This is an open forum and thus all topics are allowed - whether the OP asked for it or nor.
Personal attacks are, however, forbidden - so please stay in a constructive, factual manner, please!

Let's get back to the OP

Sociologychris

Has asked a simple request.

Hello everyone,

I would like to apologise to the OP, we didn't receive your message. So, for those kinds of request, you have to drop an advert in the Germany classifieds under the testimonies section so that interested members may contact you.

Again, sorry for this late intervention,
Bhavna

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