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What would typical salary be teaching English in Moscow?

As a native speaker of English, what could I expect as a starting salary if I was to teach English in Moscow? Thanks!

Joe

Joe, with most schools, the salary is about 850 rubles per academic hour and with some, particularly those not requiring CELTA, about 600 rubles per a.h.(45 minutes). I teach privately after working with BKC here for 18 months and earn 1500/45 mins in most cases, less if they come to me. If you get some experience with a school, I think this is the best route, let me know if you need more info, cheers, Hugh

hola!quiero saber de extranjeros viviendo en Rusia, soy Argentina y mi novio ruso, ire alla me csare y quedare a vivir, soy profesora de ingles. y hablo ingles español.
que posibilidades de trabajo tengo alal como profesora de ingles, tengo años de experiencia en escuelas de todos los niveles aca en Argentina. Saben de argentinos vivendo alla ???

Hi Hugh,

What is the current market like in Moscow? Is there a big demand for teachers right now?

Also, being the middle of October, would it be difficult to find work now?

I was in Moscow for a while, but I came back to Australia. I would like to return to Moscow in the next few weeks, and teach english.

I have an engineering degree, I am starting a TEFL course and a little teaching experience in Moscow before.

Suggestions for best place to find work?

are you still in Moscow?

There is always work for teachers here, schools will pay between 650 and 950r depending on experience - you can try Denis School, http://www.dschool.ru/ and check out expat.ru for vacancies (avoid Erika at Academy Ltd).Of course privately you'll get more money (from 1500 to 3000 rubles for 60 minutes)but a network helps with this, good luck.

I think hughkmc is right - it will be around 750-800 rubles in school and up to 3500 rur if you will teach children of crich parents)

Dear job hunters,

Why not approach the International schools? If you have TEFL qualifications, or even better, a PGCE you might get a decent salary and a nice job. Unfortunately, there is a lot of competition teaching English as a private tutor here. In my area, I have seen private lessons advertised for 200r per hour (I'm not saying it's quality teaching!) Unless you have a lot of experience or contacts in Moscow you might struggle a bit at first.

Good luck anyway!

As somebody who has been teaching English in Moscow since 2003, I think I can tell a little about salaries.  The average is anywhere from 800 to 1600 rubles per class, some make more and some make less, it really depends on the school you are working for.  Most of the Macschools pay around 1200 rubles per 90 minute class depending on the teachers qualifications and experience.  That can be good if the school provides housing, if not, you will find yourself not in a good situation.

You have to be extremely careful about who you except work with, many of the Russian owned and for that fact, franchise schools are badly managed by people who have no idea of what business ethics and employee relations.  Employees are not always treated fairly.  BKC lost a law suite filed by a former teacher they unfairly dismissed last year, and BKC is one of the more popular schools with some teachers.  You have to be careful.

Teaching English is in strong demand, but teacher qualifications are becoming stronger.  A new law passed last August requires teachers to provide a clean police record from Russia, which means ESL teachers from overseas will not only have to provide a clean record from the home police, but also the Russian police before being hired.  Also, degrees and teaching certifications must have an apostille stamp to show they are legit.  The Russian Ministry of Education has been doing spot checks of schools since summer and if the school is found to hire people without the proper documentation, the schools are fined and could lose their license.  I know of a couple of teachers who were let go because their diploma and CELTA did not have the proper Apostille stamp.  So, things are changing here in the ESL teaching field.
                                   JD

bossman1 :

As somebody who has been teaching English in Moscow since 2003, I think I can tell a little about salaries.  The average is anywhere from 800 to 1600 rubles per class, some make more and some make less, it really depends on the school you are working for.  Most of the Macschools pay around 1200 rubles per 90 minute class depending on the teachers qualifications and experience.  That can be good if the school provides housing, if not, you will find yourself not in a good situation.

You have to be extremely careful about who you except work with, many of the Russian owned and for that fact, franchise schools are badly managed by people who have no idea of what business ethics and employee relations.  Employees are not always treated fairly.  BKC lost a law suite filed by a former teacher they unfairly dismissed last year, and BKC is one of the more popular schools with some teachers.  You have to be careful.


                                   JD

I work for a private Russian school - they pay well, I but have not been paid since September!  So, beware.  It is true that many Russian employers are unscrupulous. 

Fortunately, I also have a great job at an international school - a good solid organisation - but they pay along the lines of the Macschools.  Much as I'd like to, I just wouldn't survive if I worked for them full time.  Remember what your outgoings are: rent, flights, medical insurance, visas (increasingly expensive with all the bureaucracy and documentation.)

So, how do I survive?  I work 13 hours a day.  I make my cash by working privately.  This is only possibly as I have acquired an excellent reputation over many years.

For a newcomer, I'd recommend trying to get a job with a language school that offers visa support and help with accommodation.

Good luck

I remember when the schools all took care of these things.  When I first came here I was working at four different schools at the same time.  I guess I was lucky in that I knew how to choose good schools, one I am still working with, they always pay every two weeks, and if they are short of cash, the owner's sister would pay me from her own money.  But not being paid is common with these small operations.

Even though I work for myself now, I still often have to work seven days a week because of students rescheduling classes because of business meetings or family.  Working for yourself is the only way to make money teaching English here, because schools will only give you a quarter of what a student pays if you are lucky.
                                   JD

I am curently teaching at a private school in China, only children ages three through twelve, I want to make the move to Moscow and have been offered a position at Denis school for 700 rubles an hour(45 min) and no housing or visa support.  Is this worth a change for me?

Dear Natsne45,

It depends how many hours you are employed to teach, and if you are paying tax. Accommodation is incredibly expensive here, even in the far suburbs (900€ for a decent 1-bedroom apartment) and tax is roughly 13% (I think). The visa is not too expensive, providing that they let you apply for a 1 year business visa. If you have to reapply every 3 months, it might cost you a bit. Remember, you can always start doing private tuitions once you are there, especially if you work in a school, you will be able to make good contacts. Think about it very carefully, Moscow can be an expensive place to live!

Good luck on making the decision. All the best,

Kamol

I still have a year on my current contract, which is laughable becuase its more like a wishful guideline.  I appreciate all the info.  Is there a market for teaching English in any other cities other than Moscow or St. Pete?  I am looking at Vladivostok.

Vladivostok is the largest Russian Far Eastern city, home to the Russian Eastern Fleet, shipping and fishing are the main industries.  Not many westerners there though, mostly Chinese businessmen and tourists.  Several Universities there, so English should be in demand, especially since not many native English speakers venture there.  But like in most big cities, rent is expensive since most who rent are Chinese businessmen or tourists.

Another city I would recommend is Yaroslavl on the Volga River, a lovely city which has a large number of educational establishments which enclose all three levels of the Russian educational system: primary (ca. 20 establishments), middle (ca. 20 colleges and other secondary schools), and higher (8 state and 2 non-state funded higher educational institutions).  So English will be in demand there and the rent may not be as bad either.

Since Sochi will host the 2014 Winter Olympic Games, the mayor has order everybody to learn English.  English First won the contract to teach English for the preparation for the games, so I am sure they will be hiring, not to mention other English language educational opportunities there, but rent will be extremely high, higher than Moscow I'm afraid.  But I think there will be opportunities in smaller cities all around that area in preparation for the Olympic Games.
                                  JD

jhn124 :

As a native speaker of English, what could I expect as a starting salary if I was to teach English in Moscow? Thanks!

Joe

Hi!
Sure if you want to teach in some courses it won't be much. But if you can give private lesson, especially if you can come to your student's place and teach him business English you can ask for 1500 rub easy.
Some of my colleagues paid about 1200 rub for Russian teacher (actually she was a student) who came to our office after job and gave them essentials.
The main rule, the more advanced level of the language you can teach the more money you can get.

I have a long time experience in teaching English for 17 years.
I have already obtained postgraduate studies diploma in teaching and a pre MA certification in English language linguistics and finally I have a bachelor degree in English language. Currently, I pursue my MA degree in English language linguistics.
I would like to teach English privately.
Worthy noted, I am not a native English speaker. I am Egyptian.

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