IMPORTANT NEW CHANGES FOR THOSE APPLYING FOR PERMANENT VISAS

Hi James. I called them but they won't answer phone calls. I will email them. They government site I went to said $2000. If they did it in reals. It would change too much but I will check with. Thanks.

Hi James I looked at the Boston consulate website and it says $2000.00 and several other sites say the same thing! Then I found the Houston consulate! It say $6000.00 reals. Ugh! I emailed them and they said $6000 reals or $2500 dollars!! I don't understand why their is s difference in cost at different consulates for the same country. So, I either buy some if my military time and add years to my retirement or stay working longer !!! Ahhhhhhhhha shit !! Just info for other people ! You can apply for your permanent visa in Brazil or in your home country. It is faster and easier then in Brazil. It usually between a month and three months. As for bringing pets it is a lot but manly stuff from your vet and getting a special airlines that ships pets on a regular bases. I hope all of this is worth it  Brazil only does this because of America is harder on visas for Brazilians. It was going to get much easier until Snowden screwed it up for everyone !!! Anyways thanks for your help. "Lucie I got some thinking to do".

Is there anyone here who applied for a permanent visa after the new changes were instated? How's it going? Any problems?

I am going to be submitting my visa application at the end of next month and would appreciate any advice.

Thank you,
Victoria

Hi Victoria,

I've heard reports from a few of our members who have applied since the new rules when into effect and they say that their applications have gone off without a hitch. We can only that will continue and that it will be the case all over the country.

Under the new system if your paperwork is all in order your permanency is granted on-the-spot and as THEY say you'll only have to wait 60 days for the Cédula de Identidade to be ready. Well the system isn't fully 60 days old yet, so it still remains to be seen if they can actually make that timeframe or not. I personally can't see how it will be possible when they were only processing about 2000 permanency claims each month and couldn't get the ID card out in 180 days. Now they've got nearly 38 thousand of them to process just in the past two months.

Cheers,
James

I see why Americans and others give up on getting a permanent visa in Brazil .After many emails to my local consulate .I received several rude emails back. Saying that the info my friend had read on the Boston consulate site was incorrect and not updated since 2011 .Who doesn't update a government site sine 2011! Wait it's Brazil ! They said that I shouldn't quote another consulate and only go by the one in Houston.Since 2002 I have been traveling to Brazil and have been treated like crap by the Houston consulate.I have always been nice and polite to them.They act like they are doing me a favor !I just wanted correct info before I spend more time and money on this. I have spent a hell of a lot of money in Brazil.As have my family,friends and clients over the years.Most have experienced problems at this consulate and they have been reported many times and nothing has ever changed.I know American government gives many people are hard time coming here but way more people are trying to come to America .Many talk crap about America but they can't wait to get here ! So, they can talk shit about how America sucks and how where they are from is sooo better! lmao   Anyway's .It seems Brazil has way too much read tape and you have to have a net retirement pay of $6000.00 reals which is like $2400.00. I don't have it right now and I don't want to work 2 more years to get it. It just seems like Brazil has a chip on it's shoulders about Americans retiring there.I may be wrong but I have been checking out many other backup countries and some I have visited .I am also looking at Columbia , Argentina,Chile,Peru,Belize, Panama,Ecuador,Costa Rica and Uruguay !!!!! I really like how easy it is to get a permanent visa in Panama.It's a quick flight to the states,they have a Carnival,two coasts,expats can own and carry a gun ,exchange rate is good.It's not Brazil but my Spanish is much better and way easier to learn again.No hurricanes .It's still not Brazil but that's the way it goes! I guess I need to do some more flying down South soon! Sorry for rambling!  I want to thanks those that helped me and those that didn't respond back !!!!!! No problem !!!!!!!!!Peace !!!!!!

Thanks for posting this!!!

I'm (sadly) one of those that's not on the list despite being over a year into this process. Emails sent to the PF are responded with the response: Prezado(a) Senhor(a),
PROCESSO APTO PARA REGISTRO. O INTERESSADO DEVERA RETORNAR A
UNIDADE DA POLICIA FEDERAL PARA REQUERER A CEDULA DE IDENTIDADE DE ESTRANGEIRO.

Part of me wants to believe that this is a sign that I can actually start the request for an ID card.... but since their online system for checking the processo is out of order, I'm inclined to believe that they just want me to waste another day in line at the delegacia. Does anyone know how to actually obtain information on the status of one's processo?

That is exactly what it means, that you have been granted permanency and that you must now return to the Federal Police with the necessary documents in order to register in the RNE (Registro Nacional de Estrangeiro) and apply for the Cédula de Identidade Estrangeiro (CIE). This should be done within 90 days of granting the permanency.

You need to schedule the visit and fill out the request form for the CIE on the Federal Police website:   www.dpf.gov.br click on Estrangeiro and then follow the steps.

Cheers,
William James Woodward, Expat-blog Experts Team

Thanks James! I'm still doubtful but you've given me esperança!

I assume that this does not apply to consular visas. I received my permanent visa (I'm married to a Brazilian) at the consulate in New York in March of this year. I registered with the federal police shortly after my arrival. I then received a protocol which I laminated and subsequently received my permanent residence card.

No, it does not apply to Consular visas although the new system may have the overall effect of speeding them up a little bit. They do come back to Brazil for final decision on permanency which is NOT made at the Consulate.

Registration in the RNE and solicitation of the Cédula de Identidade Estrangeiro however is the same in all cases. The only real difference is that for those applying through the Federal Police here in Brazil it is all done at the same time now, pedido de permanência definitiva, registro and Cédula. It used to be that you couldn't register and request the ID card until AFTER permanency was actually granted and this alone was sometimes taking two years or more.

Finally somebody has woken up and smelled the coffee in this country. They've ruled that in cases of marriage, stable union or birth of a Brazilian child the foreigner applying for the visa has a Constitutional right to receive it, except in some very limited (and extremely rare) circumstances so now as long as all the paperwork is in order, permanency is immediate, registration is done right away and the only wait is for the ID card to be produced.

I received my VIPER a week after applying. According to the NYC Consulate website, they have to go the FP iif people are making a claim for residency based on marriage if the marriage is less than five years. My timetable was like this: 2/25/14, submitted visa aplication and supporting documents, fees, etc. 3/4/14, received passport with visa approved. 4/25/14, arrived in Brazil. 5/7/14, registered with FP. 10/7/14, went to FP and picked up Cédula.

Given that I had handled the process for us in the USA, I can tell you it was much faster and more efficient than when I dealt with the old INS.

James you are REALLY shining a bright light on the otherwise murky subject of VISAS here in Brazil. VALEU!

Just imagine what it was like when I arrived here 13 years ago, before Expat-blog existed and there was NOBODY at all to ask for advice and information....yikes.

I had to re-invent the wheel ten times a day, for everything you can imagine. That's why when Julien asked me to volunteer to be a member of the Experts Team I jumped at it. I vowed to myself that I would do whatever it took to prevent one foreigner from going through the stuff I had to......... so far I'm keeping that promise.

so ... what are the important changes to permanent visas?
I am a Canadian, with permanent resident status here in Brasil.
My girlfriend would like to come here to "possibly" life.
What problems may I encounter?
Now, I need extra help!
Despite living here 4 years, my portuguese is maybe 12%. at best.
I rely on others, and courses are 3 - 4 times the price that of english courses.
That's ridiculous!  And there is no class!  It's one on one, which leads to no interaction.
I always felt that the best for learning.
So, how have I managed?  yes, through the "grace of others".
I love it here, but feelings of isolation are overwhelming!
I often lie, and tell people I'm here for much less time, because i am ashamed.
Is there someone can help me?
I feel so stupid.

The only changes are in the timeframe in which the permanency is processed and the fact that all of the three different steps are now done at the same time rather than first applying for "Permanência Definitiva" and then waiting until the visa is issued to register in the RNE and solicit the Cédula de Identidade Estrangeiro ID card.

Other than that the process itself remains unchanged and the documents required are all the same as before.

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Here is my experience today at the Federal Police today in Macae/RJ applying for CIE under the new procedures.

First and foremost - it was an absolute success and I was out the door in 30 minutes.

I required the following documents:

- Passport (and copies of all pages) * the DPF agent did not want to unstamped pages of my passport and did not seem to care that they were notarized.
- Application, which I had to redo, handwritten
- Protocol, which I was provided, handwritten
- GRUs - paid
- DOU
- Spouse RG (I also provided passport) copies were not notarized
- Marriage certificate (He did not need the original but did want to see the notarized copy, and let me keep it and just took a un-notarized copy)

That was it. He fingerprinted me, stamped my passport, issued a new protocol and my SINCRE and RNE will be ready in 5 days.

This was all done in a matter of 30 minutes with a level of PROFESSIONALISM never seen or heard of in Manaus/AM.

THANK GOD, I am out of that city and state.

:D


(And a special thank to James, for his translation and guiding me through the process and this amazing city this week.)

Matt, I am so glad that you've finally waded through all this bureaucratic mess and that at least this final part was so much less painless.

It's funny how we always see the city in which we live through very different eyes when we're showing a visitor around. I really am enjoying your visit and your being here has really put me on the path of enjoying living in this place much more than I did before. The past few days have be great fun for me and I will not be looking forward to your departure at the end of this week.

Our friendship began through Expat-blog, but it has flourished into a very close and lasting friendship because of your visit.

Cheers,
James

And, four days later, a day before I leave, I have my RNE and SINCRE.

Brazil isn't so bad after all - just Manaus/AM and the people you associate with.

Good luck to all those in this process. I am certainly glad mine is over with. I certainly deserved my permanency after the trauma and b/s I have experienced while living in Brazil previously. Mostly caused by my own doing. However I make no apologies for getting it the round about way.  :P

And a special thanks to James for everything and hosting me during this seven day unforgettable trip.

And another special thanks to Bradesco for allowing me to let loose and have the outburst I have always wanted to have in a bank here reaching over the glass ripping my passport out of the tellers hand. I now feel truly liberated even though I did not get a replacement debit card.


http://www.naiptel.com/IMG_2680.JPG

Update:

I applied for my permanent residency just a little over 2 months ago in Boa Vista. They told me to come back in 2 months to collect my RNE card. I went there today and they didn't have it. I'm supposed to come back next month. We'll see...

I have stated right since the new rules came into effect that there was no way on earth, when it was taking a year and sometimes more just to produce the Cédula de Identidade Estrangeiro, that they were going to somehow as if by magic be able to produce the card in two months now. This is just not possible.

Matt was told here in Macaé that he should come back in 180 days and I doubt that it will be ready even then.

wjwoodward :

I have stated right since the new rules came into effect that there was no way on earth, when it was taking a year and sometimes more just to produce the Cédula de Identidade Estrangeiro, that they were going to somehow as if by magic be able to produce the card in two months now. This is just not possible.

Matt was told here in Macaé that he should come back in 180 days and I doubt that it will be ready even then.

Yeah, I remember you saying that. I'll keep dropping by the federal police every month. We'll see how long it actually takes

There, I changed my picture. I hope EVERYONE is happy! :D

Hello,

Is there a way to find out if the CIE card is ready?

Thanks!

You should still be able to check if the CIE is ready on the Policia Federal website:

www.dpf.gov.br

If you scroll down to the bottom of the main page you'll find a box entitled "Estrangeiro" click on the link "Consulta Andamento de Emissão de CIE". I'm pretty sure it still works. If that doesn't get you any results you can always phone the Regional Superintendency - Foreigner's Sector where you registered to find out.

Cheers,
William James Woodward, Expat-blog Experts Team

usmc_mv :

There, I changed my picture. I hope EVERYONE is happy! :D

The new you.... :top:

Thanks! It works

The CIE (Cédula de Identidade Estrangeiro) is just the official ID card, correct? That is, once I'm issued my RNE, I will be an official Permanent Resident of Brazil regardless of how long it takes for me to receive my CIE, right?

I have my appointment with the FP here in Campinas on December 9. Wish me luck!

usmc_mv :

Here is my experience today at the Federal Police today in Macae/RJ applying for CIE under the new procedures.

First and foremost - it was an absolute success and I was out the door in 30 minutes.

I required the following documents:

- Passport (and copies of all pages) * the DPF agent did not want to unstamped pages of my passport and did not seem to care that they were notarized.
- Application, which I had to redo, handwritten
- Protocol, which I was provided, handwritten
- GRUs - paid
- DOU
- Spouse RG (I also provided passport) copies were not notarized
- Marriage certificate (He did not need the original but did want to see the notarized copy, and let me keep it and just took a un-notarized copy)

That was it. He fingerprinted me, stamped my passport, issued a new protocol and my SINCRE and RNE will be ready in 5 days.

This was all done in a matter of 30 minutes with a level of PROFESSIONALISM never seen or heard of in Manaus/AM.

THANK GOD, I am out of that city and state.

:D


(And a special thank to James, for his translation and guiding me through the process and this amazing city this week.)

Congrats, Matt! My appointment with the FP  is on December 9, and I'm hoping that my process goes as smoothly as yours did in Macae.  A couple  questions for you: What is the protocol that you were provided?  And what do you mean by DOU?

Thx,
Victoria

Hi Victoria,

Exactly, under the new procedures you do the whole works at one time. You apply for "Permanência Definitiva", register in the RNE (Registro Nacional de Estrangeiros) and apply for the Cédula de Identidade Estrangeiro.

If all the paperwork is in order and present then permanency is granted immediately and your passport gets a stamp to reflect that you are registered as PERMANENTE. Doesn't matter from that point on how long it takes them to make up the ID card. You won't likely get a printout of the SINCRE information in the PF database for about one week after your application, but you should go back and pick that up too.

From the moment you've applied (based on marriage/stable union or based on a Brazilian child) you can then apply for your Carteira de Trabalho and work.

Cheers,
James     Expat-blog Experts Team

Thank you, James! As always, your information is invaluable!  :kiss:

James, I never got a stamp in my passport. They just gave me a paper with very limited info on it while I wait for my RNE card. Next time I go there, should I request that they stamp my passport?

The paper I got:

http://i61.tinypic.com/2rgnh5l.jpg

Yes, they are supposed to stamp your passport as "Registrado como Permanente" and they are supposed to give you a copy of your SINCRE (which they usually will do 5 working days after you have registered). It appears that they're NOT all on the same page of the songbook yet.

Well, I have received work that my CIE is on it's way to Macae already, which means it took under a month for it to be processed, produced and mailed. If this is a sign of things to come I am truly impressed.

I too have just received an email that my CIE is ready for pickup at PF. I applied on Nov. 18th so that is 3 weeks ago. I had already done the VIPER procedure at the Brazilian Consulate, I don't know if that influences the process.

I did not receive any word that my CIE was at the Federal Police. Seems in Manaus it is not important to notify you. I went to the Police today and discovered it had been sitting there since October 6th, That was only 1 week from the date I did the RNE form.   After Taking more than 2 years  to do the entire process of Marriage and application it is finally finished and I have my CIE in hand. One good thing for my age it is not necessary for me to renew it since I am over 60. So yes it seems they have finally really fixed the terrible backlog of RNE's and CIE's and the process seems to be working rapidly. This is something  that isn't typical of Brazil maybe there is hope for them... Now if they could only fix the banking system to eliminate the long waits when you go to the bank. They could learn a lot from the US banking system what takes 2 - 3 hrs in Brazil is only a matter of minutes in the US

usmc_mv :

There, I changed my picture. I hope EVERYONE is happy! :D

yes I am extremely happy today b/c you changed your picture.rsrsrsrsrsrs...now my cat doesn't get scared ...rsrsrsrs
btw you should check with the PF they actually had my CIE at the station in one week after I filed the RNE. But they never notified me of this fact

JohnC :
usmc_mv :

There, I changed my picture. I hope EVERYONE is happy! :D

yes I am extremely happy today b/c you changed your picture.rsrsrsrsrsrs...now my cat doesn't get scared ...rsrsrsrs
btw you should check with the PF they actually had my CIE at the station in one week after I filed the RNE. But they never notified me of this fact

Very happy for you John... Congratulations. And FYI - the lines in Macae were not nearly as bad as Manaus. However, that said - they were HORRIBLE!

John and Tony,

I'm glad to hear that you guys are finally done with the bureaucracy.

Matt, yours should be arriving here in Macaé any day now, hope to see you again soon. Funny, my cat (the cat from Hell) didn't get scared by your picture nor by your smiling face while you were here last time....... wonder why? Guess he knew that underneath it all you're just a pussycat too. rsrsrsrs

Cheers,
James

James
When describing document fees can you clarify something.

For example you state Pedido de Permanencia Definitava R$ 102,00

Is this one hundred two reals or is this one hundred two thousand reals ?

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