How hard for Vietnamese Woman to get a tourist visa to USA

just wondering what is considered the requirements for a woman to get a tourist visa to the USA.
I imagine there is word on the street such as
Minimum savings
Job stability
Perhaps land or house ownership
Past travel history
Age
Children or not

Best source of information on this: The US Embassy in Hanoi or the US Consulate in HCMC.

I can read the website surely.  But USA doesn't publish the real requirements.  And no denial letters do no one knows for sure.   But what is the common believed requirements based on those who have been denied and given tourist visas

Don't know about the "common believed requirements", but one of my nieces had been going back and forth to the States and Europe for many years with renewed multiple entry visas.  Her situation: owned a small property, had an employment verification letter from a foreign-owned medical business in Saigon, in her '50s, two of her 3 children living in the States.

Last year, her visa applications to both US and Schengen states were denied.  Same asset, same job, same family situation, one year older in age, few more stamps in her passport. 

At the same time last year, her brother (a retiree) and sis-in-law (a homemaker) received a 90-day Schengen visa and a 10-year multiple entry to Canada.  They took a 6-week trip to Europe, came back, went to Canada for another 6 weeks, came back. 

They're currently waiting for multiple entry visa to the States as first time applicants.  Their situation:  frequent travellers in Asia, only child attending uni in Canada, own home, a successful investment property, highly substantial income and assets in Vietnam (even when compared to Western standards.)

That is interesting that she was denied after having a USA Visa.  Maybe tRump?   Maybe harder this last year?   I do know I'm Thailand the word is a good job like teacher or retired nurse.  Job letter with vacation approval, salary or pension amount.  A house, debt is ok.  Maybe at least 5000$ USD in bank  which makes sense.  I also suspect if woman is to beautiful it's not easy yo get ok at interview because they may find a man or become a sex worker.

G’day Elkski,

It’s very simple.  It’s all about human nature & percieved intentions.
Your suspicions may be correct in the last sentence of your post #5.

If she’s young and beautiful, a donut eating female US immigration official out of pure jealousy & b*******s will probably tick the NO box.

A male immigration official will be thinking with his small brain and assume all sorts of potential “hazards”.😆 and to be on the safe side will also tick the NO box.

Yogi would like to suggest that you get your lady friend along to KFC and also get some of those Lotte Mart donuts into her as quick as you can.   Also ,,no make up and wear an old track suit to the Visa interview...if you get one.

This course of action is certainly out of “left field” , but it’s probably your best chance along with the other personal employment,  family & financial assets based in Vietnam.

It should work....Yogi has always noticed how those big fat shielas always get to the front of the line at the bank & post office.  Immigration shouldn’t be any different.

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elkski :

That is interesting that she was denied after having a USA Visa.  Maybe tRump?   Maybe harder this last year?

I don't think she was denied due to the US new policy, because the EU also rejected her visa (it would've been her 3rd or 4th with them.)

Her siblings agreed that the reason must have been her too frequent visits (3X/yr to the States and once every other year to Europe).  People who have a serious job cannot taking off for long trips that often without worrying about the paycheck, so the authority probably suspected that she had a business overseas.

elkski :

just wondering what is considered the requirements for a woman to get a tourist visa to the USA.
I imagine there is word on the street such as
Minimum savings
Job stability
Perhaps land or house ownership
Past travel history
Age
Children or not

To be completely honest, save the $165 fee.  We tried in September, had all of the right documents, owned house, had daughter staying here, stable job, adequate savings, still denied.

SteinNebraska :

To be completely honest, save the $165 fee.  We tried in September, had all of the right documents, owned house, had daughter staying here, stable job, adequate savings, still denied.

I'm confused.  Aren't you US citizen?

SteinNebraska :

To be completely honest, save the $165 fee.  We tried in September, had all of the right documents, owned house, had daughter staying here, stable job, adequate savings, still denied.

The same happen to us before we got married.  Her family wanted her to visit the USA before we got married to know my family and life in America.  We thought it would not be a problem since she had property and a professional job in VN with a large multinational company based in Europe.  We had traveled in Asia as well.  I provided all the personal and professional information about me, my job, income, properties in the USA and net worth. 

When she went to the interview, it lasted no more than 5 minutes.  All the interviewer asked were basic questions, where she lives, where she works, how long, how much she made, how she met me, how long we know each other and why go to the states.  She offered my legal documents, along with a penalty of perjury statement, information on other persons I have sponsored to the USA (not from VN but other countries where applicants get denied just like VN) and proof that all had traveled to the USA and returned home.  The interviewer refused to even look at the documents and rejected her in 5 minutes.

Based on her experience, my opinion is that the interviewer had already determined that she was going to get rejected before the interview and just went through the motions to ask the basic questions.  Why would he refuse to look at supporting legal documentation? 

However, when we got engaged, the K-1 visa was no problem and actually the opposite happened.  The interview last 5 minutes and she was granted the visa.    I think the big difference, in our case, is that when you apply for a tourist visa, the applicant is the VN citizen and if they are rejected, they have -0- appeal rights.  However, a K-1 visa or spousal visa, the US citizen is the petitioner and if rejected, you have appeal rights.  I made it very difficult for the embassy to say no on the K-1. 

It is not just VN, but many countries have the same problem, tourist visas are rejected overwhelmingly and it is a cash cow for the USA.  For example, I had a foreign family member who had applied for a tourist visa and despite the fact that all of his siblings and both parents had multiple entry visas to the USA and had made multiple trips back and forth, he was rejected many times.  Finally, I made a trip to the embassy with him and gave him a legal opinion as to why he should be granted a visa, including all the information on the visas his family has with the USA.   When he came out, he said he got the visa, but only because of me being physically there and my legal opinion.  He said the interviewer had rejected him and denied the visa, but before he left, he said please read this.  The interviewer asked if I was there at the embassy and he said yes, would you like to speak with him.  The interviewer said no and left the room pist off.  Reason being is that I threatened to bring legal action against the embassy if he was denied without cause.  So the interviewer checked all the visas of his family had from the USA, came back and said "you have a nice family, I am giving you a 1 entry visa."

Sorry for the long story, but based on my experiences, getting a tourist visa from a 3rd world country for the USA is difficult.  You have no appeal rights and it is a cash cow for the USA.  Of course there are people who get them, but not many.  There are no guarantees, but you should make it difficult for the USA to say no by having many factors in your favor and knowing the right people can help.

Ciambella :
SteinNebraska :

To be completely honest, save the $165 fee.  We tried in September, had all of the right documents, owned house, had daughter staying here, stable job, adequate savings, still denied.

I'm confused.  Aren't you US citizen?

Sorry that was unclear, I am a US citizen, we tried to get a tourist visa for my fiance to visit and was declined, so I just moved to HCMC this week.  I'll  be here at least two years until her marriage visa is approved.

SteinNebraska :
Ciambella :
SteinNebraska :

To be completely honest, save the $165 fee.  We tried in September, had all of the right documents, owned house, had daughter staying here, stable job, adequate savings, still denied.

I'm confused.  Aren't you US citizen?

Sorry that was unclear, I am a US citizen, we tried to get a tourist visa for my fiance to visit and was declined, so I just moved to HCMC this week.  I'll  be here at least two years until her marriage visa is approved.

So a marriage visa takes 2 years?

Did she apply for a tourist visa  on her own or as you as a sponsor?

The word on the street in Thailand is that is is best for a woman to say she knows no man in USA and to apply like she is a tourist.  There is a box on the visa application where you can add a sponsor but then your chances go down...
From what I read about the K1 visa they expect you to basically have wedding plans and reservations and a date all set?  This seems crazy to think a couple can commit to marry before the woman can even visit the mans home, family or country.    I guess I am not ready to commit and go big at this time like a K1 visa application. .Not ready at all.  I thought if a woman can get a 6 months visa then we could spend some time in both countries for a couple years before committing to marriage.  I'm not a marriage fan.

elkski :
SteinNebraska :
Ciambella :


I'm confused.  Aren't you US citizen?

Sorry that was unclear, I am a US citizen, we tried to get a tourist visa for my fiance to visit and was declined, so I just moved to HCMC this week.  I'll  be here at least two years until her marriage visa is approved.

So a marriage visa takes 2 years?

Did she apply for a tourist visa  on her own or as you as a sponsor?

The word on the street in Thailand is that is is best for a woman to say she knows no man in USA and to apply like she is a tourist.  There is a box on the visa application where you can add a sponsor but then your chances go down...
From what I read about the K1 visa they expect you to basically have wedding plans and reservations and a date all set?  This seems crazy to think a couple can commit to marry before the woman can even visit the mans home, family or country.    I guess I am not ready to commit and go big at this time like a K1 visa application. .Not ready at all.  I thought if a woman can get a 6 months visa then we could spend some time in both countries for a couple years before committing to marriage.  I'm not a marriage fan.

Just a few comments:

1. Not sure how long a marriage visa takes, but I applied for the K-1 and it took 6 months from the date of filing to the day she got the visa.
2. Based on my experiences, a single woman applying for a tourist visa without substantial ties and assets to VN is going to get rejected.  I even know college students, whose parents are wealthy, who get rejected because many of them go to the US to study and disappear.  Without a sponsor, that single woman is at high risk of getting rejected.
3. Don't think the marriage or K-1 visas are easy, many get rejected everyday and I watched a lot of women leave crying.
4. I even heard one of the consulants at the embasy tell an applicant, "i am well trained to ensure there is a legitimate relationship, it is my job."

Marriage visa CR1 takes about 14 months.  The main difference is you are already married so they spend the time determining if the marriage is legitimate.  The difference upon arrival in the US is the K1 fiancé visa gives the couple 90 days to get married.  Once done the spouse is given a conditional green card - 2 or 3 years, I don’t recall.  During that time they will make unscheduled visits to see you to determine if you are legitimately married.  The CR1 marriage visa upon approval gives the spouse a permanent 10 year green card and a social security number within 2 weeks so they are a bit more thorough.

Just a minor point but the 10 year green card on arrival is only for spouses who have been married more than 2 years.  If you have been married for less, the spouse will have a temporary card on arrival.  Since the application process seems to take more than a year, this generally won't happen unless the sponsor makes the original application immediately after the marriage happens.   If the spouse arrives in the US  before the 2 year point, there is a Form I-751 to apply to remove the temporary status and a $595 filing fee that must be submitted just before the 2 year date.

With respect to the interview for a marriage visa, despite extensive documentary evidence of over two years of marriage and cohabitation while in Vietnam, my wife was asked a question that I felt was inappropriate.  She was asked the names of my adult children, which I had not discussed with her more than once or twice as they live in different states than we were moving to.  I also went back and looked and their names were not listed anywhere on the application materials.  Either the questioner did not even really know their names and was just bluffing or USCIS had done some kind of background check on me.  Fortunately, my wife had learned of this question through a local grapevine and was prepared.   I expect that the list of questions used by interviewers is repeated throughout the day but probably does change over time.

Good catch on the two year marriage limitation before the interview.  I forgot about that one.

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