Brexit immigration reform to see low-skilled migrants

Not looking good for low skilled workers even from other EU countries.

Low-skilled migrants are likely to be banned from moving to Britain at the end of this year after the Government moved forwards its plans for a new immigration system.

The UK will have the power to end free movement and set its own rules on migration at the end of the Brexit transition period, which runs until 31 December.

The Government was previously expected to keep the current rules in place for a further two years, before introducing a "points-based" system which would make it almost impossible for less skilled migrants to work in the UK.

But ministers are now planning to set up the new system as soon as the transition has ended. A No10 official told the Sunday Telegraph: "We need to deliver change and businesses need to be prepared for uncontrolled migration of low-skilled workers to end this year."

Australian immigration system
The move comes as the Government faces a Brexit battle in the House of Lords, with peers expected to back an amendment restoring the rights of child refugees to come to Britain.

The new migration system will be based on Australia's, where the national origin of would-be migrants is not taken into account and instead applicants are given points based on their educational qualifications, salary and what job they want to do in Britain. It is almost certain to exclude those planning to take lower-skilled jobs such as cleaning.

Critics attacked the Government for trying to introduce an entirely new system on a tight timescale. Shadow Home Secretary Diane Abbott said: "This is an ill-informed and reactionary policy that will damage us all, damaging to everything from the NHS to other public services and some of our key private sector industries."

Liberal Democrat MP Christine Jardine added: "Decisions like this make it loud and clear that this Conservative Government has no intention off ending the hostile environment. It's a national embarrassment. For business and our economy, such draconian changes to immigration rules is utterly unworkable. To think the Home Office could implement the changes in the time given is a joke."

Business groups had previously asked for more time to implement the reform, claiming it would take time for them to change their hiring practices. Over the weekend Sajid Javid rubbished claims by firms that they have not had enough warning of the upcoming changes to Britain's regulatory regime after Brexit.

On Monday the Withdrawal Agreement Bill will face its first votes in the House of Lords. Although peers are certain to approve the legislation, they are likely to insert an amendment which gives unaccompanied child refugees the right to join family members in the UK.

The Government has insisted it will protect refugee rights in a separate bill later this year.

Source: inews.co.uk

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