Registration for non-residents a.k.a temporary BSN

HI Everyone,

If I want to apply for the BSN- non resident (less than 4 months) then all I will need is my address back home and that's it? Do i need to bring some kind of payslips or a bill with my name of it ?

Thanks!

Hi and welcome to the Forum.

There is no requirement in the Netherlands for non-residents to register; so they do not get a BSN.

Hope this helps.

Cynic
Expat Team

Hello

I've read through this forum and everyone seems very knowledgeable so ...
Background:
I'm coming to the Netherlands in September to work however, I don't have a permanent address so I am staying at a friends place for the first month.

My company requires me to get a BSN number so I get begin work.
My question:
Can I register as a non-resident(less than 4 months) and get my BSN number and then in like 2 months time, once I've moved into my own place, change the details to staying for longer than 4 months. I do plan on living in the Netherlands permanently. Is this transition possible?
From what I can read the RNI number doesn't require a permanent address because I will be registering as a non-resident for a stay under 4 months but once I do have a permanent address, I can register that I'm staying for longer.

Thank you!

xander0728 :

Hello

I've read through this forum and everyone seems very knowledgeable so ...
Background:
I'm coming to the Netherlands in September to work however, I don't have a permanent address so I am staying at a friends place for the first month.

My company requires me to get a BSN number so I get begin work.
My question:
Can I register as a non-resident(less than 4 months) and get my BSN number and then in like 2 months time, once I've moved into my own place, change the details to staying for longer than 4 months. I do plan on living in the Netherlands permanently. Is this transition possible?
From what I can read the RNI number doesn't require a permanent address because I will be registering as a non-resident for a stay under 4 months but once I do have a permanent address, I can register that I'm staying for longer.

Thank you!

Hi and welcome to the Forum.

To answer your question; no, you can't register as non-resident; the whole point of registering is to declare your residency, it makes no sense to do what you are suggesting.  You can register from any address where  the landlord/owner permits it.

Hope this helps.

Cynic
Expat Team

Hello Cynic

Thanks for your reply.

When I meant non-resident, I meant as a person working & staying for less than 4 months.
Can you change your status from staying for less than 4 months to staying longer than 4 months?

Thanks

xander0728 :

Hello Cynic

Thanks for your reply.

When I meant non-resident, I meant as a person working & staying for less than 4 months.
Can you change your status from staying for less than 4 months to staying longer than 4 months?

Thanks

LOL hi again.

I'm beginning to wish that people hadn't ever mentioned the short-term BSN; these are only for people who are coming to work in the Netherlands for a short time, typically cross-border workers from Belgium and Germany, they have no intention of staying in the Netherlands, but need it for things like opening a bank account, or registering with a doctor.  That is not you.

There is no difference in the services you can access, there is absolutely no advantage or point in asking for a short-term BSN.

Hope this helps.

Cynic
Expat Team

haha thanks for clarifying it for me.

I appreciate your help and patience :)

My question is.. I'm going over to live in the Netherlands. But I'm gonna be staying with a family I know from my hometown.. And unfortunately I can't use their address to register for a BSN number. And I know I won't be able to find permanent accommodation within 5 days. So I have also been advised to register for a temporary BSN by many people,and then once I get a permanent accommodation,then I go and register permanently.. But from what you say I can't do that and why not.. Cause then otherwise I won't be able to register

Hi and welcome to the Forum.

You are in a quandary.

First, off, as you've read, temporary BSN is exactly the same as the normal type; if you can't register from your family friends address for a permanent BSN, then neither can you for the temporary version - they have exactly the same requirements.  The only difference between the 2 is that one is for people who have come to live in the Netherlands, the other is for temporary workers.  Some Gemeente's don't even offer temporary BSN as an option; it's mainly in places where they have a lot of temporary workers.

The 5 days rule is to make an appointment for registration, these normally take another 2 weeks till you actually have to be there with all your documents.

Hope this helps.

Cynic
Expat Team

It’s good that the question was asked, because the whole BSN process can be quite confusing depending on your circumstances and prior understanding. It may make perfect sense with hindsight, but this is not always the case for those of us still to have the experience of getting one.

My understanding is that in practice, there is in fact ZERO difference at all in the actual process of getting a BSN normally vs through the RNI route. The only difference I see is that the RNI path simply recognises you are not a permanent resident whereas the standard path recognises that you are. But a BSN is still a BSN and both pathways to getting one require that you turn up in person at your designated Gemeente with the (same) required paperwork.

But, if you get a BSN through RNI, you will still need to register as a permanent resident with your local gemeente regardless. As a temporary resident there may be some things not available to you as a permanent resident, so the need to essentially re-register when your status changes is potentially a headache that could be avoided by simply registering as a permanent resident in the first place, since there is otherwise no procedural difference. The only reason to not register fully is if you’re not eligible, or if you’re definitely not intending to stay longer than the four months intended under the RNI scheme.

Is this a reasonable interpretation, Cynic?

For myself, I’m in the position where I am a Dutch citizen but have not previously resided in the Netherlands. My mother was Dutch, and I gained by citizenship by application while still in Australia. I’m now in the UK, looking to move across the Channel some time next year, and have been agonising over the BSN process for some time now! I have found the contributions on both sides of this discussion to be helpful and valuable, but I do think Cynic seems to have the more accurate understanding of it overall. The problem seems to me to arise from the idea that the RNI process is more helpful if you’re non-resident, but since you can’t actually *apply* from overseas, it is in fact no different in terms of ease/difficulty - hence, apply for the process that is actually relevant to you and your intended length of stay.

When I come over it will be with the intent of starting a business, so I won’t have an employer. I likely won’t even have a permanent address for some time, as I’ll be looking for the cheapest single accommodation initially while searching long-term for something family-friendly for when things are right to bring them across from the UK. In that context, I’ll be setting up a B.V. for the business as that will not only save hassles long-term but ensure banking facilities can also be setup without delays that would affect when I can start trading. That can all be done through my lawyers before I even arrive. BUT...once I do arrive, I will immediately apply for my BSN as noted by Cynic and get the personal side of things sorted too. It doesn’t actually sound as daunting as it did before, that’s for sure!

In terms of needing a BSN for gaining a job, I don’t think it is anything like the barrier people may assume. There’s nothing stopping you from applying for jobs without a BSN, you’ll just need to have one so that you can be paid and to pay the right tax etc, but even with a delay of a couple of weeks between applying for and receiving your BSN, that is easily how long you could expect to wait between application and start for even the most streamlined and successful of job-hunting processes! The UK equivalent of a BSN is the NIN, and I didn’t receive mine until I’d already been working here for nearly two months (having been given the job several months earlier while still in Australia). It was required to have a NIN to ensure I was taxed appropriately, but not having one was no barrier to either finding or commencing employment even so. If the bureaucratically-inept UK can manage something like that so easily, I can’t see the considerably more efficient Netherlands being so cumbersome as to prevent it altogether! Besides, as I’m sure other expats who’ve already made a move will attest, you really should be looking at a good couple of weeks minimum as a transition time between arrival in-country and starting work anyway - there are so many things to do on arrival in a new country that launching straight into work can be harder and more stressful and not always very helpful. Budget accordingly, and you’ll be fine.

I agree with your summation in the most part.  My interpretation of it all is that the bottom line is that the BSN system is a state requirement for all residents to register their residence in the Netherlands; the UK does not currently have such a system - although Brexit may change this).  There are 2 distinct BSN databases, one permanent, the other temporary, the latter being for people who are not resident in the Netherlands (i.e. cross-border workers).

Your reference to the UK NIN is understandable, like the current social tax system in the Netherlands, the UK National Insurance system was initially a contributory form of insurance against illness and unemployment, and to provide retirement pensions and other social benefits; over time, those links have become indistinct, with politicians not liking these links as it restricted what they could use the money for and is now regarded as an additional source of general taxation which can be (and is) used to fine-tune the overall system.  There are some significant differences, but we are now getting into tax, so I shall stop here.

Not having a BSN card does not stop anyone getting work; when you register, you are handed a piece of paper with the number on it, once you have the number you can work, but you absolutely must have the number.  As a Dutch passport holder, you already have a BSN number, for Dutch passports issued as of 2014 the BSN is on the back of the hard page (the holder page). On older passports, it appears on the front of this page (link).  All that you are doing when you register at the Gemeente is telling them where you live, you are already on the National Database as an overseas Dutch citizen.

If you intend to start a business in NL, then you need to be talking to the Kamer van Koophandel (link); it's in Dutch, but if you click the contact link, you will get their phone number, they speak English.

Hope this helps.

Cynic
Expat Team

Cynic :

As a Dutch passport holder, you already have a BSN number, for Dutch passports issued as of 2014 the BSN is on the back of the hard page (the holder page). On older passports, it appears on the front of this page (link).  All that you are doing when you register at the Gemeente is telling them where you live, you are already on the National Database as an overseas Dutch citizen.

Pretty sure I don’t have a BSN at all - I couldn’t find anything recognisable as a BSN last time I checked. My passport is currently with UKVI (my wife’s UK residency is being processed at the moment), so I can’t confirm. If you’re born in the Netherlands, or have previously resided there, then yes you will have a BSN in the system somewhere. But as I understand it you need to have at least lived there at some point in order to have a BSN, and there are some circumstances in which a person can be a Dutch citizen without having lived in the Netherlands.

There does appear to be a mechanism for applying for a BSN as a non-resident citizen (mainly intended for people who are living elsewhere but receive a Dutch pension, for example), but this is a different scenario to the one that is the focus of this discussion. Maybe still of relevance to some, perhaps?

For anyone wondering how you can be a citizen without ever having been a resident...

https://ind.nl/en/dutch-citizenship/pag … ement.aspx

Dutch citizenship laws are quite complex and confusing, but that’s a fairly clear summary of the key points.

I'm not 100% certain (mainly because I've never been in your situation); I'd be interested in knowing when you get yours back.

Hello.

I went through the replies but I didn't find a situation similar to mine so I'd like to address my concern in case you can help me out.

I'm moving to Amsterdam next week as I got a job offer from a firm (starting next week too).

I have already found accommodation but my rental contract starts on 1st of November (a friend will host me for the first month).

Will I be able to get my BSN if I present my house contract that has a starting date from 1st of November?

Thanks a lot in advance!

Hi and welcome to the Forum

You have 5 days from arrival to contact the Genentech and make an appointment to register, you register at the address you’re staying at. When you move you notify the Genentech of the change.

Thank you for having me!

Ok, but on the address that I'll be staying is a friends place who will host me for October and (obviously) he can not register me or something. 

Can I give his address nonetheless and update to my apartment's address from 1st of November?

Assuming its allowed from your friends address, then you register there, then notify your new address when you move.

Cynic :

Assuming its allowed from your friends address, then you register there, then notify your new address when you move.

Just got off the phone with local gementee.

Apparently, the closest date for an appointment was at the end of October so the employer suggested me to set the appointment for 1st of November (contract's start date) so I would be sure that I would get the BSN number straight away.

What stresses me out now though, is that I'll start working on 4/10. Is that legal? Will my company accept it?

Hi All,

Very informative thread, thank you.

I'm moving to Amsterdam later this month from the UK. Brexit or no Brexit I am done with the UK.

BSNs are for life as I understand it. I went to university in Amsterdam for a year (study discontinued) 6 years ago and still have my BSN documentation for it (university address registered). Would I be able to operate under this number? My memory isn't clear on if I deregistered or not, but knowing my level of idiocy back then I probably didn't. To be clear I have never worked in the Netherlands and have not been back long term since university.

Any insights, comments or advice on this matter would be most helpful.

Hi and welcome to the Forum

You are correct that your BSN is for life.  However, if you go today, you can just find somewhere to live, then go to the Gemeentehuis and register with that number; after Brexit,you may have to go through MVV (which is a joint residence and work permit), plus take the Dutch language exam - we don't know yet.

Hope this helps.

Cynic
Expat Team

Hi Cynic,

That is incredibly useful information, thank you.

I wanted to query what I am reading on the City of Amsterdams website with regards to registration. It speaks of many options one which seems to hint at not having a permanent address and simply registering a postal address. It states the following:

''If you do not have a home address, for a postal address (briefadres): an Address registration permission form (in Dutch) signed by the main occupant and a copy of his or her proof of identity, such as a passport or an ID card. A postal address enables you to temporarily receive post at the address of someone you know.''

Please, can you explain the implications here? Am I able to register a postal address temporarily while I secure a permanent address?

Really appreciate your insights on this process!

Hi again.

We’ve heard of people registering from hotel addresses.

Hello everyone,

I am currently living abroad but I will be moving to the Netherlands early 2020 to start a new permanent job.
I already worked in the Netherlands befre (it was only a short stay), so I already have my BSN number which is great.

However, I will have a problem with address registration: my current financial situation forces me to take an inexpensive airbnb during the first few weeks of my stay and the host already told me he doesn't want me to register at his address. Unfortunately, even the cheapest hotel is out of my current financial reach.
The lack of an address also translates to a problem of buying health insurance, which is obviously required to start the job.

I am trying to find other solutions that might help me in this situation, so any advice is most welcome.

Thanks in advance!

OneManZerg :

Hello everyone,

I am currently living abroad but I will be moving to the Netherlands early 2020 to start a new permanent job.
I already worked in the Netherlands befre (it was only a short stay), so I already have my BSN number which is great.

However, I will have a problem with address registration: my current financial situation forces me to take an inexpensive airbnb during the first few weeks of my stay and the host already told me he doesn't want me to register at his address. Unfortunately, even the cheapest hotel is out of my current financial reach.
The lack of an address also translates to a problem of buying health insurance, which is obviously required to start the job.

I am trying to find other solutions that might help me in this situation, so any advice is most welcome.

Thanks in advance!

Hi and welcome to the Forum.

Bottom line is you need to find somewhere else to live that will permit registration.  You will not be able to start working without a valid BSN; the BSN you have will no longer be valid until you re-register; if you try and use it with your new employer, it will highlight to the authorities straight away and they will contact your boss to start an investigation.

Hope this has helped you stay out of trouble (if nothing else).

Cynic
Expat Team

Hey I have issues with my bsn
First when I came I rent the room and the I made a appointment for bsn but after I got my bsn it’s say this is not residents then I made another appointment I registered my self in city hall again
My question is
Is it possible to Make  that bsn from temporary to permanent because I register for permanent
What will happen to my bsn is it gonna be temporary after registration or is it gonna permanent please let me know
And they said they will send me the confirmation latter within 5 working days
Regard

Khan1220s :

Hey I have issues with my bsn
First when I came I rent the room and the I made a appointment for bsn but after I got my bsn it’s say this is not residents then I made another appointment I registered my self in city hall again
My question is
Is it possible to Make  that bsn from temporary to permanent because I register for permanent
What will happen to my bsn is it gonna be temporary after registration or is it gonna permanent please let me know
And they said they will send me the confirmation latter within 5 working days
Regard

Hi and welcome to the Forum.

There is no difference between a temporary BSN and a permanent one; they are the same thing with the same requirements and the same benefits.  The only difference is they are 2 different databases, the temporary one is for people who come to the Netherlands for 4 months or less and need to open a bank account or register with a doctor; i.e. seasonal or cross-border workers from countries adjacent to the Netherlands.  The other permanent one is for everybody else - such as Afghan citizens who have entered the Netherlands legally and are looking for work.  Not all Gemeente offer the temporary database.

If your accommodation does not permit registration, then you will have to find somewhere else to live that does.

If you are in the Netherlands as an Asylum seeker, then I recommend that you go back to your caseworker and seek advice from them.

Hope this helps.

Cynic
Expat Team

Please clarify my question

My question is I got my bsn which is for  less than 4 months then I decide to stay long then I booked the appointment for first registration database
I give all my detail all requirements to the city hall
What will happen to my statuse will it change to permanent or no and I am a British citizen
After the appointment they said they send me the confirmation latter
Thanks

Shareef khan suliman :

Please clarify my question

My question is I got my bsn which is for  less than 4 months then I decide to stay long then I booked the appointment for first registration database
I give all my detail all requirements to the city hall
What will happen to my statuse will it change to permanent or no and I am a British citizen
After the appointment they said they send me the confirmation latter
Thanks

Hi again.

You are a UK citizen, so currently have the right to live and work anywhere in the EU; this will change when Brexit is implemented, how it will change for you will depend on your circumstances.

Gemeente registration where you get you BSN and DigiD is nothing to do with Immigration, it is a national requirement for everybody who is resident in the Netherlands, where you come from or when you came, it makes no difference at all - you have to do it.  You were placed on the Short-term register because you must have told them that you were staying for 4-months or less, that is the only reason that people get placed on that section of the database.  The confirmation letter you will receive will confirm your BSN number and provide you with details of obtaining your DigiD.

With regards to residence; this link will take you to the Dutch Government website that describes ALL of the conditions for definite residence in the Netherlands for UK passport holders after Brexit.  If you meet the requirements described, you will be granted residence in the Netherlands.

I've removed your double post.

Hope this helps.

Cynic
Expat Team

Sorry I didn’t get it they said they will send me confirmation latter within 5 days I don’t understand why they want to send me the confirmation latter please let me know

Shareef khan suliman :

Sorry I didn’t get it they said they will send me confirmation latter within 5 days I don’t understand why they want to send me the confirmation latter please let me know

The confirmation letter normally confirms your address and BSN number and gives you details of how to register and log in to your DigiD account; DigiD is how you can deal with a whole lot of stuff online.

Ok thanks
But it’s already take 5 days still haven’t receive anything

Shareef khan suliman :

Ok thanks
But it’s already take 5 days still haven’t receive anything

Hi again.

Post-NL is renowned for its inefficiency; they send the mail for sorting to the cheapest place they can find.  I'm still waiting for a letter that was posted in Enschede on 23 December last year.  I would give it a week, then chase them.

Hope this helps.

Cynic
Expat Team

I received the latter it’s show my bsn and my detail everything so is it possible now to open a bank account now

Shareef khan suliman :

I received the latter it’s show my bsn and my detail everything so is it possible now to open a bank account now

Hi again.

Yes it is, you'll need to take that and your passport to the bank.

Thank you so much for ur help

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