Expat interest in politics in Brazil

Hello everyone,

As an expat, your day-to-day life in Brazil is impacted by decision-making at the political level in your host country as well as in your country of origin. We would like to know how involved you think expats should be in the political day-to-day of either their host or home country?

Can expats vote during elections which take place in their country of origin? Can you do so online or through embassies/consulates in Brazil?

What is the administrative process which has been set up in Brazil to enable expats to vote in their country of origin?

To which extent should political life in Brazil include expats and their concerns? Should they be more active as a community to make their voices heard?

Are there any precautionary measures to observe during election period in your host country? Any local prohibitions?

Do you keep up with politics in Brazil?

Thanks for sharing your experience.

Bhavna

I do keep up with politics in Brazil but only as a precaution of anything bad that may occur and affects my well-being as an expat. I don´t discuss or talk about it with other people because it creates troubles or other problems.

They Consulate and embassy's notify me at election time in home country and assist with registration.
Yes I monitor both home and in Brazil as to politics and taxes as said which may affect me.

robal :

I do keep up with politics in Brazil but only as a precaution of anything bad that may occur and affects my well-being as an expat. I don´t discuss or talk about it with other people because it creates troubles or other problems.

Same Boat, I was warned about the Passion of Brasilian Politics....it's like Religion I stay far away...I just stay abreast of the Political Climate and it is allways "HOT"....Need to know  when to Skidaddle....

As a guest in Brazil, I don't feel it appropriate to comment too much on local politics.  It's sort of like commenting on people's relatives while a guest in their home:  THEY may be able to criticize the cousins, but may take it amiss from outsiders.   There's also a strain of xenophobia in Brazilian culture that's usually kept just below the surface, but it's best not to bring out.

With respect to home politics in the US, degree of participation depends on the expat's residence status.   There's no voting at diplomatic facilities, because in the US elections are the responsibility of the states, not the Federal Government.   Expats who retain residences in the US can vote a normal, complete absentee ballot, containing all offices and candidates, provided by their home election officials,  by mail. 

I understand that for expats like me, who don't maintain a US residence, the last state where we resided will provide a special mail-in ballot on request, that includes the candidates for President and Vice President only.

I totally agree with robal, like people will ask me what i think about brazilian politics all the time, default canned response is - I love being here, but its not my place to decide for brazilians who should run their country.

I do enjoy keeping a low profile on everything, keeps things simpler. as for back home in canada. because im not there - i feel that i should not contribute to voting as its a bit of a rhetoric  issue as im not invested there.

Until fairly recently I haven't really paid much attention to Brazilian politics. Not really my place other than to know if I should watch my back when out and about. I've gotten the picture of "Welcome to Brazil. Thank you for your dollars. Keep out of our business."

I get something of the same reaction when commenting about American politics: "What business is it of yours? You  don't live here anymore!" Mostly from supporters of the purveyor of a certain Made in China red hat. Quite a few of them even think I lost my U.S. citizenship (automatically) when I moved here.

I arranged for my absentee fax- or mail-in ballot before I moved here in 2012. I vote because it does affect me. 99% of my income is from U.S. sources and I still have to pay taxes, which have gone up since 2016 for me as a small business owner.

Mike in São Paulo :

Until fairly recently I haven't really paid much attention to Brazilian politics. Not really my place other than to know if I should watch my back when out and about. I've gotten the picture of "Welcome to Brazil. Thank you for your dollars. Keep out of our business."

I get something of the same reaction when commenting about American politics: "What business is it of yours? You  don't live here anymore!" Mostly from supporters of the purveyor of a certain Made in China red hat. Quite a few of them even think I lost my U.S. citizenship (automatically) when I moved here.

I arranged for my absentee fax- or mail-in ballot before I moved here in 2012. I vote because it does affect me. 99% of my income is from U.S. sources and I still have to pay taxes, which have gone up since 2016 for me as a small business owner.

Hi Mike. Long time no hear. Nice to see you back at the forum.

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