American Citizen Moving to Brazil with Brazilian boyfriend

I have lots of questions, but I'll try to keep things organized.

Background:

I'm a US citizen that teaches English online, which is how I met my boyfriend. He works remotely as a programmer. I've visited him in Brazil. Now he is in the US visiting my family. We have decided that I will go back to Brazil with him and get married, along with my ESA dog. This process has been a bit overwhelming and we haven't even arrived in Brazil yet. So, any help or advice is GREATLY appreciated.

Questions:

-We plan on applying for permanent residency for me through being a domestic union. Has anyone done this before? Or is this only possible through marriage?


I've read lots of info about marriage in Brazil. However, I'm confused about the documents I need to bring and what steps I need to take in order to have them verified by the Brazilian Embassy in the United States.

For example, I read a post saying that I would need to get my birth certificate and divorce decree reissued and verified within 180 days of applying for marriage in Brazil, in order for the Brazilian government to recognize it as valid.

Does anyone have experience with this, or has been through this process?

Any advice or help is greatly appreciated. Thank you for taking the time to read my post.

EtayC :

I have lots of questions, but I'll try to keep things organized.

Background:

I'm a US citizen that teaches English online, which is how I met my boyfriend. He works remotely as a programmer. I've visited him in Brazil. Now he is in the US visiting my family. We have decided that I will go back to Brazil with him and get married, along with my ESA dog. This process has been a bit overwhelming and we haven't even arrived in Brazil yet. So, any help or advice is GREATLY appreciated.

Questions:

-We plan on applying for permanent residency for me through being a domestic union. Has anyone done this before? Or is this only possible through marriage?


I've read lots of info about marriage in Brazil. However, I'm confused about the documents I need to bring and what steps I need to take in order to have them verified by the Brazilian Embassy in the United States.

For example, I read a post saying that I would need to get my birth certificate and divorce decree reissued and verified within 180 days of applying for marriage in Brazil, in order for the Brazilian government to recognize it as valid.

Does anyone have experience with this, or has been through this process?

Any advice or help is greatly appreciated. Thank you for taking the time to read my post.

You will need a lot of things to accomplish that. First you have to declare and formalize your stable union at a cartório in Brazil. This can be done extrajudicially or judicially with the help of a lawyer, outlining responsibilities and property divisions. You will need your CPF and RG (or passport) plus witnesses.

https://www.proteste.org.br/seus-direit … ecessarios

Documents needed to have your CRNM (permanent visa) through stable union:

http://www.pf.gov.br/servicos-pf/imigra … 20familiar

Autorização de residência com base em reunião familiar:

1 - Certidão de nascimento ou casamento para comprovação do parentesco entre o requerente e o brasileiro ou imigrante beneficiário de autorização de residência, ou documento hábil que comprove o vínculo;
2 - Documento de identidade do brasileiro ou imigrante beneficiário de autorização de residência, com o qual o requerente deseja a reunião;
3 - Declaração, sob as penas da lei, de que o familiar chamante reside no Brasil; e
4 - Comprovante de dependência econômica, em se tratando de irmão maior de dezoito anos de brasileiro ou de imigrante beneficiário de autorização de residência.

If you were divorced, a divorce decree need to be apostilled and translated in Brazil to Portuguese.
If single, a birth certificate. Other info states you also need a criminal background check. Please verify that.

How´s your Portuguese?

https://www.justica.gov.br/seus-direito … ermanencia

Good luck!

Thank you so much for your help!

You´re very welcome.

Good afternoon . 1st I would recommend contacting the Brazilian consulate to get as much info as possible . Much can be done online to gather info but, a trip (if possible ) to the consulate will get you the best/most accurate info .
You will need all required American documents translated into Portuguese (If done in the USA) by an official tranlator service (IIRC it gets an impressed seal /stamp , as I recall) . its been years since I did this ,so please double check everything I am posting . You will need all Original USA Documents . NO COPIES . They will not be accepted , unless things have changed . No oiginal docs can cause a lot of headaches ... and you get nothing done .

Yes , Original Brith certificate . You may need info about your Mother /Father (as best as you can remember) For getting a CPF . Many things require a CPF , without it you can do it ....  Like buying stuff greater then a small value ... shipoping stuff bought online ,etc.

Then ,I beleive you need to prove you are/will be, living here . Which of those documents you will need  exactly ?  I am not sure . Your Boyfriend will need to produce those . along with all his Brazilian ID and paper work , bills and such . (electric,water, telephone  all are accepted )  Having a water bill in your name will go a long way .. But 1 of those 3 is just as good .
Try and get your Permanent Residence card asap .

IMO , if you are to get married , doing that in both Counties will make everything much easier .
In Brazil have tyour boyfriend talk with some of the people who work at a few of the agencys who you will be using . they could hepl you the most in getting everything in order to move ahead

Drivers License .... will call for many of the same docs .
What we did ,here is I put some bills in my name ,to beable to show I live here for enough time . IIRC I needed to show many months of bills (6 ?) to get mine plus the other docs including a valid USA State issued Lisecne .  PLus pass the 2/3? IDR , written tests (sorry No English ,and had nothing about driving in them . No BS ... lol!!!) I also was verbally interviewed .

I am not knowagable about  the other method besides being married . So Hopefullt others will chime in and help .

Depending upon where you will be in Brazil , it can make the process faster (if In a smaller city) or slower if you ae in  bigger city ....

Best of Luck and keep us updated .

HI, Etay,

Applying for residency in Brazil is a two-step process:

1. While in the United States, you should apply for a VITEM XI visa, the temporary visa for family reunion, at the Brazilian Consulate General responsible for your city of residence in the United States.  Your profile says "Birmingham", but it doesn't say which Birmingham.  If you're in Alabama, you need the Brazilian Consulate General in Atlanta; if you're in Michigan, you need the Brazilian Consulate General in Chicago.  The Brazilians are particular about applying at the correct Consulate, and the requirements of each can be a little different, so check the requirements of the Consulate that serves your state for their documentation requirements for a VITEM XI visa.  They should also be able to give you authoritative guidance about how to move your dog to Brazil. 
Brazilian Consulates in the United States accept official documents in English, without translation.

2. After arriving in Brazil, you will need to request Authorization for Residency and an ID Card (CRNM) from the Federal Police in the city and state where you will be living. The list of the required documents is the one provided by Robal above.  All official documents that you submit will need to be translated into Portuguese by a Sworn Translator.  This can and should be done in Brazil:  unofficial translations are not accepted.  There are local Sworn Translators in all states, and also online services that will work with PDFs.
Documents no longer need to be legalized at a Brazilian Consulate for presentation to the Federal Police.  They do, however, require an apostille, an official attachment from the issuing authority confirming their authenticity.  Documents issued under the authority of a state, including county and municipal authorities, require an apostille from that state.  Documents issued by the Federal Government, including your FBI Background Check, require an apostille from the US Department of State.  Be sure to ask the right authority for the right apostilles:  sending your documents to the wrong one will result in them being returned to you, with needless delay.  Apostilles are attached to documents in such a way that removing them will destroy the documents, so be sure to make any copies you want to keep before having apostilles attached.  Passports carry their own authority, and do not require apostilles.
Obtaining your FBI Background Check from an Approved Channeler rather than directly from the FBI is usually a good move, if at all possible.  The wait time is in days rather than months, and Approved Channelers can usually provide you with both a hard copy and an electronic copy, which can be used to obtain a State Department apostille from an apostille service.  Try to obtain duplicate originals, since you'll probably need this document for both your visa and for the Federal Police.

As soon as possible after you arrive in Brazil, it's a good idea to go to the Receita Federal (Federal Revenue Office) and obtain a Brazilian Taxpayer ID, a CPF (Cadastro de Pessoa Física).  You don't need to be a permanent resident to obtain a CPF, and it makes many things easier in Brazil, down to getting a cellphone number.

I had brought a dog in from the US many years ago ,iirc 2004/5 . What I recall is a special Vet (who is authorized to do this) must clear the dog after inspection of the dog(IIRC) and the paper work about it  and its' up to date injections(1 appointment and return to get the paper work ,maybe now downloadable online ???) . You can find them listed online or the consulate may have listing of a few in your area .

As I recall once I had all the paper work  , I had to dropped it off at a USDA port of inspection (It was at the Airport , Miami for me ,,don't quote me on it's USDA ,  since it's been many years now) They give you the clearance papers need for the Airline and entrance into Brazil (which iirc ,you need to return to get). Not difficult to do .A few days ,which is well worth the effort ,imo ... I had a GREAT dog... Miss him

abthree :

Obtaining your FBI Background Check from an Approved Channeler rather than directly from the FBI is usually a good move, if at all possible.  The wait time is in days rather than months, and Approved Channelers can usually provide you with both a hard copy and an electronic copy, which can be used to obtain a State Department apostille from an apostille service.  Try to obtain duplicate originals, since you'll probably need this document for both your visa and for the Federal Police.

Just a quick update on the FBI background check (Identity History Summary). You can now submit a request electronically here: https://www.edo.cjis.gov/ (more details here: https://www.fbi.gov/services/cjis/ident … ary-checks )

You then send in your fingerprints and it only takes 3-5 business days to get your electronic copy.

As abthree mentioned, you'll then need the apostille from the State Department. Here is their website: https://travel.state.gov/content/travel … vices.html

I was lucky and able to drop it off in person and it just took 3 business days ($8). The website says a mail-in request takes 12 business days, so it might be worth it to hire an apostille service to do this step for you.

Good luck!

We did this years ago. The process of marriage in Brazil is more complicated so we married in the U.S.  We had to go to the local consulate to register our marriage, but being married before we got there made some things easier.

Ask about the current process with the consulate before following my advice.

We were in the process of marriage in BR, while awaiting some documents (Birth Cert "long form") from US, we travel to Las Vegas and married there in less than an hour. Came back to Brazil, went to Cartorio to check on status, showed US marriage Cert Which was legalized. They said " "well  no more waiting", went to another area and they married us.
Well worth $,  the vacation and had all done with law office in Vegas and was sent to BR just after we returned. All this help with my CRNM.
Be really sure you are ready to marry, if so, it is worth a trip to Vegas, but be sure Brazil is for you! It is not Kansas Toto!
Tough really on spouse to help with speaking and stuff. Few time I questioned myself about being an expat, but made friends and good tutor and calmed me down. Going on 7 years now.
Think about driving. Gas is expensive, license take a bit of extra time and cars are very expensive.............

We were married in the US as well, in 2017.  When the US Marriage Certificate is registered at the responsible Brazilian Consulate,  they give you a  "Certidâo" that the cartório in Brazil is required to accept as authoritative, and register your marriage without any runarounds. 

The time in the States is also valuable for quickly getting together the documents needed for the Federal Police, especially a fresh FBI Background Check  (from an Approved Channeler) and apostilles.

Thank you everyone for your responses. We decided go ahead and get married in the United States. Like many of you said, this made the process a bit easier. Now, I will apply for the VITEM XI Visa at the Brazilian Consulate in the US. Again, thank you all so much for the advice! It is greatly appreciated.

Great choice. Be sure to register your marriage at the consulate.

Congratulations, and best of luck to you both!

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