Divorce ( Permanent Visa & Permanent Residence)

So true Doc. Lines are crazy in small towns too. Many see medico, then have to go to lab which has pref for those having insurance. Makes me feel bad that many sit waiting and I show and go. (now all are processed and I wait to be called the verify and sign lab work, but then I get lab's done)
Many wait for weeks to see a specialist. Many specialists (if not all) have private practice, but SUS has to wait until specialist are working the SUS clinic.

May need to move to "new" post on retirement info. May be hidden as is.

Texanbrazil :

Great information.
I agree with medical insurance being an obstacle. Depending on age and rate increase, premiums will take a good percentage of the minimum $2K U$D.
Cannot rely on SUS it appears.

No, looks like no one who expects to rely on SUS will be approved.
If I were trying to get in on this visa, I'd sign up for a qualifying plan in my own country, then after I had my CRNM, I'd cancel the expensive foreign policy, and sign up for a local private plan.  Here in the North, someone 65 years old can get a good plan for R$800-900 a month.  That should still satisfy the requirement, and not break the bank.

For 65 and above in RS, you can find premiums to even R$500 a month.

Not me. Almost 2K ($R) for me here.

Texanbrazil :

Not me. Almost 2K ($R) for me here.

You have an expensive plan. Is that normal in Paraná? The regional ones are usually cheaper.

robal

There are 3. Only one regional which is $R200/cheaper, but  can not use outside of Foz.
Unimed was first choice, the they exclude every little thing I was treated in US for 2 years. So took middle one in case I need specialist in Curitiba.
Only 3 hospitals including SUS.

I faced a similar choice.

There's a good local program here, but it can't be used outside Manaus,  and we like to travel.  Unimed has a terrible local reputation,  and Amil won't take new members over 63, period.  We tried Cigna for a year, but it was very expensive, and (although they try to deny it) it's a reimbursement program, with no network here that accepts direct payment - unacceptable.

That left us with Hapvida, which is strong in the North and Northeast (headquarters in Fortaleza), and supposedly reimburses in the South and Southeast.   Hope we never need to test them on that; here, the service is good.

I have no issues with Amil, but they will raise rates for me (On a company plan and if less than 10 emp. they raise rates). Accepted in all hospitals here, but when you go for one thing they always want run a lot of unneeded test.
BIL has  Hapvida, and wanted minor surgery here to stay at mom's house, but they do not take it here.

Texanbrazil :

I have no issues with Amil, but they will raise rates for me (On a company plan and if less than 10 emp. they raise rates). Accepted in all hospitals here, but when you go for one thing they always want run a lot of unneeded test.
BIL has  Hapvida, and wanted minor surgery here to stay at mom's house, but they do not take it here.

If memory doesn´t fail me, Amil was bought by United Health. So it´s presumed to be more expensive. I can name 7 providers in RS. So there´s competition and beneficial on costs for consumers.

But after 2 years of living in BR, you get to ask for BR citizenship and if granted getting your own health insurance is not required?

jc1234 :

But after 2 years of living in BR, you get to ask for BR citizenship and if granted getting your own health insurance is not required?

Unclear, at this point.  The Portaria says that residency can be approved for up to two years, and renewal terms will be set in a future Portaria.  Note that this is already an exception to the practice with family reunion that , once a person is 60 or older, residency is approved without an expiration date.

The waiting period for citizenship without a family connection is four years, not two, and citizenship takes about a year (or more) to achieve, so it would require at least one renewal, assuming that the Government decides to grant renewals.

jc1234 :

But after 2 years of living in BR, you get to ask for BR citizenship and if granted getting your own health insurance is not required?

Once you´re already a permanent resident, I have not seen any laws requiring anyone to have a health insurance. The SUS will have to take care of you citizen or not.

robal

robal :

Once you´re already a permanent resident, I have not seen any laws requiring anyone to have a health insurance. The SUS will have to take care of you citizen or not.

robal

I imagine that this is one reason that the Portaria limits the approval period to two years,  and that the terms of renewal will only be published later:  to ensure that the people who benefit from its terms continue to conform to what seems to be the clear intent of the policy. 

This is a big country, and it's often not that hard to evade the rules, at least in the short run.  When renewal time comes up, and individuals who have canceled their insurance and tried to rely on SUS in violation of the policy need to justify their decision to the Federal Police, that's where the rubber will meet the road.  I wouldn't want to be that test case, but I've never been willing to just trust to luck.

It´s not good to rely on SUS by the way especially if you constantly need medical care for serious reasons. Just the line alone can kill you. Better to opt for the local Brazilian providers, whether you´re a citizen or not. A $2000USD monthly that they require should be sufficient to cover the insurance. A R$500 monthly premium if about 60 years old is about 120USD. R$800 about 192USD...

robal

Once you´re a citizen, you don´t have to see a doctor and live in a cave if that´s what you want.  :lol:

I was told by agency that I need to live in BR for 1 year to get my citizenship if married to a Brazilian. But living in BR is not possible for me now anyway. Its obvious as the economy grows stronger so will it broader controls.

robal :

It´s not good to rely on SUS by the way especially if you constantly need medical care for serious reasons. Just the line alone can kill you. Better to opt for the local Brazilian providers, whether you´re a citizen or not. A $2000USD monthly that they require should be sufficient to cover the insurance. A R$500 monthly premium if about 60 years old is about 120USD. R$800 about 192USD...

robal

The 2000 USD requirement has not changed in years. Today 2000 USD is almost R 8600 so R 800 it is affordable but I remembered when the exchange rate was 1.6 which makes it a lot more expensive.

A person with a RNE can get public health care in BR?

They have change the banking regs, now you can transfer $4000 USD/mo into your bank. So retirement is not maxed at $2000, it is the minimum for the ret visa.
Yes and you can sign up with SUS with the protocol, while waiting on your card.
Technically it is public health care and will not turn you away, just may have to wait hours.

I have Unimed it about 2000 Reals Or $471 dollars a month. It’s full coverage used it already for eye surgery. There is a 4 month waiting period you pay the premium before you can start to use it. This insurance is good for all hospitals and district in Brazil. There is a more limited one for just local hospital in your place of residence

NewBrazil :

I have Unimed it about 2000 Reals Or $471 dollars a month. It’s full coverage used it already for eye surgery. There is a 4 month waiting period you pay the premium before you can start to use it. This insurance is good for all hospitals and district in Brazil. There is a more limited one for just local hospital in your place of residence

That's not cheap, are there copays or deductibles?

No co-pays or deductibles

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