what is the standard tipping percentage in Malta

I was wondering if someone could explain the restaurant  tipping etiquette in Malta. Actually, to be honest, I'm not sure I completely understand it in America as well. In America, I believe that the standard amount that you should leave is twice the tax of the food you ordered, which usually comes out to about 17-20% and slightly higher if the waiter/waitress does a good job.  Technically, we are not legally required to leave a tip and we are told that it is completely optional. However, waiters/ waitresses are usually paid less than minimum wages and must rely on these tips to get by, so even though tips are technically optional, all customers feel morally obligated to leave a tip even if they hated the service.  I have always wondered why restaurants don't just charge a little extra for the food and use the extra amount to pay the waiters/waitresses a more livable wage. That way, there would be no need to leave a tip.  The reason why I prefer it that way is because if I am told that my meal is $12, I want to pay $12. I don't want to be told that the meal is $10 and then I have to leave a $2 tip. I may still pay $12 either way, but I prefer the first way because I like the idea of knowing how much something costs before I buy it. I was told that this is how restaurants work in Malta and in the rest of Europe. If I was misinformed, then could somebody clearly explain to me the tipping etiquette in Malta.  I said that it is about 20% in America, but what is the standard tipping percentage in Malta.

Most people leave up to 10%,depending on quality of service.

Hi jmuthe,

when we were in the US my american girlfriend was always responsible for the tipping -)) She calculated it the same way as you ie twice the state tax on the bill but in New York that is not enough. We once had a fight with a waiter who was 'expecting' more than 20 % after average service.

Germans are used to rounding up the bill by 5-10 % although bills usually already include a service charge.

Here in Malta I notice that many don't leave a tip although I find it decent to give 5-10 % on a cheaper bill and less percentage if the meal was expensive if the service was good. As the service is not always good I sometimes do leave without leaving a tip ! For a 100 € bill I would not give 10 € tip!

My Maltese and Expat friends tip on a similar basis .

So here in Malta you pay the listed price plus what you deem appropriate up to about 10 % extra but not more than a few Euro's if you are in an expensive place.

Cheers
Ricky

yes i d go along with ricky on this one.

Toon stop agreeing with people your freaking me out !! :)

Although ... I do have to agree... if the service is bad Dont tip, If the service is Average, then maybe just €1 if it is good then upto 10%

Julian.

What a happy and helpful place this is now the trolls have been vanquished :-)

" up to about 10 % extra but not more than a few Euro's" - yep, thats my experience

oh and no tipping in bars

if you are tipping then its a courtesy for the tip to be in cash even if paying by cc

Q...when you tip how sure are you that the tip goes to the waiter waitress....as i have come across places where they didnt get the tip . Some places pool the tips and share it our at the end of each evening or week...but some dont and the owner keeps it....e.g. a local establishment I know did this with a 30euro tip ( a one off i know).....staff didnt see a cent of it...and since that day i have never been back to it.

George, I was Kidding... 3 posts in quick succession.

I give the tip to the waitress/waiter themselves seperate to the bill, if they pool the tips then they would put it together.  This is realistically the only way to know that the person has received the tip.

J.

I also hear that when you go out to a restaurant, you don't have to worry about tipping the waiters or waitresses. 

Whaaaat? Thats just common decency. Tip if you liked the meal/service, don't if you didn't.

Hi jmuthe,

I have created a new thread as from your post on "tipping etiquette in Malta" on the Malta forum.