Retiring in brazil

According to my research so far, For a foreigner to be qualified to retire In Brazil he/she should be at least 60 years old and have a verifiable stable monthly pension of $2000 amongst other requirements.
I also saw a quotation of $200000, which I don't really understand. So my questions are...

1. Does having maybe a savings of up to $200000 or more and above 60years qualify you for a permanent visa(viper)?

2. In a case where a non citizen and non resident man or woman at 60 or above 60 is not enrolled in any form of pension scheme but has a child who is financially stable enough to provide the required $2000 or more to his parent monthly, can such parent qualify for a permanent visa as a retiree?

3. Are there specific countries that are eligible to be able to retire in Brazil? If so what countries are eligible and what countries are not.

4. If the consulate general of Brazil in your country doesn't have provision for application of permanent visa on their website does this mean you cannot retire in Brazil even if you meet up with the requirements?

5. Can one first get into Brazil via tourist or visitor visa and then apply for retirement visa or permanent visa while in brazil?

6. Finally what are the requirements for foreigners retiring in Brazil? official links will be appreciated.

Please, anyone with any idea on any of the above points should help out with answers as soon as possible, thanks in advance.

Brazil used to have a retirement visa, but it no longer does.  It was eliminated in the 2017 rewrite of the immigration laws.   Any retirement visas granted before November 2017 continue to be honored, but no new ones have been or will be granted.  The information that you've found referring to one is outdated.  Most consulates have updated their websites by now, which is why you don't see it.
In the Western Hemisphere, several Caribbean nations still offer retirement visas:  you may want to research them.

Chiggz :

According to my research so far, For a foreigner to be qualified to retire In Brazil he/she should be at least 60 years old and have a verifiable stable monthly pension of $2000 amongst other requirements.
I also saw a quotation of $200000, which I don't really understand. So my questions are...

1. Does having maybe a savings of up to $200000 or more and above 60years qualify you for a permanent visa(viper)?

2. In a case where a non citizen and non resident man or woman at 60 or above 60 is not enrolled in any form of pension scheme but has a child who is financially stable enough to provide the required $2000 or more to his parent monthly, can such parent qualify for a permanent visa as a retiree?

3. Are there specific countries that are eligible to be able to retire in Brazil? If so what countries are eligible and what countries are not.

4. If the consulate general of Brazil in your country doesn't have provision for application of permanent visa on their website does this mean you cannot retire in Brazil even if you meet up with the requirements?

5. Can one first get into Brazil via tourist or visitor visa and then apply for retirement visa or permanent visa while in brazil?

6. Finally what are the requirements for foreigners retiring in Brazil? official links will be appreciated.

Please, anyone with any idea on any of the above points should help out with answers as soon as possible, thanks in advance.

The $200,000 you saw was for an investor´s visa which entitled someone to a permanent resident visa. It has now went up to $500,000.

Money talks. You can buy your way to multiple passports at multiple latitudes from north to south and east and west coordinates. Try the Dominican Republic. They even sell citizenhip.

It would not work under old law. You would have to show proof of funds in an account with minimum. I Look into such way back and could not risk such.
what would happen if God forbid something happen and no funds.
Change's in latitude, change's in attitude...........

Oh wow, I didn't know citizenship is sold anywhere, thank you

Abthree,
Thank you so much, I'll check them out.

Abthree,
Thank you so much, I'll check them out.

Chiggz :

Abthree,
Thank you so much, I'll check them out.

Three that I know for sure:

- Belize (former British Honduras), which is English-speaking;
- Panama, Spanish-speaking, but has many English speakers;
- Costa Rica.

And there are others.

abthree :
Chiggz :

Abthree,
Thank you so much, I'll check them out.

Three that I know for sure:

- Belize (former British Honduras), which is English-speaking;
- Panama, Spanish-speaking, but has many English speakers;
- Costa Rica.

And there are others.

I can escalate that to 10 countries I know - from the cheapest to the most expensive  to obtain citizenship by investment. UK being the most expensive requiring $2.5million. Antigua & Barbuda at
$100,000 like Dominica. St Kitts & Nevis - $150,000... etc.

Panama and Costa Rica have their "pensionado" program at low income requirements and so with Mexico. Belize I know they have the investor´s visa. I´m not sure how their retirement program works. Portugal´s golden visa leading to citizenship requires a 500,000 euro investment. Malta is very favorable and I´m also studying that.

But as Tex said change of latitude = change of attitude. For all you know I might end up being buried in Brazil due to that detestable and somewhat scary change of attitude! Old habits never die!

robal

Thanks robal, i have done a little research on panama and i like the country but the down side is that there's no embassy consulate in my country.
Is there a way to go around this, like maybe going to another country first then getting the visa there, i am interested in the pensionado offer.
Also most websites i can find have datas of about 2-3 years or older, its nice to have the most recent laws and information on general living. Any recent sites you have will be of great help. Thank you

Chiggz :

Thanks robal, i have done a little research on panama and i like the country but the down side is that there's no embassy consulate in my country.
Is there a way to go around this, like maybe going to another country first then getting the visa there, i am interested in the pensionado offer.
Also most websites i can find have datas of about 2-3 years or older, its nice to have the most recent laws and information on general living. Any recent sites you have will be of great help. Thank you

There is a Panamanian Embassy in Nabuja.

https://www.panama-offshore-services.co … ogram.htm. Read up
on their requirements.

Embassy contact: https://embassyabuja.com/contact-us/

robal

Thanks a lot robal, is it legally acceptable to get the pensionado from another countries embassy?

Actually there is no embassy in abuja,I checked that site initially, when you get to the embassy address page it says there is no embassy.

Really? Have you tried to contact them through the link I gave you? If there´s no more embassy normally there´s another embassy that would represent them in the area where they don´t operate.

Chiggz :

Thanks a lot robal, is it legally acceptable to get the pensionado from another countries embassy?

If that country has the nearest Panamanian Embassy or Consulate to your place of residence, then yeah. That should be legal as long as they recognize Nigeria as their jurisdiction on consular affairs.

You might want to checkout Ecuador if you have your heart set on Latin America, the income required is much lower or the investment required is $25,000.  Learn Spanish instead of Portuguese, the currency is the US dollar, so less risk of money problems.

mugtech :

You might want to checkout Ecuador if you have your heart set on Latin America, the income required is much lower or the investment required is $25,000.  Learn Spanish instead of Portuguese, the currency is the US dollar, so less risk of money problems.

There were protests a month back due to the suspension of fuel subsidy by the president of Ecuador.
Cars are expensive. Food is cheap though and the weather is perfect all year round. If I were to settle there it would be in Cuenca.

But for now, Bolsonaro´s admin is doing very well with fighting the budget deficit. They´re trying to
overhaul the antiquated tax collection; more steps toward privatization of state owned entities; now more strict with fiscal discipline etc. I just hope he´ll make amends with his threat to create a new currency with the ratio of 1:1 against the dollar.

I agree with most of what Bolsonaro says but the idea of being 1:1 with the dollar straight away doesn’t seem to make sense. What exactly about Brazil’s economy could justify such a thing?  Seems to me that the exchange rate would need a gradual improvement over time to be realistic.

KenAquarius :

I agree with most of what Bolsonaro says but the idea of being 1:1 with the dollar straight away doesn’t seem to make sense. What exactly about Brazil’s economy could justify such a thing?  Seems to me that the exchange rate would need a gradual improvement over time to be realistic.

The fact that Brazil´s real has been losing value against the dollar has been an awakening for Bolsonaro´s admin. Their indebtedness denominated in dollars means that they have to pay more reais for every dollar they owe now is not palatable to the current administration. I´m sure you noticed
that they really has not been so active in swapping their dollars to counteract the dollar´s rise. This they said is done purposely so they can liquidate a lot of their local internal debts.

If the past like the emergence of the reais, the ratio of 1:1 was applied. This is one of the measures
of governments to evade responsibilities to pay indebtedness in real dollars. It´s like debasing the dollar - now less reais to pay the dollar indebtedness. They have changed currency eight times during the 50yr period. Why not the 9th?

robal

I guess understanding currency evaluation/manipulation is better left to those who understand such things. It would seem that what people placing such a value on the currency might be good in some aspects it would hurt in others, specifically in foreign investment. But l suppose shooting oneself in the foot is better that shooting oneself in the head.

KenAquarius :

But l suppose shooting oneself in the foot is better that shooting oneself in the head.

Are those the only choices?  Why not get out of town, no shooting involved.

Just a figure of speech. What l meant was that while one might cause some discomfort in the short run, it’s better than the alternative.

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