Ordinary Naturalization - Certificate for Portuguese Language

Hello Expat Team,
Greetings.

I want to apply for Ordinary Naturalization. Can anyone please guide me about the following:

Regarding mandatory requirement of the documents for the Ordinary Naturalization, one of the requirement is about having a Certificate for Proficiency in Portuguese Language, for which the Federal Police requires any one of the following documents (Ref: http://www.pf.gov.br/servicos-pf/imigra … oOrdinaria):

Certificado de:
a) proficiência em língua portuguesa para estrangeiros obtido por meio do Exame Celpe-Bras, realizado pelo Instituto Nacional de Estudos e Pesquisas Educacionais Anísio Teixeira - INEP;
b) conclusão em curso de ensino superior ou pós-graduação, realizado em instituição educacional brasileira, registrada no Ministério da Educação;
c) aprovação no exame da Ordem dos Advogados do Brasil - OAB aplicado pelas unidades seccionais da Ordem dos Advogados do Brasil;
d) conclusão de curso de idioma português direcionado a imigrantes realizado em instituição de ensino superior reconhecida pelo Ministério da Educação; ou
e) aprovação em avaliação da capacidade de comunicação em língua portuguesa aplicado por instituição de ensino superior reconhecida pelo Ministério da Educação na qual seja oferecido curso de idioma mencionado na alínea "d";



Ques 1: Please suggest for the points  "b" and "d" which Brazilian Universities are eligible and what kind of Portuguese language course can be done from there, in order to fulfill the requirements OR is it mandatory to obtain the certificate from "Celpe-Bras" only as mentioned under the point "a".

Ques 2: If one manages to fulfill all the requirements for Ordinary Naturalization, by what time he/she can expect the visit from the Federal Police.

I will be grateful if someone can guide me on this.

Kind regards,

Atysri

Atyrsi,

1.) Item (b) refers to obtaining a Bachelor's, Master's, or Doctoral degree from a Brazilian university:  this is obviously a multi-year process, and one that includes mastery of the Portuguese Language as a requirement for entry into a degree program.  A degree from any Brazilian public university would qualify, as well as one from a private university recognized by the Ministry of Education; in this case, the diploma is the required document.  Any private university should be able to provide proof of this recognition to an applicant on demand.  Without that recognition, the course is a waste of time and money.

Item (d) refers to Portuguese for Immigrants courses offered by the same institutions noted above.  Your safest bet is a course offered at a public university in your area.  As a practical matter, since the adoption of the CelpeBras examination, most of these courses tend to be structured around the requirements of CelpeBras, and a principal goal of the course is to prepare the student to take and pass CelpeBras at the end.

2.) Timing for the visit from the Federal Police will vary from region to region, depending on office staffing levels and other police duties.  Once an application is accepted, it's likely to take months for the Federal Police to visit.  My application was accepted in April 2019, and the Federal Police visit took place eight months later, in December.  I'm in Manaus, and the Federal Police here are very occupied with the Venezuelan refugee crisis; still, I doubt that São Paulo will be much faster.

After the Federal Police visit, though, things can move very quickly.  Approval of my application was published in the Diário Oficial da União less than a week later.

Hello Abthree,

I am so very grateful for your time. Thank you for your assistance with this matter.

Best regards,

Atysri

Hi

Do you think that a person who has temporary CRNM in Brazil for more than 4 years based on doctoral studies in a public university (studying yet) he can apply for ordinary naturalization without getting permanent CNRM?

Thanks

El Hasan,

My reading of the regulations is that
(a.) Once you complete an undergraduate or postgraduate program in a public university, your diploma may be accepted as documenting your proficiency in Portuguese, in place of CelpeBras, or
(b.) If you took and passed a Portuguese for Foreigners course from a public university in order to qualify for an undergraduate or postgraduate program, the certificate from that course documenting your successful completion may be accepted, or
(c.) If your university offers a recognized course as described in (b.) above, and waived it after evaluating your proficiency in Portuguese,  the documentation of your evaluation may be accepted, if it grades both your writing and speaking proficiency.

atysri :

Hello Abthree,

I am so very grateful for your time. Thank you for your assistance with this matter.

Best regards,

Atysri

You're very welcome.   Best of luck to you!

I haven´t heard of a case where a temporary resident visa granted due to studies in Brazil could go direct to naturalization. That was granted (temporary) due to the length of the study involved. Residency in Brazil for 4 years indeed is a requirement for naturalization but with a permanent resident visa (CRNM) already granted. Like a chain of command, you go from permanent resident visa of 4 years unless of course married to a Brazilian which is 1 year then to naturalization in which Portuguese proficiency is a requirement. A visit to the Policia Federal would help clarify if he is indeed qualified for naturalization. Of course if anyone has evidence to the contrary, please come forward to illuminate us. I would research it but I´m preparing for a week´s trip to the mountains so I would let our friends here at the forum help out!

robal

Sorry, El Hassan,

This thread is about the Certificate for Proficiency in Portuguese, so I misread your question as being about that.

Robal is right:  there is no way to bootstrap a Student Visa, which is temporary by definition, into permanent status.   To become a permanent resident eligible for naturalization, you'll need to be sponsored by a Brazilian employer,  make a substantial investment in Brazil, or marry a Brazilian.

Thanks for details!

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