A new law prohibits our kids from going to schools in Indonesia?

A presidential decree recently issued through the ministry of education prohibits Indonesian kids from registering to international schools in Indonesia. When in the past parents could apply for derogation this it seems is no longer accepted.

These schools are restricted to students with foreign passports. The school in which I intended to register my two young kids demand a foreign passport and a proof of residence or a KITAS, without which registering to the school won't proceed.

My wife is Indonesian and therefore my kids have dual citizenships. Applying for KITAS for my kids when they have already the Indonesian passports is I am being told the only way I could get them into school.

I need to know if other parents are facing similar issues here in Jakarta? Is this specific to the school I am talking  to or is it applicable for all international schools in Jakarta?

I have posted similar messages in other forums but did not get any responses back. If you know families in Jakarta and there must be quite few expats married to Indonesian wives, are they facing the same issue?

Thanks

please see your private message

Hello all,

Welcome to Expat.com Sam1234567 :)

I have moved your messages (as it is in English) to the English forum Jakarta. :)

Cheers
Olivier
Expat.com Team

Sam1234567 :

A presidential decree recently issued through the ministry of education prohibits Indonesian kids from registering to international schools in Indonesia. When in the past parents could apply for derogation this it seems is no longer accepted.

I think you're talking about UU 17/2010, a law passed in 2010, but not really much bothered with as no one seemed to be able to sort things out for ages.
Not really my field, but I understand the old national plus schools will become international schools, and international schools will be called, foreign or non Indonesian schools.
(I could be wrong here as the thing seems to be a rare old mess)
As I understand it, the national plus must have either 4 or 5 local teachers to every foreigner, and the international (foreign) schools can't have local students.
There was also something about serious restrictions on foreign teachers, I think I read something about them being allowed to teach English, but nothing else.
Last I heard, it was still up in the air, but that may have changed this year with the introduction of the new Indonesian national curriculum.
My daughter has a set of those books and I can assure you, they're absolute crap that wouldn't challenge a semi dead dog's brain.
Whoever wrote that utter rubbish must assume Indonesian kids are as thick as two short planks.
To the subject in hand, the naughty Indonesian pervert caretakers at JIS may well have added to this problem as the evil little toads seem to have either upset someone with power, or someone with an agenda has seen a chance to cause problems.

Sadly, it's mostly Indonesian kids that'll suffer from this stupidity but, as the OP suggests, other mixed race or foreign kids might well kop for a little brown stuff from the fan as well.
I've just been to my sister in law's school to deliver some bits and bobs to her, and the kids were crowding round, trying to learn a little extra English.
(that's a local Muslim boarding school)
As with Malaysia when they effectively dropped English, Indonesia will find itself with serious problems because of a lack of English speakers.
The slightly good news (from a selfish point of view), my kids will have a massive advantage in the job market as few Indonesian will be able to compete with them.

In other related news....

http://en.tempo.co/read/news/2014/08/25 … Curriculum

TEMPO.CO, Jakarta - The 2013 Curriculum apparently earned several controversies, starting from its study books to its teaching system. Tarjono, a teacher at State Middle School 181 Karet Tengsin, Central Jakarta, claimed that the curriculum forced teachers to master a subject beyond their educational background. "Teachers must also understand other study branches. This can lead to misconception," he said.

I'm going to be brutal here; if a primary teacher can't keep up with those dumbo designed text books, they shouldn't be teaching.

AND>>>>>>>>

http://www.thejakartaglobe.com/news/edu … raft-case/

Jakarta. Testimony implicating Muhammad Nuh, minister for education and culture, in graft-ridden projects involving his ministry and several lawmakers, emerged on Monday during the trial of former Democratic Party chairman Anas Urbaningrum.

Graft convict and former Democratic Party treasurer Muhammad Nazaruddin said Nuh attended meetings where several ministry projects were being discussed.

Also present at these meetings were Anas and former Democratic Party deputy secretary general Angelina Sondakh, who was also convicted in a graft case.

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