Vietnamese like 'Language exchange' not serious teaching !!

Recently I posted an ad in FB to ask for a Vietnamese Language Teacher to come to my company in Q5 to teach as I cannot go for class due to business.
All I asked is a real teacher with minimum degree in Vietnamese language.
Do you guys think I have some mental problem? :D
Some members in groups commented to ask for chance so I use FB chat function to communicate them. Alas! all of them who contacted me has no degree in Vietnamese language!
I posted very clearly but they just want to try. Of course I cannot accommodate them when I pay. I belief that I have the right to ask for a minimum qualified teacher, right?

Previously, I commented a lot about 'language exchange' here. May be some of you remember :D
Actually, situation is same. They just want 'language exchange' with expatriates which am not interested from the beginning, you know :D


https://i.postimg.cc/13JBrrGx/farmto-table.jpg


I think need to find some schools or agents who outsource teachers!

charmavietnam :

Recently I posted an ad in FB to ask for a Vietnamese Language Teacher to come to my company in Q5 to teach as I cannot go for class due to business.
All I asked is a real teacher with minimum degree in Vietnamese language.
Do you guys think I have some mental problem? :D
Some members in groups commented to ask for chance so I use FB chat function to communicate them. Alas! all of them who contacted me has no degree in Vietnamese language!
I posted very clearly but they just want to try. Of course I cannot accommodate them when I pay. I belief that I have the right to ask for a minimum qualified teacher, right?

I recently posted to a Facebook group that I wanted a THREE bedroom apartment, furnished, with at least two toilets.

EVERY reply I received was for a studio or 1 bedroom or 2 bedroom.

None of them even referred to my request (you know: "Sorry, I don't have what you want, however..."). They just started spamming me with messages about the apartments they do have.

Maybe that's not the same thing, but I definitely wasn't surprised to read your post.

Please note that you may not so much need someone with a degree in Vietnamese language as you need someone who is trained to teach Vietnamese to speakers of other languages.  As you are probably aware those are not the same thing. 

Many universities in the US have changed the name of their ESL departments to SLS or Second Language Studies to match their actual curriculum and student body.   This is particularly true at the graduate level where a lot of foreign students, particularly Chinese and Japanese, are studying in the US to teach their native languages to others.  I don't recall the name but I am sure there is a university in HCMC that is for teacher training.  I would look there.

OceanBeach92107 :

I recently posted to a Facebook group that I wanted a THREE bedroom apartment, furnished, with at least two toilets.
EVERY reply I received was for a studio or 1 bedroom or 2 bedroom.
None of them even referred to my request (you know: Sorry, I don't have what you want, however..). They just started spamming me with messages about the apartments they do have.

Hm, I omitted important thing in my OP :D

2 expatriates commented by using bad words to harass me and the post!

One was an American guy who 'teach English' (Teacher-Map is his nick name) with no qualification (NATIVE SPEAKER)! He asked me that why I am here in this 'third world country' when he is already here :D
Second guy is working as some sales department from Guatemala. He teased me " do you have any degree to ask for high degree Vietnamese teacher?" and followed by so many abusive words :D

To them I was a spammer!!

Don't know why people thinks that illiterate people only come to Vietnam!
Is there any restriction for well educated people? :D :D

THIGV :

Please note that you may not so much need someone with a degree in Vietnamese language as you need someone who is trained to teach Vietnamese to speakers of other languages.  As you are probably aware those are not the same thing.

Agree but do you think people who contacted me are 'trained'?
On a second step, I asked, 'a Vietnamese teacher with English major' but that also too much?
Then I am sorry to say that I am not your type to get someone to learn. If I learn, I should have to learn from a teacher, not a $5 girl.

Then again, why majority people here interested in NATIVE ENGLISH TEACHER?
So many 'trained' English teachers are here from all over the world :D
I am not crying for 'white' skinned teacher :D
I just want a teacher who can teach me Vietnamese.
It's not free. As I posted before, 'nothing is free in this world'!
So when we pay for a product, we should have to check the quality, right?
I don't think you pay and purchase anything :D

It's very difficult to find someone who has a Vietnamese language degree nowadays.

I hate to sound like old people who always talk about the good old days, but as far as education goes, it's a sad state of affair now comparing to pre-1975 when every high school graduate had 7 hrs/wk for 7 years of first foreign language, and up to 5 hrs/wk for 3 years of second foreign language, both as mandatory courses and completely free for all students.  At the same time, Vietnamese language (as a subject) was taught in all 12 years of public school, which began with grammar and vocabulary, continued with literature and arts for the eras between 10th and 20th century, and ended with philosophy. 

To find a tutor (I'm purposely not using the term teacher) who is well-versed in Vietnamese language, you would need someone who was educated under the old regime.  Of course, all Vietnamese can speak and write in their mother tongue, but whether they understand the nuance that makes the language rich so they can teach it to foreigners is another story altogether.

Ciambella :

Of course, all Vietnamese can speak and write in their mother tongue, but whether they understand the nuance that makes the language rich so they can teach it to foreigners is another story altogether.

Charma, I don't have much to add, but practically, there are a few Vietnamese language schools in Saigon, so some Vietnamese teachers exist here. Perhaps there is a better place to advertise that will reach these real teachers?

@Ciambella
Are you saying that Universities stopped the course? :D
I can't believe that cause I just interviewed a Vietnamese language student for part-time job last week!

charmavietnam :

@Ciambella
Are you saying that Universities stopped the course? :D
I can't believe that cause I just interviewed a Vietnamese language student for part-time job last week!

No, I'm saying extensive Vietnamese language is no longer the main coursework in primary and secondary education, so the foundation has not been taught properly for many years now.   

Then for college students who wanted to pursue a degree in the language, there's no longer a university for that particular goal.  In April 1977, College of Literature (my alma mater) was dissolved.  No particular reason.  The College of Science was also gone.  No justification.

In March 1996, College of Social Science and Humanities was created where the two aforementioned colleges became one and the same, with many of the same courses being taught in dissimilar majors.  Thus, there's a very good chance that a person who holds a degree in Vietnamese language nowadays wouldn't have a substantial knowledge of the language as his degree implies.

Those who object to  :offtopic: posts can feel free to ignore this but I zeroed in on the words "completely free" in the following quote:

Ciambella :

...it's a sad state of affair now comparing to pre-1975 when every high school graduate had 7 hrs/wk for 7 years of first foreign language, and up to 5 hrs/wk for 3 years of second foreign language, both as mandatory courses and completely free for all students.

It is a real shame and, if you like even a betrayal of Socialist principles that a high school education is not absolutely free in Vietnam.  In addition to the general tuition charged for middle and high school, there are special fees for English classes when taught by native speakers.  I won't go into the details because I have given them before but the fees charged outstrip the salary paid to the foreign teacher by several multiples.  Someone is skimming the system and it should be a crime.  I believe the Vietnamese constitution says that education is to be free but that principle seemingly is only applied in K-5.  So much for "to each according to his needs."  Poor children need instruction every bit as much as the scion of the middle and new upper classes.

Then we should have to start a "SAVE VIETNAMESE LANGUAGE" forum :D

Am going off topic but I know personally some Vietnamese English Teachers who making 100-150 million VND ($4350 - $6500) per month by teaching English part-time :D
Can a NATIVE ENGLISH TEACHER get from any school/university more than that?

I am not jealous  at all :D
I don't want to pay money to psychiatrist :D

Ah, one of them is a member in this forum :D

charmavietnam :

Can a NATIVE ENGLISH TEACHER get from any school/university more than that?

Probably not, because the native speaker does not control a critical factor which is student grades.  I expect that the parents of those teachers' evening students have an implicit guarantee of good grades.  Another thing is that I expect that most western teachers, if taking on evening tutoring, may have a feeling for keeping numbers low enough to do a good job.  The Vietnamese English teacher in the lane where I first lived packed every seat he could.

The "World Language" is well under way.

     Keep your options open     :idontagree:

charmavietnam :

Recently I posted an ad in FB to ask for a Vietnamese Language Teacher ...

wrong place sorry :P

When my wife told me that even in poor neighborhoods, teachers expect to receive "presents" and parties for "teacher's day", I realized kids from kindergarten age begin resenting those with "power". Strange way to build a happy society.

To any Vietnamese in the forum, in the US and probably most democracies, giving favors to a teacher or boss is called a "conflict of interest" and is illegal, and causes perpetrators to lose jobs, lose face and sometimes go to jail. My wife thought giving presents to teachers was normal everywhere, didn't realize the inherent corruption.

Sorry if I went  :offtopic: .

interesting...
we don't do that in germany either, and you are also not supposed to have any further relationship with students after school or be friends with them (or any other relationships) - which counts definitely as a conflict of interests...

but maybe, if you consider how much vietnamese teachers (not foreigners) usually get paid (i guess often not that much) a little present might be nice once a year.

the idea of giving presents is also maybe a mild bribe, to make sure the kid doesn't fail the test? :P

maybe you can ask your wife why she thinks they are supposed to give presents to teachers?

There wasn't a Teachers' Day pre-1975.  The tradition of paying respect and offering tokens of appreciation to teachers only happened on the 3rd day of Tet.  Everyone who had ever been a student on this day came to give bow to the teachers, to thank them for their role in shaping his characters and intellect.  The gifts were given to ALL teachers who had ever had a positive impact on the students' lives.  Every Tet, our living room was overflowed with gifts from my father's generations of students who continued to show their respect year after year, even when they were in their 40s and 50s, decades after they had left school.

Not until 1982 when the new government adopted World Teachers' Day.  Not all countries in the world belonged to FISE (Federation Internationale Syndicale de L'Enseignement, or World Federation of Teacher Unions).  The US is not one of the members.

World Teachers' Day is on Oct 5, but many countries changed the date to fit their purposes.  In Vietnam, it's on Nov 20.  All kinds of award ceremonies and pep talks occur on that day.  Schools are closed so teachers can have a day off to participate in the activities, while students are encouraged to give flowers to their teachers to show their gratitude.  From flowers to other gifts was but a tiny step, especially when the teachers are the persons who give fee-based tutoring sessions to students who need or want the extra boost.

Of course without any sense of bribery, it is a very nice custom to honor one's teachers. My wife had one special high school teacher who was very supportive of her. He knew she was poor and couldn't afford tutors so he helped her after hours, and encouraged her to go to college. Which she did and excelled at. I suggested she try to find him twenty years later, she knew where his house was, but it had changed. Finally I told her to just ask at the local businesses, and success, she found out that he retired and moved to the SFBay area. We are going there in a couple weeks, her first trip to the US, and they will have a reunion. It will be touching. :par:

gobot :

... he retired and moved to the SFBay area. We are going there in a couple weeks, her first trip to the US, and they will have a reunion. It will be touching  :par:

You'll see your hometown (or your last hometown) through her eyes, that's a new experience for you too.

Losing touch with the Vietnamese language is an issue and it's compounded by the fact that the current generation in general does not know how to or bother to communicate. 

At work, I have to force people into 1-on-1 meetings and two minutes after person A said something person B couldn't even tell me what was said.  Heck, half the time person A couldn't tell me what he said.

Additionally, and unfortunately, it's become a worldwide phenomenon where we neither pay, respect, or empower teachers enough to do their jobs.  We use "don't who can't, teach" as an insult but these hands are the hands we put the future of our children into.

Fees for tutoring is definitely a VN thing, but teachers in the US have their ways too like requiring you to purchase their notes from the bookstore.

@OP
It's a society-turned-culture thing.  It's 80% not giving a dam and 20% reading comprehension.  These people figure they have nothing to lose so no harm in contacting you even if they don't fit the bill.

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