Living in Cuenca, Ecuador

I was born and raised in Nevada. I moved to Cuenca, Ecuador on September 4th, 2012. I moved here because my Dad found Cuenca and moved here 3 years ago. I have traveled to many different Countries and I knew I always wanted to live abroad. Before moving here I had never stepped foot in South America. I sold what I could, gave away what I couldn't sell and packed everything that meant something to me into 3 duffle bags, a back pack and began my 32 hour journey to Cuenca. It wasn't really hard for me to adjust to life here because my Dad had been here for 3 years and I already had some connections via facebook of people my Dad knew. I was just approved for my Residency and now I begin looking for a job. Daily life here is pretty laid back and incredible. Some days it's hanging out in the park with friends, relaxing at home or enjoying a good meal at one of the many amazing restaurants this city has to offer. I have almost been here a year and I can't believe it. Now that I have Residency, I am looking forward to the next step in this incredible journey I have been blessed to live.

Glad you are so happy there, am planning on moving there myself. One thing, I keep reading you can't work there unless you own a business. Can one just get a small part time job? Want to stay somewhat busy. Thanks
Randy

Holo Randy. I dont know about working in cuenca, I have not made it  yet.Now i live in lasvegas. Cuenca looks like a great place,just big enought,and the weather is great.Here it has been 114.I think my first trip will be oct.nov. this year.grantgresser[at]yahoo.com

You'll need to obtain your Cedula 1st

movinon :

Glad you are so happy there, am planning on moving there myself. One thing, I keep reading you can't work there unless you own a business. Can one just get a small part time job? Want to stay somewhat busy. Thanks
Randy

In addition to requiring a Cedula, which can be obtained once you have your permanent visa, work rights also depend on which visa you have. For example, a pensioner visa does not allow you to work in Ecuador without special permission and that permission is only granted if you take a job that an Ecuadorian cannot fill easily, teaching English for example. When you look at which Visa is best for you, be sure you understand any limitations that visa may have regarding work rights. I don't see this in many of the descriptions of the Visas, so you may need to consult an Ecuadorian immigration lawyer to get full details.

I wAnt to move I wish my family would support me. What I have reAd have been positive I want to tryi don't speak Spanish I can learn am willing to give it a try it sounds like a place I can afford to live after I retire in December. I am very adventurist and not afraid to try it.

Dear Hellen  Good for you. Cuenca,would be the place to go. Iam also going to give it a try.Maybe next year we will have coffee in cuenca.  good luck.

Marliita :

I was born and raised in Nevada. I moved to Cuenca, Ecuador on September 4th, 2012.

According to your profile you are 28, born on 1/15/80.  Finding employment may be more difficult than you realize.

As Joe K points out, even with a Cedula if your employment skills are readily available then I would highly doubt you getting work until other residency criteria's are met. If you have skills that are needed then I think the road gets easier.
If working is part of your plan you had better secure the job and be very clear about your details before moving down

Yes, please, if I may stare this more clearly: like other countries, the U.S. included, you MUST have permission to work here. This is the unique purpose of the Professional visa. Jobs paying a salary an expat would consider livable are not easy to find here, and if you could fine one, you would first have have to have a visa with work rights, most likely be required to speak fluent Spanish, and lastly, have credentials which would make you a better choice than an Ecuadorian applying for the same job. I know of severaI well trained Ecuadorians who are underemployed because of the tight job market. The will certainly be considered first over any expat for any position. I really don't wish to discourage anyone, but I also don' believe in promoting unrealistic thinking.

Now, the good news. A close Ecuadorian friend just quit his job teaching English in Loja. There will be at least one job opening in the fall (probably to be filled in August) for a Engliah teacher. That job would start at $400 a month, but could be negotiated upwards depending on experience. It is a job where an expat would have the advantage over an Ecuadorian. So, getting a job here is not impossible, just difficult.

One other thought, your best bet for getting a job here may be through companies or organizations hiring in your country specifically for work/service in Ecuador. This would get you here so that you could then work towards a more long-range solution. You would need to research this possibility in your own country, but I am aware that they do exist in the U.S. I wish all of you wanting this good luck.

Hole Joseph.  You give out very good advice about working in Cuenca. I hope to visit in oct.

The year was wrong, I didn't realize it said 1980, should have said 1985. There are a lot of gringos here my age.....some own Cafes, work in schools or restaurants. It shouldn't be that difficult to find a job here.

I live in Lasvegas now. but I like Cuenca Ecuador a lot. I would like to have lunch with you and learn more about Cuenca.  grantgresser[at]yahoo.com

I now live in Lasvegas. But I want to move to Cuenca . Hope to receive a letter from you.

grant gresser :

I now live in Lasvegas. But I want to move to Cuenca . Hope to receive a letter from you.

It has been over 6 years since she made her two posts on here, guessing you gonna hear nothing.

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