Retiree wanting to Live in Belgium & Travel Europe

Hi,
I read most of the visa posts and none seem to address a retired person. Are there any expats on this forum who are retired in Belgium and have a long-stay non-work type visa. I am a US citizen and can come in for 90 days visa-free, but want to rent longer-term and stay for 1 to 2 years to travel in Europe.

I am currently staying in Bangkok and traveling SE Asia with my next stop wanting to be Europe. I have a good company pension, retirement income and Aetna medical coverage, so I should qualify for some type of long-stay non-work visa. Based on my age 61 and my income, it was very easy to get a (retirement) visa in Thailand. I'm hoping it would be the same in Belgium. I would like to stay in Brussels.

Any specifics on what type of visa, how to apply and what docs are needed would be appreciated. If any expats are living in Belgium and leaving every 90 days to renew their visa, please share the rules for doing this, if have to leave the Schengen area or just Belgium and how many times can do this?
Thanks kindly...

Hi,

Few people see Belgium as a place to retire. As a result, there is no visa adapted to this type of request.

In reality, for the Belgian administration, the bottom line is that you do not cost anything to the country. So if you can prove a serious monthly income as well as full medical coverage, you should obtain the visa on the basis of exceptional circumstances.

Here are a list of usually asked documents:
- A certified birth certificate (ie with an apostille) and a translation for each member of your family
- Copies of marriage certificates (with apostille) or divorce with translations, if applicable
- A medical certificate issued by a licensed physician (the consulate or embassy will give you a list)
- The completed application form (s); (https://dofi.ibz.be/sites/dvzoe/index.html)(https://dofi.ibz.be/sites/dvzoe/FR/Guid … gique.aspx)
- Passport-type photos (one to six or more, depending on the circumstances);
- A work permit (if you intend to work) or proof that your employer has applied for a work permit for you;
- proof of authorization to practice your profession in the country (if you are self-employed, journalist or another regulated profession) or a professional card, which serves as a work permit for certain independent professions;
- a police report (sometimes called a "certificate of good conduct");
- proof of your financial resources (if you do not intend to work);
- proof that you have health insurance;

phipiemar :

Hi,

Few people see Belgium as a place to retire. As a result, there is no visa adapted to this type of request.

In reality, for the Belgian administration, the bottom line is that you do not cost anything to the country. So if you can prove a serious monthly income as well as full medical coverage, you should obtain the visa on the basis of exceptional circumstances.

Thanks so much... you were very kind to take the time to respond with the list of docs. My choice of Belgium is because I worked for Dow Chemical for 40 years and Dow has a plant in Terneuzen and I know some Belgian and Dutch employees who work there. So, I thought Brussels would be a great place to visit and use as base to travel in Europe.

Thanks again, Kindly...

New topic