Random observations

On the subject of HORNS...
The louder the horn the more respect they get.
It seems that the bigger the vehicle, the louder the horn.
I'll bet if you could put a train horn on your scooter, you would own the road.

Jim-Minh :

I'll bet if you could put a train horn on your scooter, you would own the road.

Believe it or not, I often thought of this.  I doubt that Amazon can ship this one to Vietnam, but you could bring it back on your next trip:  https://www.amazon.com/GAMPRO-Inches-Tr … amp;sr=8-9  I am sure your local hole in the wall scooter repair shop would love to install it.  The only problem might be that you could suffer permanent hearing loss.  It is designed to be installed under the hood (bonnet?) of a car or truck which would somewhat muffle its sound.

Here is a simpler alternative.  Perhaps you could even find something like this in Vietnam, maybe where recreational boating supplies are sold.  https://www.amazon.com/dp/B01NCSJGGC/re … amp;sr=8-6  These things are loud.   :lol:  If someone behind you is honking for you to get out of their way, you could blast this right back at them without even having to look back.

Some of them small trucks & busses have like really annoying horns & they use them constantly, it drives me nuts

I've seen asians leave the stickers on in the US.  In their mind, it keeps the sense of newness.  The "new car smell" equivalent of everything not a car.

Driving is VN is chaos but there are still rules.  People are more aware when driving than in the US.  I've had my cousin drive past 200 people in an intersection and yet somehow managed to spot my aunt.  You get bumps and bruises from accidents but there are usually less serious major accidents.

The trash and littering are things I hate the most.  Even worse when you have crystal clear blue water that lets you see the trash 20 feet below on the seabed.

The politeness is subjective and complex.  Too much to discuss about here.

Freshness by itself adds quality.  The amount of fresh fruits in the Mekong is unbelievable.  I actually hate how they sometimes ruin fresh seafood with over-spicing.  Fruits sent to the US are picked before they are fully ripe to allow for transportation.

And yes, a lot of use of sugar in the Mekong also.  That sugar cane just grows like weed apparently.

Deboning is an art.  Wish VN would learn some of it.  HOWEVER, the US swings too far to the other side and not only debones but defats and over-process and then refats back in for flavor.

Speaking of flavors, VN are able to identify what type of fish or meat they are eating.  In the US, if it's not beef or pork, it's chicken.

videriant :

Speaking of flavors, VN are able to identify what type of fish or meat they are eating.  In the US, if it's not beef or pork, it's chicken.

My niece-by-marriage can tell me the name of every fish, shrimp, crab, snail, squid, clam, and mussel that are sold at the seafood market, and the list of names are very long.

Last month, I made a mistake of saying I wished to order some chicken for Tết.  I was bombarded with questions for replies:  "What type of chicken?  What kind of dishes you want to use it for?  How do you plan to cook that dish?  How soon do you need it?"  When I couldn't come up with an answer, I was given a lengthy lesson on Vietnamese chicken.

There are 12 different types of chicken in Vietnam. 

Gà Ri or gà Ta are from the North and Central;   gà Lùn or gà Tè are from the North;   gà Hồ or gà Tò are from Bắc Ninh (northeast of Hanoi);   gà Đông Tảo are from Hưng Yên (southeast of Hanoi);   gà Mía are from Sơn Tây (a province in Hanoi);   gà Văn Phú are from Phú Thọ (northwest of Hanoi);   gà Đen are from Lào Cai (on the border with China);   gà Lôi are from the Central;   gà Nòi are raised to be gamecocks;   gà Tàu Vàng are from the Mekong Delta;   gà Ác are also from the Mekong Delta but raised only for restorative medicine;   gà Tre are from the South and sometimes kept as pets;   gà Hơ Mông are raised by the Hmong. 

If those 12 types of true Vietnamese chicken are not to your taste, there are also chicken originated in other countries and raised here:   gà Tam Hoàng were from Guangzhou;   gà Hybro were from the Netherlands;   gà Sasso were from France;   gà Lương Phượng were from China;   gà nâu, gà đỏ, gà Hubbard, gà Leghorn, and gà Plymouth were from the US.

Not all chicken should be used for the same dish, I was told.  If you think the French are proud of and particular about their fromage, you haven't had a conversation with a serious Vietnamese cook about Vietnamese chicken.  Go ahead and do that if you want to truly immerse in the culture.  Just make sure you have enough room in your brain to store the trivials that you have no use for -- that is, they're usless until someone like Videriant came along with a comment about chicken ...

Ciambella :

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There are 12 different types of chicken in Vietnam. 

Gà Ri or gà Ta are from the North and Central;   gà Lùn or gà Tè are from the North;   gà Hồ or gà Tò are from Bắc Ninh (northeast of Hanoi);   gà Đông Tảo are from Hưng Yên (southeast of Hanoi);   gà Mía are from Sơn Tây (a province in Hanoi);   gà Văn Phú are from Phú Thọ (northwest of Hanoi);   gà Đen are from Lào Cai (on the border with China);   gà Lôi are from the Central;   gà Nòi are raised to be gamecocks;   gà Tàu Vàng are from the Mekong Delta;   gà Ác are also from the Mekong Delta but raised only for restorative medicine;   gà Tre are from the South and sometimes kept as pets;   gà Hơ Mông are raised by the Hmong. 

If those 12 types of true Vietnamese chicken are not to your taste, there are also chicken originated in other countries and raised here:   gà Tam Hoàng were from Guangzhou;   gà Hybro were from the Netherlands;   gà Sasso were from France;   gà Lương Phượng were from China;   gà nâu, gà đỏ, gà Hubbard, gà Leghorn, and gà Plymouth were from the US.

I was surprised that my wife could distinguish between culrtivated and naturally raised chickens.

But now I know that there are more than 2 varieties.  :idontagree:

Have you ever thought about becoming a Wikipedia author? :)

Andy Passenger :

I was surprised that my wife could distinguish between culrtivated and naturally raised chickens.

But now I know that there are more than 2 varieties.  :idontagree:

Have you ever thought about becoming a Wikipedia author? :)

In my experience, even in the US, almost everyone can intuitively tell the difference between farm-raised and free-range chicken.  The just don't know to look.  And end up confusing the "firmness" of free-range by calling it "tough".

Lets not forget about the other use by Vietnamese of the word chicken, meaning prostitute. That definitely is not your standard farmyard variety.

colinoscapee :

Lets not forget about the other use by Vietnamese of the word chicken, meaning prostitute. That definitely is not your standard farmyard variety.

Maybe the toughest of all...

Ciambella :

There are 12 different types of chicken in Vietnam. 

Gà Ri or gà Ta are from the North and Central;   gà Lùn or gà Tè are from the North;   gà Hồ or gà Tò are from Bắc Ninh (northeast of Hanoi);   gà Đông Tảo are from Hưng Yên (southeast of Hanoi);   gà Mía are from Sơn Tây (a province in Hanoi);   gà Văn Phú are from Phú Thọ (northwest of Hanoi);   gà Đen are from Lào Cai (on the border with China);   gà Lôi are from the Central;   gà Nòi are raised to be gamecocks;   gà Tàu Vàng are from the Mekong Delta;   gà Ác are also from the Mekong Delta but raised only for restorative medicine;   gà Tre are from the South and sometimes kept as pets;   gà Hơ Mông are raised by the Hmong.

Wow, I am impressed. That took some work and it's appreciated.

Observation:

Having the bathroom light switch on the outside wall is annoying and inconvenient, But I understand you can't have switches in a room where virtually everything can get wet.

videriant :

I've seen Asians leave the stickers on in the US.  In their mind, it keeps the sense of newness.  The "new car smell" equivalent of everything not a car.

Wonder if there's a market for knockoff stickers?

New topic