Freelancer Visa Belgium

Hi
I am a Canadian citizen.  I would like to be able to live in Belgium.  I have noticed that Germany has a freelancer visa that lasts for one year.  I am a writer and have clients in Canada.  I can work remotely without a problem.  Does anyone know if Belgium has a freelancer visa, and if so, what are the steps in obtaining it?
Thanks in advance for any help!

Hi,

This type of visa does not exist. However, you can apply for a long stay visa. What really matters to the Belgian administration when issuing a visa is to be certain that you do not intend to take advantage of social benefits. Therefore, mount a serious "financial" file.

http://canada.diplomatie.belgium.be/en/ … lgium/visa

Visa for a long stay (residence): If you are planning to stay in Belgium for a period longer than 90 days you will need to ask the consulate or the Federal Foreign Office, you need a visa for A long stay or not. You must apply at the consulate or embassy in your country of residence and obtain this visa before your departure. No visa can be obtained or changed once in Belgium.

To apply for a long-stay visa, you must have a valid visa for at least 12 months and the following documents:

A certified birth certificate (that is, with an apostille) and a translation for each member of your family
Copies of marriage certificates (with an apostille) or divorce with translations, if applicable
A medical certificate from a licensed physician (the consulate or the embassy will give you a list)
The completed application form (s);
Passport photos (one to six or more, depending on circumstances);
A work permit (if you intend to work) or proof that your employer has applied for a work permit for you;
Proof of authorization to practice your trade in the country (if you are a self-employed person, a journalist or another regulated profession) or a professional card, which serves as a work permit for certain independent trades;
A police report (sometimes called a "certificate of good conduct");
Proof of your financial resources (if you do not intend to work);
Proof that you have health insurance;
If you are a student, proof of admission to an accredited educational institution;
If you are an au pair, a copy of your contract with a host family.
If you need to have a visa to enter the country do not attempt to do so without, entry will be denied. Note that Belgium generally requires that you have a work permit or proof that your employer has requested one for you even before you have applied for a long-stay visa or residence permit.

There are several types of long stay visas, depending on whether you are going to Belgium for a job, to retire or join your spouse or other family members. It is possible to obtain a long-stay visa if you are going to Belgium to marry or have a stable relationship with a Belgian national or a person already legally resident in Belgium but there are other documents that you will have to enclose with your application Visa, including proof that the person already in Belgium is able to support a spouse or a foreign partner.

If you are going to Belgium for work and are not an EU national, your future employer must first apply for a work permit, then you can apply for a residence visa. The Belgian Embassy reports that the process of obtaining a visa can take up to a year, so do not buy your tickets until the Visa is approved.

You may be required to present certain certified and translated documents (birth certificate, marriage certificate, etc.). For more information on the documents you will need to apply for a long-stay visa, visit the Federal foreign Affairs.

EU and EAA nationals are not required to apply for residence permits in Belgium.

Non-EU citizens must register with their municipality within eight days of their arrival in Belgium, even if they intend to live there temporarily. Within two weeks of moving to a permanent residence, you will need to obtain a foreign resident identity card and be officially registered with the foreign population register.
To apply for an identity card, if you are an EU citizen or not, both you and your family members over the age of 12 will have to go to the City Hall in person to register. Children under 12 years of age will only need a "name card", people older than 12 years old will get an electronic ID card.

Thanks for this!  It's not the answer I was hoping for, but it's good information. :)

A professional card is the closest equivalent to freelancer visa.

http://www.werk.be/en/information-servi … onal-cards

http://werk-economie-emploi.brussels/en … -etrangers

New topic